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Ervay's picture

Cooking Rice (post #32366)

Help me settle a food feud!  Which requires more water to cook, short grain rice or long grain rice? I know it depends on application but as a rule which one is it?

evelyn's picture

(post #32366, reply #1 of 37)

I have never thought about it and didn't know there was an application...I have always gone 1 part rice to 2 parts water or stock.

 

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
atatkdmom's picture

(post #32366, reply #2 of 37)

This is what I have experienced:  White rice cooks much faster than brown rice, short grain rice is stickier, and long grain rice is more separated upon cooking.  As far as which takes more/less water, I would think it depends upon the types of short and long grain rice you are using. 

Heather's picture

(post #32366, reply #3 of 37)

They use about the same--depends on the age of the rice, etc. I use about 1 1/4 C water to 1 C rice if I'm doing plain rice, more water for pilafs.
Which side of this argument are you on?

soccermom's picture

(post #32366, reply #4 of 37)

I do it the easy way and don't need to remember formulae; cook rice like pasta in lots of water. Drain when done.

 


 

 

 

Glenys's picture

(post #32366, reply #8 of 37)

The only problem with that versus pasta is that pasta is not a kernel or grain and we want to shed that bit of excess starch off. By draining rice, especially white, you're tossing out the only goodness left. I don't find this method gives the distinctive individual fluffy grain that a ratio'd cooking delivers.

soccermom's picture

(post #32366, reply #9 of 37)

Hmm, maybe I should rethink my technique. I never consider rice as having much nutrition to it.

 


 

 

 

knitpik's picture

(post #32366, reply #11 of 37)

Buy a rice cooker. Easy peasy.

soccermom's picture

(post #32366, reply #12 of 37)

You... you enabler you!! I don't need one, I dislike rice, I don't have room, and if I'm getting an electric appliance, it better make pina coladas.


So, no thank you :)


 


 

 

 

Adele's picture

(post #32366, reply #13 of 37)

I dislike rice


Me too.  Or at least I used to not like it.  Listening to posters here though has made me try again.  I now have rice for risotto, jasmine rice, brown rice which I've yet to try.  I even have a bag of wild rice, just because it looked cool, haven't tried it either. (I know it's not real rice).   I think a major part of why I didn't like it is I never had it growing up and when I had it at school and such, it was tasteless.  I also chose other sides when eating out if rice was involved.  


It's amazing how chicken stock, spices and such make it taste so good.  


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

soccermom's picture

(post #32366, reply #17 of 37)

You've reminded me that I do have lots of rice: converted, sticky for California rolls, arborio, basmati, and a wild mix. It just doesn't grab me the way bread or potatoes do. Maybe I should make more effort.


 


 


Edited 3/29/2006 8:14 pm ET by Canuck

 

 

berferd t's picture

(post #32366, reply #33 of 37)

Go to an Indian or Pakistani restaraunt and get a dish of Kheer. You will find rice can be so good it's addicting. Mostly it is what you make it into. If that's nothing good, then I vigorously agree it's no good.

knitpik's picture

(post #32366, reply #14 of 37)

<hee hee> Yes you do;-)
I couldn't live without my rice cooker.

Glenys's picture

(post #32366, reply #15 of 37)

You don't need a rice cooker unless you eat tons of plain rice, which for me is less than half the time.  I'm usually "pilaf"ing rices from different cuisines.


And I'd rather have a blender than a rice cooker too.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #32366, reply #16 of 37)

pamilyn's picture

(post #32366, reply #5 of 37)

If you are talking white rice, 2 parts liquid one part rice. Doesn't matter if it is long or short grain.IMO...

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

TracyK's picture

(post #32366, reply #6 of 37)

That rule of thumb only works for me if I'm cooking only one cup of rice. If I'm cooking 1 1/2 cups of rice, I use more than 2 cups of water, but not quite 3 cups. It's not a direct equivalent, at least in my experience.


 


Why is it so cold on this beach? And what's taking the bartender so long?

pamilyn's picture

(post #32366, reply #10 of 37)

I don't know. I allways just cook one cup of rice!! LOL

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

elizaram's picture

(post #32366, reply #7 of 37)

I do both in a rice cooker, with the same amount of water, and they turn out just fine. When cooking on the stovetop, I measure via Joyce Chen's method (stick finger in to measure the depth of rice in the pot, move tip of finger to top of rice, add water up to the same level). Both short and long grain rice turn out just fine by this method as well. I suppose in theory the short grain rice might be a little more compacted in the pot and therefore take less water, but I'm sure it's not a large amount, and rice is pretty forgiving.




Food-forward parents like mine served dinners of homemade falafel, Mediterranean fish stew or stir-fried beef with broccoli. To me, dishes like spaghetti and meatballs, mashed potatoes with gravy and macaroni and cheese seemed exotic and unattainable. --Julia Moskin (NYT)



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

Steinmetz's picture

(post #32366, reply #18 of 37)

Erv, two and one half cups of water (Boiling)add one cup of rice
Cover and reduce heat Stir often When done,(15-20 minutes) place hot rice pot into a larger pot containing one inch of cold water. Serve. (Keeps the rice from stiking to the hot pot's bottom.)

Eggs Ranchero/Pork fried rice/ Rice and beans/ Chilli and rice (NO beans) Steinmetz.

Glenys's picture

(post #32366, reply #19 of 37)

That's way more attention and one more pot than it needs to be.

Steinmetz's picture

(post #32366, reply #22 of 37)

If rice is not removed quickly, the last bits will stick to the still hot pot Besides, I have a woman to clean my pots . (My Wife Of 50 years) Rose.

Steinmetz.

Glenys's picture

(post #32366, reply #23 of 37)

Actually, if handled properly, the rice will not stick, however, it sounds like your wife has. That makes you lucky but not a clever cook!

Steinmetz's picture

(post #32366, reply #24 of 37)

Glen, does YOUR wife do the dishes? Are you STUCK with that chore?

Steinmetz

Glenys's picture

(post #32366, reply #25 of 37)

All I can say is I'm my own woman and as a chef, it's one of the roles that has to be modelled beacuse it's just a fact of life when the dishwasher runs off with the hostess, one still has to do the dishes.
At home, I still wouldn't cook rice that way but I do believe you were lucky in love. Sadly my guy still can't figure the transition from dinner table to dishwasher but all the girls, especially on this board, love him anyway.


Edited 3/29/2006 11:32 pm by Glenys

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #32366, reply #27 of 37)

I thought it was the line cooks that ran off with the hostess? The dishwashers get the ugly waitresses, right?

And the poor fry cooks are stuck with each other, lol!

Of course, the grill guys are too macho to date; they have rock cliffs to climb on their days off. What is it with men who work in front of open flames that makes them willing to risk life and limb in their off time?

Every grill guy I've ever known has ridden a motorcycle or had a jet ski or did some other thrill seeking thing.

The line cooks all think they are Rico Suave, and the dishwashers all aspire to be line cooks!

And don't even get me started on sous chefs. Not quite at head chef level, but they have all the bravos, machismo and attitude to spare. They run off with the female barstaff.

And the crowd was stilled.  One elderly man, wondering at the sudden silence, turned to the Child and asked him to repeat what he had said.  Wide-eyed, the Child raised his voice and said once again, "Why, the Emperor has no clothes!  He is naked!"
                -- "The Emperor's New Clothes"

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

Glenys's picture

(post #32366, reply #28 of 37)

We all know it, only Bourdain made serious money writing about it.

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #32366, reply #29 of 37)

Y'know, I haven't read Kitchen Confidential yet. I need to - I'm sure it will bring back some *just wonderful* (not) memories.

It is NO fun being the only girl in the kitchen when you are 18, have butt length blonde hair and bazoombas out to there.

Favorite game? Make Amy sit on the lettuce spinner to keep it from wandering. Oh, that was fun. I'm sure you can just imagine the comments that got.

For those that don't know, it's this giant tub, about the size of a small washing machine, that you put wet lettuce into. Plug it in, and it spins it. With LOTS of excess vibration. See the funny?

Thankfully, the head chef at that particular place was wonderful, and I learned so much there. The first sous chef was great, too. The second sous chef, gawd what an ####. He defined the stereotype.

And the crowd was stilled.  One elderly man, wondering at the sudden silence, turned to the Child and asked him to repeat what he had said.  Wide-eyed, the Child raised his voice and said once again, "Why, the Emperor has no clothes!  He is naked!"
                -- "The Emperor's New Clothes"

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

Steinmetz's picture

(post #32366, reply #30 of 37)

My Bad You sounded like my daughter in law's brother Glenn.

Incidentally,Glenn can't get enough of my Pork Fried Rice.
To be truthful,Glenys, I do my share of dish washing (Mostly when Rose is away for a week at Las Vegas.Did I mention the laundry? and the sewing ? (I made that last one up)

Not wholly untrue: I do sew and make things of leather.

ED from Connecticut ( Steinmetz is an alias)

I'm mostly on the knots forum (See above) in case you need wood working advice .

Glenys's picture

(post #32366, reply #20 of 37)

An besides, properly cooked rice doesn't stick to the bottom, and the proper attention comes from the cook knowing when to turn the element or flame down and let absorption and gentle heat do the rest.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #32366, reply #21 of 37)

I still prefer to cook rice in the oven.