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Cooking Pork Tenderloin

MadMom's picture

Y'all know me...I cannot resist anything which is free.  So, I brought home a Central Market marinated pork tenderloin.  I chose the one which I thought was least offensive, which was a herb-dijon.  Here's my question.  How on earth do I cook the thing?  Should I brown it first, toss it in a hot oven (how hot and for how long), slice it into medallions, or what?  I know, I, too, would rather mix my own marinade, but what can I say...it was free, and it is going to be dinner tonight.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jillsifer's picture

(post #30776, reply #61 of 114)

I tried it. About three years ago, I clocked myself to the minute in a little "dinner at home" vs. "drive-through fast-food" competition. Dinner at home--pasta with some marinara sauce that I'd made and frozen, along with a plain lettuce-and-tomato salad, not much fuss--took 33 minutes exactly. Driving through a nearby McDonald's took 32, and I guarantee you it cost more and was waaaaaaayyyyy less healthful.


When I saw that the difference was SIXTY SECONDS, I realized I had that much time to spare to feed my son properly.


 



 


 


Edited 7/5/2005 3:23 pm ET by jillsifer

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

Lword's picture

(post #30776, reply #62 of 114)

>just don't seem to have any discernment


You can say that again! I was having a french fry thought and went to jackinthebox.com where they have a "nutrition" analysis and list of all ingredients in their food. It's not worth it, like Jill says, and more than a bit crazy when you consider that children need good food for their growing brains and bodies. I will always be indebted to my parents for giving me good food - thank goodness they had little choice way back then before the packaged and fast foods.  


L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
Lexi's picture

(post #30776, reply #63 of 114)

Unfortunately, you are so right.  A case in point is my step-son and his family, all of whom I love.  He and his wife could probably turn their kitchen into a closet with a microwave without any problem.  Trying to cook a meal for them is a trial.  Last time they were in town, I was told the boys loved meatballs and spaghetti and would eat broccoli (apparently the only vegetable they eat).  Silly me, I spent hours preparing homemade meatballs and tomato sauce and cooked fresh broccoli.  I should have known that what they liked was frozen broccoli, frozen meatballs and sauce from a jar.  Bottom line, the boys wouldn't touch it (it tasted "yukky") and ended up eating cereal for dinner.  Their parents ate the pasta and meatballs, but one didn't eat salad because I had no bottled dressing (I guess balsamic vinaigrette is also yukky).  I fear there's no hope for the boys; I think they'll probably grow up to be Neanderthals, like their parents, when it comes to food.  They're in town again and came for breakfast on Sunday before going across to the beach.  I was advised to make pancakes (plain, no blueberries or bananas), which they ate, but that was it.  No chicken-apple sausage, no eggs, no fruit, no yogurt.  DH spent an hour putting together a delicious compote of mangoes, peaches, nectarines, kiwi, bananas, cherries, strawberries and blueberries. Guess it's in the yukky category -- we ate it, they didn't.  I packed a cooler full of ham and cheese and turkey sandwiches, raw veggies, apples, cherries and grapes, which they took to the beach.  It all came back.  They had hot dogs and fries from the concession stand for lunch.  They're coming for dinner tomorrow.  I'm told they all eat chicken, and I'm thinking that Swanson's might be the way to go.  DH and I can eat cereal.      

 

 

Jean's picture

(post #30776, reply #64 of 114)

They would love some Kentucky fried. Don't cast pearls before swine. LOL

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

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Lexi's picture

(post #30776, reply #65 of 114)

Don't cast pearls before swine.


LOL -- That's so funny; my DD said the very same thing not 2 hours ago!  Ah well, hope springs eternal.  OTOH, if you'll promise I won't be struck by lightening, I'll think about KFC.  Hmmm ... that might just do it. 


 

 

Lword's picture

(post #30776, reply #66 of 114)

Sad, but their taste buds are damaged. I like Jean's idea and sentiment but would also make a little something for you and DH and casually say "Oh, I know you don't like homemade food, but if you want you can have a taste." Cruella tease mode, and sometimes it works! Of course you won't have enough of the good stuff for them, this time. Reminds me of a friend's kids who would only eat peanut butter and jelly on Wonderbread - until I toasted some whole wheat to disguise the non-whiteness. Funny kids. Funny parents. If guests want KFC I ask if it's convenient for them to pick it up on the way over!

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
Lexi's picture

(post #30776, reply #67 of 114)

Well, after my rant, I've decided that I won't cater to their poor dietary habits.  We're having grilled chicken, corn on the cob, a salad of fresh green beans with cherry tomatoes, basil and red onion, Kraft mac and cheese and overcooked broccoli (the way they like it) for the kids,  French-style potato salad for the adults, and blueberry cobbler and ice cream for dessert.  If they don't like it, they can stop for a Big Mac on the way home.  I feel better already.  

 

 

Jean's picture

(post #30776, reply #68 of 114)

Now who wouldn't love that is nuts!

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Lexi's picture

(post #30776, reply #73 of 114)

I think so too.  If they don't -- lots of good leftovers.  How bad is that?

 

 

Lword's picture

(post #30776, reply #69 of 114)

Sounds good to me (except for the Kraft and overcooked brocolli parts). I like your Let Them Buy Big Macs attitude. What is a French-style potato salad? One using oil and vinegar instead of mayo? Thanks!

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
Lexi's picture

(post #30776, reply #75 of 114)

What is a French-style potato salad? One using oil and vinegar instead of mayo?


Yes.  I use champagne vinegar, a little Dijon mustard, crushed garlic, minced shallots, S&P and EVOO in the dressing; drizzle the warm, sliced potatoes with some dry white wine and/or chicken stock and let them sit for a few minutes to absorb it; then add the dressing, diced, cooked slab bacon, thinly sliced green onions, minced parsley and S&P.  It's better if it's made at least a few hours in advance.     


 

 

Lword's picture

(post #30776, reply #106 of 114)

>with some dry white wine and/or chicken stock


Good idea lee! I've never tried using either as part of a potato salad but will. They are definitely better after sitting for a while, even if only absorbing mustard or oil and vinegar. Potatoes with mustard, mayo and parsley or anything green was a cheap filling snack between jobs or for a study break and still never lasts long here. I usually make twice as many potatoes as I think I'll need so I have leftovers to play with. When I pick up some champagne vinegar I'll try your dressing, many thanks :) 


L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
Gretchen's picture

(post #30776, reply #70 of 114)

I think that is the ONLY way to treat picky eaters.  Serve what you have. If they complain, then they have NO manners at all. 
Even my son used to eat my moussaka.  I did not even know he didn't like eggplant and that it even made his mouth itch!!  He has some fruit allergies so that is a possibility too.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #30776, reply #71 of 114)

Good for you for sticking to your cooking guns. Why the Kraft mac and cheese? Could you try homemade with orange cheddar, or is it just not worth it?

Lexi's picture

(post #30776, reply #72 of 114)

Why the Kraft mac and cheese? Could you try homemade with orange cheddar, or is it just not worth it?

  Gosh, isn't it unAmerican not to eat it as a kid?  I probably shouldn't admit it, but I've been known to finish the leftovers when I make it for the DGC -- I know, shame on me. 

 

 

Marcia's picture

(post #30776, reply #74 of 114)

You might find this difficult to believe, but I've never tasted the Kraft stuff and as far as I know, neither have my grown children. Guess that make us oddities. :)

Lexi's picture

(post #30776, reply #76 of 114)

I don't know that it makes you oddities, but I'd guess you're in the minority.  It's the kind of thing you have to grow up with; I can't imagine an adult having it for the first time and liking it.  DH's mother never made it, and he shakes his head in disbelief when he sees me eating it.

 

 

Marcia's picture

(post #30776, reply #77 of 114)

I grew up with very little processed food. My parents were older and my grandmother lived with us, which may have made a difference. Once in a while, my mother and I would try new things. I remember buying Rice-a-Roni(sp?) and we tried it together. It didn't please us at all.

Gretchen's picture

(post #30776, reply #78 of 114)

Certainly at my age we had no processed food.  And my sister asked me one time if we had mac and cheese (not packaged, of course) often--no, nor did our kids.  I even refused to get vitamins for our children.  They, of course, wanted Flintstones vitamins. I said there was absolutely no reason for them to have them with what they ate for their meals.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Lexi's picture

(post #30776, reply #79 of 114)

I grew up in a Greek household where cooking and gathering around the table for a meal were important aspects of family life; everything was made from scratch, even after processed food entered the marketplace.  I followed suit when I got married.  I really don't remember when I first ate packaged mac and cheese, it probably wasn't even available when I was a kid.  Come to think of it, it may have been when my own children were little!  I grew up with Greek-style baked macaroni and cheese, which is made with a cream sauce and lots of grated parmesan cheese.  It's a heart attack on a plate, but you go with a smile on your face.  My DDs loved it, but still begged for Kraft, like their friends had, and I occasionally gave in.  I remember trying other boxed foods, mashed potato buds, rice a roni, even TV dinners; blech -- no one liked any of it.  Both my DDs cook from scratch, but they do occasionally let the kids have mac & cheese.  Guess we've come full circle.


Gotta run to the farmers market for veggies and blueberries before they close down.  


 

 

NanaC's picture

(post #30776, reply #81 of 114)

My DDs loved it, but still begged for Kraft, like their friends had, and I occasionally gave in. 


I can still hear my DD's voice, about age 7-8, (you reading this, Elizaram?) whining that all the other kids had their sandwiches on Sunbeam bread... How come she had to eat my yucky homemade white bread?  LOL


Then there was the tussle over why she couldn't have Twinkies for dessert in her lunchbox like the other kids in her class, instead of my home made cookies...

Fran

"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"

elizaram's picture

(post #30776, reply #87 of 114)

you reading this, Elizaram?


LOL! Well you have to admit, my taste has gotten a little more refined since then! The bread thing was a texture issue, though. Homemade bread was chewy and had thick crusts - nothing like the fluffy squishy bread everyone else was eating!


I also remember looking forward to those church potluck suppers, because there were all sorts of exotic dishes we never got to eat at home - barbecued meatballs, hamburger hotdish, green bean casserole, and those abominable fluffy desserts with Jello and Cool Whip and mini marshmallows in them.


I think we all have our secret "comfort food" guilty pleasures, though. My holdovers from childhood are Cheez-Its, sour cream and onion potato chips, canned tomato soup, and yes, boxed mac and cheese.  :-)



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

NanaC's picture

(post #30776, reply #90 of 114)

 Well you have to admit, my taste has gotten a little more refined since then!


It certainly has!  If anyone had told me 30 years ago that my DD would be eating the exotic foods you now love I would have called him a liar.


I also remember looking forward to those church potluck suppers...


Would you believe they haven't changed much?  And the red and orange Jello salads still show up on a regular basis too!  GAG


I think we all have our secret "comfort food" guilty pleasures, though.


Oh yes!  When I saw DS yesterday, shortly after I dropped off DH (Chef Robert) for his flight to WI, he asked if I had gotten my KFC fix yet!  LOL!!!  I'm afraid I'll have to take the blame for your Cheezit, Campbell's Cream of Tomato, and Kraft Dinner fixations.  Well, at least we raised you two on mostly home grown veggies.  Do you still eat most of the peas right out of the shell before they can make it to the pot?  Or perhaps DGS has taken over that duty.

Fran

"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"

MadMom's picture

(post #30776, reply #91 of 114)

Yes, we do all have our "guilty pleasures."  One of mine is the Campbell's Cream of Tomato soup.  I know that homemade tomato soup tastes better, but there's something about the Campbell's that brings back memories of childhood.  It's a true comfort food.  I think just about everybody here has admitted to their guilty pleasures at one time or another.  Sounds like your daughter has grown up just fine!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Marcia's picture

(post #30776, reply #83 of 114)

It seems to me that I sounded most awfully priggish, and I do so dislike that quality. Heaven only knows, I have my own guilty pleasures. And I'll bet Kraft Dinner as it's so quaintly called, has been around longer than we know. Might just do a little googling about it.


Your Greek upbringing and family sounds warm and wonderful. I think lots of kids miss that, and the food that went with it these days.

Lexi's picture

(post #30776, reply #84 of 114)

I didn't take it that way at all, and my occasional mac & cheese relapse isn't one of my guilty pleasures -- I'm not in the least bit ashamed of it!  LOL! 


 

 

DeannaS's picture

(post #30776, reply #92 of 114)

We visited my husband's 99 year old grandma last weekend. We spent the night and were staying for lunch. So, his aunt (who lives there too) said, "Great, we'll have tuna noodle casserole."

I was a bit trepidatious - wondering what the heck this concoction would be. I'm actually a pretty picky eater, and was steeling myself to eat whatever was put in front of me.

Turns out, it's Kraft Mac and Cheese, with cream of mushroom soup and peas and a can of tuna. Ew.

Luckily, I have a picky toddler, and since they were doing two batches of it, I innocently asked if we could leave one batch without the soup and tuna, because we KNOW the kiddo will eat mac and cheese (though usually home made), and we know he doesn't like tuna.

I've never thought it would be a relief to eat Kraft. But, it sure was that day. ;)

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Marcia's picture

(post #30776, reply #93 of 114)

Oh, my. I've never heard of such a thing, but I can see how plain Kraft mac and cheese would be an improvement.  I do wonder where that concoction came from...twisted minds is my notion. You saved the day, but only in a manner of speaking. LOL


I love canned tuna, but just can't stand it hot or even warmed. Just as well, I suppose.


 

MadMom's picture

(post #30776, reply #94 of 114)

I can tell you exactly where concoctions like that come from.  When Ray and I were first married and poor as churchmice, we often had something he called "glop."  It might have been tuna glop or chicken glop or hamburger glop, but it consisted of a wee bit of meat (tuna was very cheap back then, so unless we had leftovers, it was tuna), some form of pasta (noodles, macaroni, whatever was on sale), some form of Cream'o'Crap soup, and cheese.  Mix it all together and bake it.  If we were fortunate enough to have any leftover veggies, they went in there.  I hate to say it, but it's comfort food and there are still occasions when we have it now...reminds us of how far we've come and how lucky we are. 



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jean's picture

(post #30776, reply #96 of 114)

Well spoken! You can tell we are contemporaries (close anyway)

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need