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MadMom's picture

Y'all know me...I cannot resist anything which is free.  So, I brought home a Central Market marinated pork tenderloin.  I chose the one which I thought was least offensive, which was a herb-dijon.  Here's my question.  How on earth do I cook the thing?  Should I brown it first, toss it in a hot oven (how hot and for how long), slice it into medallions, or what?  I know, I, too, would rather mix my own marinade, but what can I say...it was free, and it is going to be dinner tonight.



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Gretchen's picture

(post #30776, reply #31 of 114)

What is soy paste?  I have some. Where should I use it.  Thanks.

Gretchen

Gretchen
samchang's picture

(post #30776, reply #32 of 114)

Soy paste is light soy thickened with starch to the consistency of oyster sauce.


Seems odd that changing the texture should change the taste, but it does. It is less salty, more savory than straight up soy sauce. Use it as a component in stir-fries in the same quantity as oyster sauce. You could also use it as a dip for dumplings. Not traditional, but it works.

Wolvie's picture

(post #30776, reply #36 of 114)

it's probably plebian, but I really like Pearl River Bridge's mushroom soy. And their regular soy. I also have kikkoman and Whole food's tamari - I think that's Eden Brand. I just bought that to see the difference.


I have tried the dark soy from an asian store (forget the name, which I would have to spell as there is NO WAY I could pronounce it) and found it too sweet for me - that added sugar thing.


Kecap manis is sweet as well, so I use it sparingly.


I'm going to look for the paste - I did finally grab some chinese black vinegar and fermented black beans. :-)



Your first job is to prepare the soil. The best tool for this is your neighbor's garden tiller. If your neighbor does not own a garden tiller, suggest that he buy one.


Dave Barry





 

 

Heather's picture

(post #30776, reply #44 of 114)

I couldn't find anything called "soy paste" at the Asian market I went to today. Is "Thick Soy Sauce" by Koon Chun the same thing?

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #30776, reply #45 of 114)

From samchang in another thread: "

Chinese black vinegar, alas, has a taste of its own, unreplicated by any other. It should be easy enough to find nowdays, though. Also, soy paste is not the same as soy bean paste: the latter is thick, while the soy paste pours out of a bottle, with just a little looser consistency than oyster sauce. Soy paste is just thickened soy sauce, but that thickening does wonders for the tecture of the sauce. It lets the sauce stick around in the mouth and is not that sharp or salty. Rather, it is quite mild and savory. It is hard to describe the flavor, actually."

 


 


I have been searching for the following with not success, yet.


Bean Sauce
After soy sauce is brewed, the soybean pulp is removed from the vats and made into several types of condiments. The first is Bean Sauce, (sometimes called Brown Bean Sauce or Soybean Condiment). Use this rich condiment to replace soy sauce where a thicker gravy is desired. Especially good used as a marinade for roasted meats.

 

 
Heather's picture

(post #30776, reply #46 of 114)

They had Bean Sauce, but I didn't see Soy Paste. But last night I found another post from samchang where he describes the Soy Paste bottle so I think I should be able to find it now.

samchang's picture

(post #30776, reply #47 of 114)

I've never used that brand. But some products called "thick soy sauce" may be what Hokkien style sweetened soy sauce, which Indonesians adopted to make their kecap manis. On the other hand, it may indeed be soy paste. Isn't this translation thing grand?! But the bottle shouldn't be too expensive--why not give it a try and report back?

Heather's picture

(post #30776, reply #48 of 114)

I just opened it. This looks like thin, very dark molasses; smells like molasses and tastes like salty molasses. I don't think I'd want this as an ingredient in anything I'd have to eat.


Edited 6/29/2005 2:05 pm ET by Heather1

TracyK's picture

(post #30776, reply #50 of 114)

I bought the same stuff, thinking it was the soy paste! It's vile.


And it most definitely is not miso.


Squirrels are just rats in cuter outfits.
       -- Carrie Bradshaw

Heather's picture

(post #30776, reply #52 of 114)

I should have read all the messages before I replied, didn't see yours.
What in the world would anyone use that stuff for?! Mine is going right into the trash.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #30776, reply #49 of 114)

Are you not talking about miso

Heather's picture

(post #30776, reply #51 of 114)

Nope, my husband is Japanese and we eat lots of miso--I definitely know what that looks like. This is in a jar--pourable, sweet and nasty.

Edited to say that I stopped in at a different Asian market on the way home today and found Kimlan Soy Paste. I haven't had time to taste it yet.


Edited 6/29/2005 9:28 pm ET by Heather1

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #30776, reply #53 of 114)

Sorry, I guess once again I confused.  I meant when you were searching for soy paste, did you mean miso.  I was not implying that what you got was miso.

Heather's picture

(post #30776, reply #54 of 114)

Ooops, I misunderstood. I found the soy paste today--it is Chinese, comes in a bottle. It is thickened soy and a little more mellow in flavor. It has the consistency of oyster sauce. This all started because Samchung posted a salad dressing recipe using soy paste. (22853.8)

Geoffchef's picture

(post #30776, reply #33 of 114)

Kikkoman is my standard light soy too. The dark I have is from our Chinatown, and about the only English words on the bottle are: "Dark Soya Sauce". It's a richer, heavier flavour, almost like it's reduced, but as Samchang has said less salty. We also get mushroom soy here, which is dark with an earthy mushroom taste.
I use Kikkoman in places that freak some people out. Tonight I got home from work and asked DW what was for supper. She said: "Whatever you want to make!", so I got foraging. Put some pasta water on to boil and started chopping. Threw some sliced mushrooms in a pan with some evoo, butter, salt and pepper, added some minced shallots and garlic, deglazed with some red wine, tossed in some chopped sun dried tomatoes reconstituted in sweet vermouth, maybe 6 oz. of chicken stock and one of soya sauce and reduced to a bit more than a glaze. Stirred in some Aleppo pepper, a few knobs of butter and maybe a Tbsp of lemon juice. Tossed with pasta and Reggiano. Turned out lovely.

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

samchang's picture

(post #30776, reply #34 of 114)

Hey, whatever works! I've snuck soy sauce in gravies that were too thin, although I usually use fish sauce for that. I'll splash in some fish sauce in soups, braises, even salad dressings. Stir in soy sauce in mayo for an interesting spread, too.

Apaprently soy sauce has made the cultural leap. It is now a pantry staple in Mexico and Peru (they also have Maggi Sauce widely available in their stores) where it is used quite liberally. Frijoles con salsa de soja, anyone?

Geoffchef's picture

(post #30776, reply #38 of 114)

Once in a while Phyllis cleans out the fridge and fries up everything with rice. That gets liberally sprinkled with Maggi Hot.

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #30776, reply #35 of 114)

Dark soy is my default marinade for pork or salmon to toss on the grill when I have no plans.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Fledge's picture

(post #30776, reply #39 of 114)

oh yeah, and swordfish too.  I haven't had that in a long time.


Would you believe hubby is considering buying a gas grill? Not a little one mind you, one of those big honkin stainless steel ones.


sittin in la la waiting for my ya ya, uh huh....

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

Geoffchef's picture

(post #30776, reply #40 of 114)

I jumped on the gas wagon 20 years ago, and only rediscovered charcoal last year. It's been a relearning experience, but last week I cooked the best chicken I've ever tasted in my life over lump charcoal.
My lovely Weber gas grill is now my fallback when I don't have time to start charcoal, or my overflow when I have too many dishes to fit on the CharBroil.
Gas is good, but real fire is the only road to sublime.


 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Fledge's picture

(post #30776, reply #41 of 114)

My thoughts too.  But impromptu is what we are thinking about.  I just don't think having the thing as big as a coffin is called for with gas.

sittin in la la waiting for my ya ya, uh huh....

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

Geoffchef's picture

(post #30776, reply #42 of 114)

You know it's a guy thing - everything tastes better with testosterone!

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Fledge's picture

(post #30776, reply #43 of 114)

ah, gotcha. I will shut up about the whole thing.

sittin in la la waiting for my ya ya, uh huh....

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

Lexi's picture

(post #30776, reply #26 of 114)

Double yum.

 

 

Risottogirl's picture

(post #30776, reply #55 of 114)

SO brought home marinated chicken breasts once (from a very high quality shop) and my frugal yankee upbringing would not allow me to just chuck them. They were terrible, had a chemical flavor. Now when I am at someone elses home, I can always tell if something was bought pre-marinated. Eeew.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay


Edited 6/29/2005 10:17 pm ET by RISOTTOGIRL

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Geoffchef's picture

(post #30776, reply #56 of 114)

I can relate. DW recently brought home French's Dijon mustard - and she likes it!

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Heather's picture

(post #30776, reply #57 of 114)

A friend served us pre-marinated pork tenderloin once and raved about it. It had a very nasty texture--sort of pre-digested--as well as a chemical taste. Do these people have different taste buds, or what? Can't they taste that?

Adele's picture

(post #30776, reply #58 of 114)

Someone must like it, because there will be tons of the flavored ones and only a few untreated in the grocery stores.  I now buy the big ones at Costco and cut them myself. 

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

ChefRobert's picture

(post #30776, reply #59 of 114)

There is a huge segment of the population that has no clue what well prepared quality food tastes like.  This is sad.  Eating is becoming less and less of a pleasure for many people and only a necessity to be taken care of as quickly as possible with the least amount of fuss.  Bob

What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!

What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!

Heather's picture

(post #30776, reply #60 of 114)

It's really sad isn't it. They are missing out on so much. With the schedules that many people have to keep these days with work/commute/childcare--I understand that something has to give. But I know people without any of these obligations who just don't seem to have any discernment.