NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Colored butter beans

leonap's picture

I picked up a bag of these today from a little market. Never heard of them. They look like a flat pinto, a little larger and darker. The lady who worked there said they take about as long to cook as pintos. I googled and found one recipe that had you cook them with green beans for 30-45 minutes. I read on another site that they are the same as speckled butter beans. That sounds more familiar to me. Someone said if you pick them before they become speckled, they cook a lot quicker. Anyone familiar with them?

hambiscuit's picture

(post #38080, reply #1 of 30)

Are they fresh, frozen or dried? I've been eating them my whole life and love them. Colored BB are the same as speckled BB. Dried (any beans)will take longer to cook, but BB perhaps not as long as dried pintos, IMO.


Mix with green beans? I don't think so! Yuck! Now, mix with field peas or crowder peas and that's a different story....yummy!

leonap's picture

(post #38080, reply #2 of 30)

They're dried. Do you season them with pork? Oh, I love crowder peas! Hardly ever see them. I cooked some pintos that I got at the Farmer's Market this past week and I do believe they were the best I've ever had!

Gretchen's picture

(post #38080, reply #3 of 30)

There are speckled butter beans. I'd guess they'll take longer than 45 minutes if they are dried.

Gretchen

Gretchen
leonap's picture

(post #38080, reply #5 of 30)

Thanks!

Regality's picture

(post #38080, reply #20 of 30)

Lordy, jes cain't hep myself.  Every time I see the thread title I think it's some kind of bean reserved for the NAACP.  

leonap's picture

(post #38080, reply #22 of 30)

Yeah, yeah. The name gives me pause too, but that is the name on the bag. :-)

hambiscuit's picture

(post #38080, reply #4 of 30)

You can season with pork, or be sensible and use fat free boullion.  I'm not too sensible with some things. ;-)

leonap's picture

(post #38080, reply #6 of 30)

Hey, I think of beans as super foods. Surely their benefits cancel out the fat in the pork! :-) Thanks!

TracyK's picture

(post #38080, reply #7 of 30)

This may be kind of a "duh" to some folks, but this method for cooking "Southern field peas" (of all kinds) turns out a delicious, meltingly tender bean. Yummy. I could eat this all by itself, as dinner (and I have!).


http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Randy-Evans-Southern-Peas


I don't generally have ham hocks around, but I have taken to keeping country ham bits in the freezer just for this recipe. I've used fresh and/or frozen beans and it always tastes wonderful.



We are all in the same boat, you and me and ex-Gov. Palin and Rep. Joe Wilson, and wealth and social status do not prevail against disease and injury. And now we must reform our health insurance system so that it reflects our common humanity. It is not decent that people avoid seeking help for want of insurance. It is not decent that people go broke trying to get well. You know it and I know it. Time to fix it.

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

leonap's picture

(post #38080, reply #9 of 30)

Yes, but "duh, me" not "duh, Tracy." The realization that this treatment would bring out the best in any bean or pea is my "duh" moment. I use ham shanks. I don't know if there is a difference between shanks or hocks. I do think the shanks alone are enough for pintos. I have used country ham for pintos a lot too. The only thing is sometimes country ham will have a certain whang to it and though it doesn't ruin the beans, it's disappointing. Anyway, I will cook the colored butter beans per the link you provided and report back. Thanks!

TracyK's picture

(post #38080, reply #12 of 30)

Oh, it was a "duh, Tracy" moment when I first saw that recipe, believe me! :) The rest of that article is worth a read too... basically a paean to field peas, which I adore in most all forms.


Our grocery stores do carry frozen crowder peas, and frozen blackeyed peas as well.



We are all in the same boat, you and me and ex-Gov. Palin and Rep. Joe Wilson, and wealth and social status do not prevail against disease and injury. And now we must reform our health insurance system so that it reflects our common humanity. It is not decent that people avoid seeking help for want of insurance. It is not decent that people go broke trying to get well. You know it and I know it. Time to fix it.

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

leonap's picture

(post #38080, reply #14 of 30)

I'll be sure to read the article. Thanks!

Gretchen's picture

(post #38080, reply #11 of 30)

Even some bacon and onion will help them along.  ;o)

Gretchen

 

Leona,if your country ham has a "whang" it may be past its prime, in my opinion.  ;o)  And it might be from the fat, more than the meat. It can get a little strong sometimes (dare I say "rancid").


Edited 11/7/2009 10:43 am ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
leonap's picture

(post #38080, reply #18 of 30)

Tracy, are you referring to an article written by Randy Evans? I couldn't find it.

Marcia's picture

(post #38080, reply #8 of 30)

I'd season with pork, too, and since they're dried you just cook them until tender. It's hard to tell about dried beans.

A neighbor of my mother's used to grow tiny purple butter beans -- I haven't had any dried nor seen them elsewhere, but I wonder if what you have could be the purple variety? They were better than the speckled ones and I like those, too.

I'm with you -- just love crowder peas but it's hard to find them here.

leonap's picture

(post #38080, reply #10 of 30)

These are brown and more the size of an October bean, but maybe what you describe is the way they start out. We may never know unless one of us grows them. I'll wait and see how much I like them before I think about growing them. :-)

I used to go to Food Lion just for the frozen crowder peas. I don't know if they still carry them or not. Will have to check soon. They have a certain earthy flavor that I just adore. I don't know why they aren't more popular.

Marcia's picture

(post #38080, reply #13 of 30)

I wasn't familiar with October beans and after googling, I think they're larger than the purple butter beans. Southern peas are confusing even to Southerners!

I used to find frozen crowders labeled as field peas, which is what they are, but now I find the same packs and they contain black eyed peas, which I dislike. When I was growing up in Georgia, crowders were very popular, but people get out of the habit of cooking them and they are forgotten. That's one theory.

Do you find purple hull peas? I think they're very similar to crowders but we don't get them much here, either.

leonap's picture

(post #38080, reply #15 of 30)

It's been a while since I've had October beans, but I thought they were a pinto bean wannabe. I thought crowder peas and field peas were different. I'll have to try field peas again. I think I've seen purple hull peas, maybe at the Farmer's Market. The grocery stores have really scaled the varieties of frozen vegetables back. I guess they need all that room for the frozen prepared foods. Ugh!

Marcia's picture

(post #38080, reply #16 of 30)

If I'm not mistaken, crowder peas, black eyed peas and purple hulls are all types of field peas, with field peas being the more inclusive term. I actually have a whole book about vegetables with an entire section devoted to the so-called Southern pea, and the author says people still disagree about what is what.

It's not such a heated topic in NJ. LOL

leonap's picture

(post #38080, reply #17 of 30)

Ah, the things one learns on this forum! lol.

hambiscuit's picture

(post #38080, reply #26 of 30)

Right, all of those are types of field peas. My favorite field pea is "Dixie Lee". 'White Acres' are a sorry excuse for a field pea.

Gretchen's picture

(post #38080, reply #27 of 30)

In a recent Food and Wine there is a nice salad of sliced tomatoes with blackeye peas and red onion and a vinaigrette. In the introduction they refer to all these peas as "shell beans", meaning a bean that is shelled.  Have heard of "shelly" beans--but I think my inlaws really used that name to refer to a particular kind of "bean"--served with green beans and onions, as I recall.

Gretchen

Gretchen
hambiscuit's picture

(post #38080, reply #28 of 30)

I always understood the 'shelly' beans to be the little white beans inside the thicker type snap beans, such as 'half runners'. Not really sure though.... the meaning  could vary depending on  locality.

Gretchen's picture

(post #38080, reply #29 of 30)

That's it. Thanks.  Agree!!   ;o)   But they do refer to "shell beans" in this article as all the others. Just more fodder for the fire!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
Aberwacky's picture

(post #38080, reply #30 of 30)

That's what I know "shelly beans" as, too. 


Leigh


"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them."
-Leo Tolstoy
"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
bldrbill's picture

(post #38080, reply #19 of 30)

There are many varieties of colored butterbeans (limas).  I grow a black seeded one that I have been saving the seeds from for over 15 years and I got them from a man who had saved them for over 50 years.  We like to boil them in chicken stock to avoid the grease from pork and they are delicious.  They make a dark pot liquor and should be served with cornbread.  Bill 

leonap's picture

(post #38080, reply #21 of 30)

That is neat that you and your friend have saved and planted this same bean for so long. It must be really good. Definitely a cake of cornbread with a pot of beans! Thanks for your reply.

Marcia's picture

(post #38080, reply #23 of 30)

Your butterbeans sound wonderful, and I agree that they are best when served with cornbread. It's a fine combination.

Sometimes I make a stock from a ham hock and place in the refrigerator until the fat congeals. This works well to get rid of the fat factor and the stock freezes nicely, too.

bldrbill's picture

(post #38080, reply #24 of 30)

Thanks Marcia--I've never tried that with a ham hock, but I do it when I make chicken stock, chill it and skim off the fat.  The beans are also good cooked with a smoked turkey wing, you get good flavor without the fat.  Bill

Marcia's picture

(post #38080, reply #25 of 30)

Thanks for the suggestion. I've actually tried a smoked turkey wing and was not happy with the results, but ham hocks vary, too, and this may not have been a flavorful wing. Perhaps I'll try that again, Bill.