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Christmas Morning Traditions - FR & NFR

sashadog's picture

One of Gretchen's post made me think about this....I know one of your's now!

I love sweet things so if we're at home and not at my parents I'll make scones or muffins, or perhaps buy an Apple Strudel from a local German Bakery wehre they make their own puff pastry (mmmmmmm!)...There has to be cheese and crackers, and of course cookies and chocolate, and Sugar Plum Fairy tea always speaks to me of Christmas - I love that stuff! I may do either an egg strata, but usually make slow scrambled eggs with feta for hubby as he's not too keen on my sweet breakfast ideas! Lots of Christmas music, a long walk with our dog, and wine in the afternoon before dinner...and, of course, we have to watch It's a Wonderful Life - my fav!

Be the change you want to see.
dlish's picture

(post #31795, reply #1 of 142)

It's not Christmas morning unless there are TAMALES! Our family usually serves scrambled eggs, maybe some bacon and my dad's most excellent mashed pinto beans along side. We also get the good tortillas from the local really good Mexican food hole in the wall.

whatscooking's picture

(post #31795, reply #8 of 142)

It's not Christmas morning unless there are TAMALES! Our family usually serves scrambled eggs, maybe some bacon and my dad's most excellent mashed pinto beans along side. We also get the good tortillas from the local really good Mexican food hole in the wall.

 


I'd sure like to wake up at your house on Christmas morning!  Mexican food for breakfast is such a treat.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

sashadog's picture

(post #31795, reply #13 of 142)

That sounds like my kind of breakfast!

Be the change you want to see.
courgette's picture

(post #31795, reply #15 of 142)

We have a big crystal bowl of fresh berries. This started one year when berries were cheap and the kids loved it so much it became our tradition and now I spend the 23rd and 24th running around town trying to find fresh berries. Some years they are not easy to find in the northland.

With the berries we have cinnamon and marmalade buns from the oven that I made the day before. Orange juice with champagne-I used to get almost the whole bottle but now the girls want some too so this year I guess we'll need two bottles If Mom's gonna be able to drink Champagne all day. Trust me after staying up almost all night to get things done, I need it. Every year I swear I will get to bed earlier. Last year was the best ever, I think it was 1 am. Some years its been as late as 5. And coffee, lots of strong coffee.

We open the stockings, have breakfast and then do gifts. Turkey around 4 or 5. Sometimes with friends, sometimes just us. No family, they're all in Nova Scotia. My parents and brother were coming this year but didn't make the final decision until 20 minutes before they were told oldest grandson was getting married on Christmas Eve. Something about a baby in May....Needless to say, they're not coming.

The one big tradition in our family is new jammies from Granny and Papa that they open on Christmas Eve and wear to bed.

Mo

Aberwacky's picture

(post #31795, reply #17 of 142)

I grew up with a strange one--chili dogs after the Christmas Eve service at church.  Can't remember how it started, but it's not Christmas without them.


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Nightrider's picture

(post #31795, reply #18 of 142)

I am in a strange place with Christmas right now.  I am a newlywed, and so my DH and I will be starting our own traditions this year.  My family is Mennonite (not Old Order), and we follow the German tradition of opening gifts on Christmas Eve.  That is one of my most cherished traditions...lots of nibbly food and candles, Handel's Messiah on the stereo, opening a few gifts with my family.  DH is Italian Catholic, so Christmas Eve for his family is just one giant seafood-fest (no meat on Christmas Eve for catholics), with the stereotypical gift frenzy on Christmas morning.


It will be interesting to see what traditions the 2 of us develop.  We're putting up our first tree tomorrow!


Laura

TracyK's picture

(post #31795, reply #19 of 142)

My family has always made "pigs in blankets" ... sausage links browned and wrapped in crescent roll dough from a tube, LOL. It's the only time I ever enjoy the stuff... but it certainly isn't Christmas without them!


Lately I've been adding to the mix with the cranberry-orange variation of Mean's Buttermilk Scones, which are a HUGE hit with the family.


Squirrels are just rats in cuter outfits.
       -- Carrie Bradshaw

Millie's picture

(post #31795, reply #109 of 142)

Christmas morning this year we are finally going to try a "wife saver" - an overnight soaked french toast dish... I am also going to make a savoury version, a strata I guess.


We normally wouldn't get to oven-bake anything in the morning because there's always a 30-35 pound turkey in there, roasting away.  We now have two ovens in the kitchen (a baker's dream come true!) so we can try something new.


And Christmas morning is not Christmas morning without Irish cream and coffee!

MadMom's picture

(post #31795, reply #110 of 142)

And Christmas morning is not Christmas morning without Irish cream and coffee!


How is it that I never thought of that...sounds wonderful!


Edited to say that it's good to see you post.  Welcome to CT!




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!


Edited 12/8/2005 10:16 am by MadMom

Gretchen's picture

(post #31795, reply #111 of 142)

Here is the one we have made every Christmas--and now our children do it at their homes.


It is a very old recipe--from a 60's Jr. League cookbook. And of course, there are many variations in this day and time.


You can use sausage, chopped ham, or cooked bacon as you wish. We can get "ham sausage" which basically ground smoked ham. That is delicious in this--brown it first.
The dish puffs up and is golden brown and crusty on top. Delicious.


8 (or more ) slices bread, crusts removed, buttered and cut in fourths
2 1/2C milk
4 eggs
1tsp. dry mustard
1# sausage, browned, drained and crumbled?
1/2# gellow cheese, shredded


Grease a 2qt. caserole. Place a layer of bread in the bottom, cover with half the cheese ahd half the meat. Repeat layers. (Depending on your bread size, you may need more than 8 slices).
Beat eggs, milk, mustad.  Pour over bread layers.
Let sit in refirgerator 12-24 hours, covered. Or it may be frozen.  Thaw before cooking
BBake at 350* for 1 hour. Put the dish in a pan of water for more even cooking, although I have done it without this.



 


Gretchen
Gretchen
Millie's picture

(post #31795, reply #112 of 142)

Now if I only knew what "gellow" cheese was, we'd be all set. 


Sounds good, Gretchen!  Thank you!  I am hoping to do something like that as well as a double layered version with my frozen blueberries and raspberries in the middle. 

Wolvie's picture

(post #31795, reply #20 of 142)

good luck - should be lots of fun!


One way we solved conflicting traditions (gift wise) such as yours was to open one gift on C-Eve, then the rest on Christmas morning. Seemed to satisfy everyone, and it is how we still do it.


Seafood feast - ah yes - very good stuff there. We usually do the nibblies on the eve, and the feast (of whatever sort) the day of.


If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons

 

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #31795, reply #21 of 142)

My DH is German, and we went through much the same when working out our joint Christmas traditions. Since we had kids, we've taken to opening presents on Christmas morning, so we're not faced with putting them to bed while their heads are racing with thought of toys not yet played with.

For food we have stollen in the afternoon of the 24th (as per DH's family), and cookies on the 25th (as per mine). Christmas Eve dinner is always cold with homemade bread, antipasti, and fancy cheeses, fish, etc.... On Christmas Day we have the traditional German goose with rotkraut and kartoffelkloese.

Marcia's picture

(post #31795, reply #23 of 142)

A happy first Christmas to you and your husband. It will be interesting to see how your traditions blend.


 

DeannaS's picture

(post #31795, reply #24 of 142)

We usually do the split - we open stockings on Xmas eve and presents on Xmas morn. It's nice because it splits things up a little, and you get a sneak peek the night before.

But, now that Soren is interested in this Santa guy, I'm not sure if we'll do that. I think we could get away with it this year (and having Xmas the week before Xmas, too). But, by next year, he's gonna wonder why Santa isn't putting stuff in his stockings when he delivers the presents.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

mslee's picture

(post #31795, reply #34 of 142)

My family always opened gifts on Christmas Eve, husband's family opened Christmas morning.  Our compromise was to each open one special gift on Christmas Eve, the rest on Christmas morning. 

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #31795, reply #41 of 142)

Stand firm.  Don't let your Christmas Eve customs get away.  We, too, always opened presents on Christmas Eve, a Scandinavian custom, with a Christmas stocking full of goodies to look forward to in the morning.  Of course, that was eons ago, and now I've had to accept the ho-hum customs of DH and his family.  Needless to say, Christmas Eve is just like any other night, and I have to grit my teeth every year.

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #31795, reply #45 of 142)

"Of course, that was eons ago, and now I've had to accept the ho-hum customs of DH and his family. Needless to say, Christmas Eve is just like any other night, and I have to grit my teeth every year."

What an unfortunate way to go through the holidays. I kind of understand what you mean, because the few times we've been able to spend Christmas with DH's family in Germany (following a similar tradition to the Scandinavian) I've been absolutely miserable. It's hard not to experience at least some part of the holidays in a way that's familiar to you, and a real shame that you and your DH didn't work on building new traditions for yourselves together.

Marcia's picture

(post #31795, reply #22 of 142)

Chili dogs after church on Christmas Eve must be one of the coolest traditions ever.


We always open gifts on Christmas morning, but anything that comes in the mail gets opened then and there. My mother thought it was important for gifts from dear, far-flung relatives, not get lost with Santa and the other Christmas goings-on. That really stood out in my mind, extended Christmas and made me extra appreciative of presents from aunts and uncles. We continue this tradition.


My very own tradition is candy canes and coffee for breakfast.

Gretchen's picture

(post #31795, reply #26 of 142)

Our tradition with the kids was they could open ONE present on Christmas Eve.  Most of our wrapped gifts weren't down yet--and the stocking, of course wasn't. So it was mostly family gifts.  So there was always this trying to decide what/who would give the coolest thing.  One year--the kids were maybe 8,6, and 4, the choices were made.  Younger son and little sister chose my sister's gifts--ALWAYS 'way cool stuff, and no different that year. Neat toys to play with. Older son (first born) chose his "Mama's (accent on the last 'ma')--DH's DM.  It was a magazine subscription!!!


We open NOthing until Christmas morning.


I'd like to tell you all another family tradition.  DH's family alll live in NC. He is the oldest, and was the first to marry and we lived 50 miles from his home. Our first Christmas, with our little 6 month old, we had Christmas at home and then went to their home for more Christmas and dinner.
The next year, we said, we need to stay home on Christmas Day--Santa is too  much to transport.  So a family Early Christmas came about. On the Saturday before the Saturday before Christmas all the family gathered at DMIL's for lunch and exchanging gifts from under "Mama's" tree.  We had fellowship, and as the grandchildren grew up, they did the distributing of the mountain of gifts--3 families.  Now we are down to their great grandchildren being marrying age this year. After the grandparents moved to the retirement home, we took turns among the siblings, as we do today in the absence of those wonderful ancestors.The "fare" is always roast beef, creamed corn, butter beans, green beans (and then whatever else is to come along from the now myriad cooks among us.)  My turn for the roast beast this year.  It will not be DSIL's rump roast!!!!


Gretchen


Edited 12/2/2005 5:58 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #31795, reply #30 of 142)

I can only imagine the look on that poor 8 year old face...a magazine subscription...it must have been tragic to him (and you) at the time.


Your Early Christmas tradition is a lovely one. I sometimes wish for a larger family, especially during the holidays, but we always remember our loved ones who're no longer with us. It makes Christmas bittersweet, but then to have a proper Christmas one needs small children, IMHO.


I know you'll have a perfectly delicious roast beast this year, and the whole family will be pleased. Except perhaps your DSIL. lol

Ricks503's picture

(post #31795, reply #117 of 142)

My work schedule makes a fixed tradition hard as I sometimes have to work christmas day and our family traditions were a bit differant.  DW's family always opened presents christmas eve, mine did it christmas morning.


Nowadays, If I am working on Christmas, we open presents christmas eve.  If I am off christmas, we open them christmas morning after a breakfast of french toast and hot chocolate.  We always do a try and guess the present before opening routine - prolongs the process and anticipation. We will have our big Christmas day dinner either mid afternoon if I am off, or I leave a DETAILED timetable and instructions so that it will be at a point whre I can add the final touches and bring everything together shortly after I get home - DW can make about 4-5 dinner dishes not counting hot dogs and boxed dinners and maybe basic hamburgers.


1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

Wolvie's picture

(post #31795, reply #31 of 142)

very cool traditions - and if you want a really cool beef roast recipe, let me know. :-)

If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #31795, reply #32 of 142)

As you know, I ALWAYS want a cool recipe, especially from you. 


 For this dinner, we started with a roast sirloin tip roast (and I can make that very well).  If I can find it at an affordable price, I "graduated" to a roast whole top sirloin roast(steak,doncha know) so I don't have to look for the "grain".  We are usually about 35 folk, mostly real eaters.  I am thinking about smoking the roast this year, but the date is the 17th, and by that time, I may be catatonic.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Wolvie's picture

(post #31795, reply #33 of 142)

...I may be catatonic


LOL - well - I hope not!


here is the recipe - pretty simple - sounds odd, but it works (don't think it would for smoking, tho):


Fillet of Beef with Paprika, Coriander, and Cumin (serves 6 - mulitply by 2 for buffet)


Ingredients


1 fillet of beef, about 3 1/2 pounds
3 tbsps paprika
2 tsps ground cumin
1 tbsp ground coriander
2 tbsps freshly ground black pepper
1 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tbsp salt


Prodecure:


Trim the filet of any visible fat and silverskin. Mix the first 6 spices togther, and spread this mixture evenly over the beef. Place meat in a large glass or plastic dish and cover. Let sit in the refrigerator for 4 days. On the 3rd day, sprinkle the salt over the meat.


To cook, let the meat sit a room temp for about an hour. Preheat stove top griddle or large cast iron frying pan and preheat oven to 350F.  Sear the fillet until brown on all sides, 6  - 8 minutes. Transfer meat to roasting pan and roast until a meat thermometer registers 120F, about 10 - 15 minutes. Let the meat rest, covered with a tent of aluminum foil, for 15 minutes, then slice thin. Serve.


This recipe is from the Williams Sonoma Complete Entertaining cook book - a great book, btw. They serve this with a sweet/hot mustard (your choice) and that wild rice/rice salad I posted for Aberwacky.


Of course, this is very rare meat - so adjust accordingly. This is a really nice dry rub, and I have played around with it with success as well, so have fun! :-)


I think these potatoes would go with it as well - I've made these - they are a hit:


http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/4209?epiSearchPage=http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/find/results?search=chipotle+mashed+potato&x=11&y=5



If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons



Edited 12/3/2005 8:02 am ET by Wolvie

 

MadMom's picture

(post #31795, reply #35 of 142)

Wolvie, that sounds delicious.  Got a question.  I'm seriously thinking of trying something other than the traditional turkey for Christmas this year, and thought of doing a filet.  Problem we have is that elder DD and DSIL like their meat rare, DH and I go just a hair above rare, younger DD likes hers medium, and her DH eats his well done (he's from Ireland, what can I say?)  I'm thinking that a filet, with the varying thicknesses it has, might be the answer.  Obviously something like a crown or standing rib roast would be out.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gretchen's picture

(post #31795, reply #36 of 142)

We have a bit of that in our family.  Usually I tuck the tail under to make it a uniform cylinder, but you are right, the tail will be better done.  Our son just takes his rare piece and nukes it a bit if it is really rare.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #31795, reply #37 of 142)

We often do beef for Christmas and sometimes a filet. DDIL like meat medium well, so I just put a portion back in the oven after I take out the whole piece. Works fine.

MadMom's picture

(post #31795, reply #38 of 142)

Well, d'oh!  Why didn't I think of that?  Also, Gretchen's nuke it idea would work...after all, you can't hurt well done meat, can you?



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

AJ12754's picture

(post #31795, reply #39 of 142)

We always have split pea soup on Christmas Eve (my kids called it green soup when they were little and I guess that's what made me think of it as Christmas-y) and Irish Soda bread.  Then we open gifts (except for stocking stuffers which are for Christmas morning) and have Christmas cookies.  Before we go to bed we leave out a cup of soup and a slice of bread for Santa (at least we always did when the kids were little).


I am sorry to report no real Christmas morning tradition -- other than coffee but I feel inspired to think up something to begin this year thanks to this thread.


"Truth is the engine of our judicial system." Patrick Fitzgerald

Cave obdurationem cordis