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chinese-style pork ribs

laurav's picture

I'm trying desperately to locate the recipe for the chinese-style pork ribs that were in the 10th anniversary insert--its amazing.  Would anyone out there happen to have it??


Many thanks!!

Li's picture

(post #30109, reply #1 of 26)

Here you go:

Chinese-Style Spareribs

Serves four to six as a main course or six to twelve as an appetizer. Yields 1/2 cup spice rub and about 2/3 cup sauce.

For the Chinese spice rub:
2 tablespoons ground coriander
2 tablespoons hot chili powder
2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon five-spice powder
1 tablespoon ground fennel seeds
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon dried red chile flakes

For the ribs:
2 full (13-rib) racks of St. Louis-cut pork spareribs (about 3 pounds each; ask the butcher to remove the breastbone and adjacent strip of fatty joints)
Kosher salt

For the Asian dipping sauce:
1/4 cup soy sauce
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

Sliced scallions for garnish

Make the spice rub: In a small bowl, stir together all the ingredients.

Cook the ribs: Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 300°F. Sprinkle and press 1?4 cup of the rub on both sides of each rib rack. Put the racks, meaty side up, on a broiling pan or a wire roasting rack set over a baking sheet. Lightly season the ribs with salt and put them in the oven. After the first hour, rotate the pan every 30 minutes (If you use two baking sheets, switch their position in the oven, too.) The ribs will sizzle gently as they cook, and they’ll become tender after about 2 hours in the oven.
To test for doneness, pick up the center of the ribs with tongs; the ends of the ribs should flop downward (this means the fat and cartilage have broken down), and a skewer inserted between the ribs should meet little resistance. If the meat between the ribs is still tough, keep cooking, checking every 15 minutes and rotating the pan.

Meanwhile, make the dipping sauce: In a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring the soy sauce, sugar, rice vinegar, ginger, and sesame oil to a simmer, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat and let cool to room temperature. The sauce will keep for about a week in the refrigerator.

Cut and serve: When the ribs are done, remove them from the oven, put them on a cutting board meaty side down (so they’re easier to slice), and slice them into individual ribs. Arrange on a platter and serve with the sauce on the side. Or, stack the ribs, drizzle with some of the dipping sauce (serve the rest on the side), and garnish with the sliced scallions.
—Steve Johnson

Central Scrutinizer; Cooks Talk moderator

Only connect.

laurav's picture

(post #30109, reply #2 of 26)

THANK YOU SOOO MUCH!!

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #30109, reply #3 of 26)

These are absolutely outstanding.  I used baby back ribs and a rib rack.  They took about 3 hours to cook.


Edited 12/11/2004 3:05 pm ET by MEAN CHEF

iguana667's picture

(post #30109, reply #4 of 26)

I made these ribs last night and they were outstanding. My only complaint is that I wish more fat had rendered-- I think cooking them a bit longer is the answer. The spice rub is wonderful and I plan to use it on other cuts of pork. I know Mean Chef has been grumbling about noone trying these-- it's your loss! I nominate these for T&T. Has anyone else tried these?

Cheers, Ig.

Gretchen's picture

(post #30109, reply #5 of 26)

I think it may be the temperature of baking. When I smoke ribs at that temp or lower, the fat just does not render out.  When I smoke chickens it is the same--I run them in a 400* oven to get the fat to drain out.  Might work the same for the ribs if that is a real problem in your mind.

Gretchen

Gretchen
iguana667's picture

(post #30109, reply #6 of 26)

Thanks for the tip! I'm not worried about the fat content, I just think the ribs would be nicer to eat without the big pockets of fat.

Gretchen's picture

(post #30109, reply #7 of 26)

And I agree.  I think the low heat makes them very succulent and if you quickly render the fat with a high heat you have the best of both worlds.

Gretchen

Gretchen
JoeB2's picture

(post #30109, reply #8 of 26)

I made these for our superbowl get-together tonight. They were delicious and a huge hit.

Definitely a keeper!

Wolvie's picture

(post #30109, reply #9 of 26)

I made the char su rib recipe from "Compleat Meat". A great type of fare for the Super Bowl - the results of which were - well, Super! :-)


I'll have to try this version next time.


Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 

 

Bethany's picture

(post #30109, reply #10 of 26)

Is this a dumb question??? What is 5 spice powder? They sound great, I have most of the ingredients, but never heard of this spice.

 


Napoleon, don't be jealous that I've been chatting online with babes all day. Besides, we both know that I'm training to be a cage fighter.

 

Napoleon, don't be jealous that I've been chatting online with babes all day. Besides, we both know that I'm training to be a cage fighter.

Gretchen's picture

(post #30109, reply #11 of 26)

It is a Chinese spice mix--very available on the spice aisle now.  I've forgotten the combo.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Bethany's picture

(post #30109, reply #12 of 26)

I guess it was a stupid question then! I have to stop at the store today, and I'll see if it's there, which I'm sure it is.

 


Napoleon, don't be jealous that I've been chatting online with babes all day. Besides, we both know that I'm training to be a cage fighter.

 

Napoleon, don't be jealous that I've been chatting online with babes all day. Besides, we both know that I'm training to be a cage fighter.

Gretchen's picture

(post #30109, reply #13 of 26)

If you don't know it sure isn't stupid to ask.  As Phil Donohue used to say, how else can we learn.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #30109, reply #14 of 26)

 Chinese 5 Spice combines the classic blend of star anise, pepper, fennel seed, cinnamon and cloves. Commercial blends often add salt and onion. I love this stuff!!

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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Bethany's picture

(post #30109, reply #15 of 26)

I have all those spices.... but I'm sure I would screw up the balance, so I'll probably pick some up today. It's tricky adding the right amount of cloves to a recipe. It's the one spice I always measure carefully.


 


Napoleon, don't be jealous that I've been chatting online with babes all day. Besides, we both know that I'm training to be a cage fighter.


Edited 2/7/2005 9:07 am ET by Bethany

 

Napoleon, don't be jealous that I've been chatting online with babes all day. Besides, we both know that I'm training to be a cage fighter.

Jean's picture

(post #30109, reply #16 of 26)

You're right...cloves have a tendency to overpower.  My DD can pick up the slightest bit in a dish. But then, she is Ms Super-nose.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Bethany's picture

(post #30109, reply #17 of 26)

Well.... after posting about how great my supermarket is..... I now find out that not only do they NOT have five spice mix, but they haven't even heard of it. I even had then check the vendor's list! I checked penzey's too.... no luck, unless I searched wrong. But I did find this, and I have all the stuff to make it:


Chinese five-spice powder = five-spice powder = five-fragrance powder = five heavenly spices = five perfumes = five-flavored powder   Notes:   Don't confuse this with panch phoron, a Bengali spice mix that's sometimes called "five spice."  To make your own:  Combine equal parts Szechwan (or black) pepper, star anise (or anise), cinnamon, cloves, and fennel, all ground    Links:  For a more detailed recipe, visit the Five Spice Powder posting on RecipeSource.com.


 


Napoleon, don't be jealous that I've been chatting online with babes all day. Besides, we both know that I'm training to be a cage fighter.

 

Napoleon, don't be jealous that I've been chatting online with babes all day. Besides, we both know that I'm training to be a cage fighter.

schnitzel's picture

(post #30109, reply #18 of 26)

Here is Penzey's:
http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-penzeyschinese5.html


McCormick has a Chinese Five Spice too.


Amy W
Cooks Talk T&T Recipes
"The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude."  Julia Child

SueL's picture

(post #30109, reply #19 of 26)

Bethany, if you can't find it, send me an email. I will get you some and some Szechuan peppercorns as well to experiment with. I have no problems finding most things, except fermented black beans sometimes are scarce (but I did find some of those as well).
~Sue

Bethany's picture

(post #30109, reply #21 of 26)

Thanks Sue! I actually have  the peppercorns. MEAN CHEF was kind enough to send me a bad a while ago, and I still have about 1/2 of the bag left. :-)


 


 


Napoleon, don't be jealous that I've been chatting online with babes all day. Besides, we both know that I'm training to be a cage fighter.

 

Napoleon, don't be jealous that I've been chatting online with babes all day. Besides, we both know that I'm training to be a cage fighter.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #30109, reply #20 of 26)

Penzey's has it.


http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-penzeyschinese5.html


Edited 2/7/2005 1:50 pm ET by MEAN CHEF

Bethany's picture

(post #30109, reply #22 of 26)

Thank you..... I don't know what went wrong when I searched. It's probably just because I'm an idiot. :-))


 


Napoleon, don't be jealous that I've been chatting online with babes all day. Besides, we both know that I'm training to be a cage fighter.

 

Napoleon, don't be jealous that I've been chatting online with babes all day. Besides, we both know that I'm training to be a cage fighter.

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #30109, reply #23 of 26)

Thanks to Li...


Wow do the ribs smell wonderful!  They are almost ready and I can not wait to taste them...no trouble at all and I made an Asian Potato Salad to have with the ribs...


Thanks for the recipe and tips.

RuthWells's picture

(post #30109, reply #24 of 26)

I heckled hubby into making these for dinner tonight since he had Presidents' Day off.  ; )  I ate way too many of them.  Delish!


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

designercook's picture

(post #30109, reply #25 of 26)

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!!!

I've made the these ribs many times and they're always a hit. SLOW oven (300) -usually longer than recipe suggests works well. They're done when you pick up the center of the rack with tongs and both sides droop down.

I've also done them on the grill with a packet of soaked woodchips though I found it difficult to manage keeping a charcoal grill at a constant temp.

Again, THANKS!

designercook's picture

(post #30109, reply #26 of 26)

One more question: Any suggestions on reheating?

Hoping to make them the day before and serve @ a party.

Thanks