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Chicken stock

Annapurna's picture

I read somewhere that Chinese chefs like to use powdered chicken stock instead of salt in their food for an extra level of flavour. I tried this for a while, and I can report that it certainly does the job; one should probably use the neutral-clavoured "Chinese" chicken stock powder, rather than the relatively highly seasoned "Western" stock powder.


I myself have switched to making my OWN chicken stock in a crock pot; I cut the wings off a chicken before I roast it (nobody around here likes them anyway cooked all brown and flinty), and chop it up along with the neck (which come attached to the organic chickens we eat) and drop it into a crockpot full of water along with a 4-clove-stuck onion, a carrot, a stalk of celery, and a few garlic cloves. It is really no trouble to produce good stock this way; i don't even bother to skim it, since I am using it in cooking anyway, I just pour it through a colander when it's done. I like to cook it low and slow for as much as two nights to get out all the gelatin; I usually try to skim off a bunch of the fat as well about halfway through the process, to keep it from developing "off" flavours. When it is ready, I freeze it in small containers to use in cooking curries, and for quick soups. It's also a lifesaver to have around if someone gets SICK; you've got good ol' chicken soup close to hand!



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Who in all her work sees God, she in in truth goes unto God; God is her worship, God is her offering, offered by God into the fire of God.


Bhagavad-Gita, Ch.4, v. 24.

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Who in all her work sees God, she in in truth goes unto God; God is her worship, God is her offering, offered by God into the fire of God.

Bhagavad-Gita, Ch.4, v. 24.