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chicken pot pie

wisekaren's picture

Now that chicken pot pie season is officially over (what glorious spring weather we are having here in Boston, at long last!), I am finally remembering to ask a question that's been brewing since winter. A local pub serves a very nice chicken pot pie inside a small hollowed-out boule (is that the right word for a crusty round bread?) instead of a standard crust or topping. How would you do this at home? Thanks,
Karen

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #30844, reply #1 of 29)

That sounds really good!  I am thinking that the hollowed-out bread might have to be baked for a while to at least seal it some.  I did that with the bread once and filled it with French Onion soup and clam chowder another time. 


 

wisekaren's picture

(post #30844, reply #2 of 29)

As I ate the filling, I was able to use my fork and knife to eat the bread with it -- delish! The bread was still soft enough to eat, but the filling definitely did not seep through it. I think the key is to use a bread with a very firm crust. But I can't figure out whether it should cook the whole time filled, or what.
Karen

DeannaS's picture

(post #30844, reply #3 of 29)

My guess is that they made a stove-top chicken pot pie filling, and filled the pre-baked and hollowed boule just before serving.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Gretchen's picture

(post #30844, reply #6 of 29)

Agree with Deanna--not baked in the bread--just filled.  Would be really good. Thanks for the idea.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Astrid's picture

(post #30844, reply #7 of 29)

Soup in a bread bowl,that is a nifty idea!

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
Gretchen's picture

(post #30844, reply #14 of 29)

Soup or beef stew or----

Gretchen

Gretchen
wisekaren's picture

(post #30844, reply #8 of 29)

I think you're right. Can any recipe be done stove-top, even if it calls for oven-baking in a crust?
Karen

DeannaS's picture

(post #30844, reply #12 of 29)

I'm not sure - I rarely use a recipe. I usually just start like I'm making soup and cook all the veggies, then make it as creamy as I want at the end.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Gretchen's picture

(post #30844, reply #15 of 29)

Well, chicken pot pie certainly can since (at least mine)  is just white sauce with chicken and veggies. I make the sauce, pre=cook veggies and add the chicken. Mix all together.

Gretchen

Gretchen
ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #30844, reply #4 of 29)

I am able to buy La Brea bread and that is perfect for what you describe.  I bake it for about 10 minutes to crisp the crust and warm the interior, slice off the top and scoop out the bread leaving about a quarter inch or better wall thickness.  I bake the bread for about 5 minutes and it is ready to fill after a brief rest.  I also have available a store bread, but it takes more baking time and works fine. 


I agree that the pot pie filling is probably heated thoroughly on the stove top and ladled into the bread bowl and perhaps heated to piping hot in a very hot oven.  Worth trying and I hear that back in NC it is rather cool...enough for a bread bowl pot pie...not the case here in AZ although my crew does not mind winter food for dinner since the AC is always on...


Thanks for the idea...

wisekaren's picture

(post #30844, reply #9 of 29)

Thanks for the tip about crisping/warming the bread before filling -- I think that's important!
Karen

Lword's picture

(post #30844, reply #5 of 29)

The ones I had in restaurants are too big - almost the size of a soccer ball, but so good! If you eat all your soup you have a flavor bowl to take home. Tear up and reheat with some cheese.


I did it once mostly for the show effect but with smaller boules, halved. After pulling out all but 1/2" of the bread, brush the insides with olive oil and heat in oven for "a while" (15 minutes at 200?) to allow a bit of a crust to form in the bowls. Fill with desired soup.


We never ate that much bread at a meal so it wasn't something I tried again for soup even though it was a lovely presentation. They are nice containers if you recycle for soup or bread crisps.   


L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
wisekaren's picture

(post #30844, reply #10 of 29)

This one was about the size of large grapefruit, and I ate every last morsel!
Karen
P.S. I forgot to mention that they had sliced off a small round from the top (in order to scoop out the innards), which they then served as a "lid" -- cute and yummy.


Edited 5/6/2005 1:30 pm ET by WISEKAREN

deejeh's picture

(post #30844, reply #11 of 29)

It's reminiscent of a dip presentation that was very popular a few years ago - a spinach/sour cream concoction that was served in a hollowed-out boule, surrounded by chunks of the bread that had been removed from the boule.


deej

DeannaS's picture

(post #30844, reply #13 of 29)

There's a quicky restaurant here that serves broccoli cheese soup that way. It's not really the best soup ever, but for some reason, I get these massive cravings for it. Mmmmmm.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

sandermom's picture

(post #30844, reply #20 of 29)

And who does that, may I ask?  I'm guessing you're not nearly old enough to remember when what is now pasta tutti on state street was the bakers room associated with the ovens of Brittany but they used to serve something they called a guthrie bun which was in fact a filling baked into a yeasted brioche type bun.  I've only had a couple and I was much younger and not nearly as good at deciphering food construction but I was intrigued that they used something that looked for all the world like shredded wheat to fill the moist innards.

Klaatu Barada Nikto

DeannaS's picture

(post #30844, reply #24 of 29)

I'm not that young. I remember when it was Ovens.

It's Amy's - on Gilman, that does that. The bread bowl itself is really good - crunchy crust and moist interior. The soup used to be good, but now I suspect it's not exactly home made. But, so it goes. It's cheap and convenient for those days that I forget to bring my lunch to work. :)

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

RheaS's picture

(post #30844, reply #16 of 29)

The filling for the Fine Cooking chicken pot pie http://www.taunton.com/finecooking/pages/c00195_rec01.asp) is excellent.

wisekaren's picture

(post #30844, reply #17 of 29)

But how would I adapt that recipe? Just ignore the final 50 minutes of cooking? In other words, is that only to cook the pastry, or does the filling need it?
Karen

Gretchen's picture

(post #30844, reply #18 of 29)

You just make it, heat it on the stove, heat your breads a bit, put the pot pie mixture in and then maybe run it back in the oven for 10 minutes or so.  Everything is cooked--it just needs to be serving temp.


The roasted veggies sound wonderful of course, but I just nuke mine to cook.


Gretchen
Gretchen
wisekaren's picture

(post #30844, reply #19 of 29)

I'm going to try it, thanks!
Karen

elizaram's picture

(post #30844, reply #25 of 29)

The filling for the Fine Cooking chicken pot pie http://www.taunton.com/finecooking/pages/c00195_rec01.asp) is excellent.


Ohh, I remember that recipe. It took forever!! I made the mistake of trying it when I was a brand new mom with a very demanding baby. On the first day I roasted the chicken and veggies, then ran out of time. On the second day, I boned and cut up the chicken and made the sauce. On the third, I made the puff pastry and then finally baked it. I had a friend who was calling daily to see how I was doing with the new baby, and I took a lot of teasing on the third day when I was still working on the same dinner!


The pie was VERY delicious though. ;-)



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

Lword's picture

(post #30844, reply #21 of 29)

With that cute lid is the way I've had it served in restaurants, but I just cut one boule in half when I made it for the two of us. We didn't finish the bread bowls that day as there were other sides but it's great leftover toasted or in soup.

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
Eisje's picture

(post #30844, reply #22 of 29)

This reminds me of the wonderful delicious clam chowder I had in San-Fransisco, in a boule with a lid on it. I wonder if they are still there. And that adds another very valid reason to want to go back for a holiday.


Now you've done it, I want something I just can't get. =(

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #30844, reply #23 of 29)

In case you all missed a post or two down, SUZ gave us another recipe for "Shrimp Baked in Bread"...I'm game when I get home to fresh seafood!


"All this talk about the chicken pot pie in the bread reminded me of this wonderful recipe."


1lb round Italian bread
3 lg cloves garlic
1/c loosely packed Italian parsley leaves
1 stick softened butter
tbs Pernod or another anise flavored liquor
1 T salt, blk pepper
1/2 lb shrimp cleaned and deveined.


Remove top of bread and hollow out make fine bread crumbs w/what you took out
Chop the garlic and parsley in a food processor, add the butter, salt, pepper and liquor, process until smooth.
Place 1/2 the shrimp in the bottom of the bread, a bit of salt and pepper and 1/2 of butter mixture sprinkle w/some bread crumbs. Repeat w/the other 1/2 of shrimp and end w/the last 1/2 of butter mixture.
Preheat oven to 400
Bake 25-30 min without the lid, add the lid during the last 5 min of baking. Cut into 6-8 wedges as an appetizer or 4-6 as main course.


Can be prepared in advance and refrigerated.
Another idea is to do it in smaller size rolls


When I looked at the date of this recipe it was 1980...a life time ago..but its still a winner today!



 

chuckkeller's picture

(post #30844, reply #26 of 29)

Would you beleive, long, long ago, our forefathers, reused, bread bowls!!! No wonder we live live longer, today. Chuck Keller


 

If, at first, you fricascee, fry, fry a hen!

chuckkeller's picture

(post #30844, reply #27 of 29)

Karen, I have been thinking about pot pie for some time. My Mom lives in your area and served me CPP onj my last visit. It was great!! Maybe we should host a PP di9nner at FleetCntr!  Chuck Keller


 

If, at first, you fricascee, fry, fry a hen!

wisekaren's picture

(post #30844, reply #28 of 29)

Well, I'm hoping that this weekend's yucky weather was an anomaly and that SPRING is really here at last! Then I won't need to think about winter comfort foods like pot pie for another six months...!
Karen

Astrid's picture

(post #30844, reply #29 of 29)

I just remembered the time I made pumpkin soup from a Sunset cookbook, and the emptied pumpkin was used as the tureen. Similar concept and also fun.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson