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TracyK's picture

(post #30474, reply #1 of 45)

Not I, but I will follow this thread with great interest... it's my favorite dish.


However, I have seen a couple different versions of it and am curious to know which you are looking for. Some have cream, some do not, some have almonds, some have cashews, others have pistachios, etc.


 



You say I'm a b---- like that's a bad thing.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #30474, reply #2 of 45)

I have recently exploring Indian food - somethinmg I know little about.  We have been going to a few times now got me started on the Butter Chicken.  Last time we were there the chef sat with us and wrote out the recipes.  Unfortunately it starts with a #10 can of tomato puree, a serving spoon of this and that etc.  I am going to experiment.


The same night we had his chicken Korma and it was fabulous.  He described it as a saffron cashew curry sauce.  Did not get the recipe, but I will work on it.


The biggest problem I find is that there are recipes for both dishes everywhere and they are all so different from each other I can't imagine them being the same.


I do know for both the butter chicken and the Korma, the chicken is marinated in a seasoned yogut mixture and cooked separately, then added to the sauce.

Biscuits's picture

(post #30474, reply #3 of 45)

Korma is simply an Indian word for braising.  That's why there are so many variations of what you know of as Chicken Korma - it literally means braised chicken, and that can encompass a whole slew of variations.


That being said, I really like this one from Julie Sahni.   The dish goes together quickly, but it needs an hour to rest, so start it early.  I like to make it early in the day, cool, put in fridge, then heat before dinner.


Mughalai Korma - serves 4



  • 1 1/2 # skinned, boneless chicken breast meat

  • 3/4 c. light vegetable oil

  • 3 c. finely chopped onion

  • 1 tbl. finely chopped garlic

  • 1 1/2 tbl. finely chopped fresh ginger root

  • 12 green cardamom pods, slightly crushed

  • 24 whole cloves

  • 4 bay leaves

  • 2 tsp. ground coriander

  • 1/4-1/2 tsp. red pepper, freshly ground

  • 1 c. plain yogurt

  • 2 tsp. kosher salt

  • 1/2 c. heavy cream

Place the chicken breasts on a cutting board and, using a very sharp knife, slice them thinly into 1/4-inch thick medallions, as for scaloppine.  Cut the medallions into 2 1/2-inch by 1 1/2-inch pieces, and set aside.


Heat the oil in a wide, heavy-bottomed pan, and add onions, garlic and ginger.  Over medium-high heat, cook until they turn pale and begin to brown (about 10 minutes), stirring constantly to prevent burning.  Add the cardamom, cloves, and bay leaves and cook, stirring rapidly, until the cardomom pods and cloves are fried and puffed and the bay leaves turn brown (about 5 minutes).  The onions should by now be light golden brown.  Add the coriander and red pepper, stir for 10-15 seconds, and add 2 tbl. of the yogurt.  Continue frying until the moisture from the yogurt evaporates.  Then add two more tablespoons of yogurt and fry.  Keep adding yogurt and frying until the whole cup of yogurt is used up (about 5 minutes).


Add the chicken pieces and saute, turning and tossing until the meat loses it's pink color (about 3-5 minutes).  Add 1/2 c. boiling water with the salt and mix.  Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer, covered, until the fillets are cooked and fork-tender (about 25 minutes).  The oil will begin to separate from the gravy, which should be fairly thick by now, and to coat the chicken pieces.  Stir in the cream and turn off the heat.  Let the korma rest, covered, for an hour before serving.  When ready to serve, heat thoroughly, check for salt, and serve. 


Serving suggestions:  serve with saffron rice or plain cooked rice. 


***************


Ancora Imparo -

Ancora Imparo -

Biscuits's picture

(post #30474, reply #4 of 45)

Mean, if you are going to start exploring Indian cooking, do you have Julie Sahni's book Classic Indian Cooking?  I wouldn't say it's the ONLY Indian cookbook you ever need, but I'd say it should be the first one you read.  She really explains the techniques for handling ingredients very well.  And I have found in my own limited experience of making Indian food at home, that with Indian cuisine techniques are very different and very precise.


This makes me hungry for Murgh Masala.


Oh, last thing.  There is another chicken/yogurt braise in this book, Dahi Murghi.  It's a little different than the one I posted, using a whole cut up chicken and some different flavorings.  If you want it, let me know and I'll post it.


Ancora Imparo -

Ancora Imparo -

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #30474, reply #5 of 45)

The chicken korma we had was in a saffron cashew curry.  It had a distinct nuttiness to it.

mlok's picture

(post #30474, reply #6 of 45)

I found one that I haven't tried yet on the "Mamta's Kitchen" site - having tried numerous other recipes from that site I suspect it would be very good. Here is the link: http://www.mamtaskitchen.com/recipe_display.php?id=10306

It is a creamy chicken curry with nine types of nuts. Sounds yummy to me.

TracyK's picture

(post #30474, reply #7 of 45)

All the variations of korma I have tried have included nuts... by far the best one (called chicken pista korma on the menu) was in a creamy saffron-scented sauce with ground pistachio nuts... delicate flavors, but amazing depth. I had the same problem as you... so many differing variations I can't imagine any of them tasting alike.



You say I'm a b---- like that's a bad thing.

SueL's picture

(post #30474, reply #8 of 45)

I haven't tried this, but it does look reasonable enough to other recipes I have seen or tried. I read through it and nothing seems out of place to my eye.

http://www.hub-uk.com/foodpages36/1760.htm

For no one - no one in this world can you trust. Not men, not women, not beasts. This you can trust. (points to her chef's knife)
Wolvie's picture

(post #30474, reply #13 of 45)

Meanie - I have made this one with lamb - it is a cashew saffron curry. Would probably work well for chicken.


I think Karen P has the shahi chicken from Jaffrey - that's probably a hit. I can't lay my hands on my book to check it out.


Korma (lamb with cashew nut curry)

Yield: 4 Servings


0.25
c
Unsalted cashews

3.00
ea
Dried hot red chilies

2.00
ea
In piece of stick cinnamon

1.00
ea
1 in cube fresh ginger

0.25
ts
Cardamom seeds

3.00
ea
Whole cloves

2.00
ea
Large garlic cloves peeled

2.00
tb
Poppy seed (white)

1.00
tb
Coriander seeds

1.00
ts
Cumin seeds

0.50
ts
Saffron threads

6.00
tb
Ghee (or melted butter)

1.00
c
Chopped onion

2.00
ts
Salt

0.50
c
Unflavored yoghurt

1.50
lb
Lamb cut into 2" cubes

2.00
tb
Finely chopped coriander

1.00
tb
Lemon juice

0.25
c
Boiling water

1.00
c
Cold water


To make the masala, combine the cashews, chilies, ginger and the cold water and blend at high speed for 1 minutes. Add the cinnamon, cardamom, cloves, garlic, poppy seeds, coriander seeds and cumin. Blend again until the mixture is completely pulverized. Set the masala aside. Place the saffron in a small bowl, pour in boiling water and let soak for at least 10 minutes. In a heavy skillet heat the ghee over moderate heat until a drop of water flicked into it sputters instantly. Add the onions and, stirring constantly, fry for 7 or 8 minutes, until soft and golden brown. Stir in the salt and the masala, then add the yoghurt. Stirring occasionally, cook over moderate heat until the ghee lightly films the surface. Add the lamb, turning it about with a spoon to coat the pieces evenly. Squeeze the saffron between your fingers, thin stir it and its soaking liquid into the skillet. Reduce the heat to low, cover tightly, and cook for 20 minutes, turning the lamb cubes over from time to time. Scatter 1/2 of the fresh coriander over the lamb and continue cooking, tightly covered for 10 minutes more, or until the lamb is tender. To serve, transfer the entire contents of the skillet to a heated platter, and sprinkle the top with lemon juice and the remaining fresh coriander.


Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 

 

UncleDunc's picture

(post #30474, reply #9 of 45)

OK, the new glasses haven't helped much on misreading titles. I read this as chicken karma and thought, wow, I didn't know chickens could accumulate good or bad karma. I thought they pretty much lived according to their chicken nature.

assibams's picture

(post #30474, reply #10 of 45)

LOL don't think it's your glasses, silly minds perhaps. I misread it the same way.

"...never forget that the first syllable of convenience is con."
Bill Bryson

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #30474, reply #11 of 45)

Just like people, there's good chickens, and bad chickens.
I felt bad for a young silkie rooster I saw at the feed store in a cage all alone.
I asked the clerk what they wanted for him and she said "God, I hate silkies. I'll give him to you - if someone doesn't take him soon..." <pantomimes drawing a knife across her throat>  of course, I took him home.


he was lovely -big dark eyes, soft silky charcoal feather with a silvery underlayer of down. He was a beautiful example of of a blue silkie, said to be one of the gentlest, calmest breeds. excellent for children, wonderful as brooders. even the males are known for their ability to raise chicks.


Unfortunately, Bob missed that memo. He was a mean, nasty, evil, little bird.
Totally ungrateful to me for saving his life. I still carry a scar on my calf where the little turd nailed me one day as I turned my back to fill their feeder.



~RuthAnn

edited for grammar - twice.


Edited 2/16/2005 2:12 am ET by Kitchen Witch

~RuthAnn

KarenP's picture

(post #30474, reply #12 of 45)

 The newest Madhur Jaffrey has regional korma.  Nawah of Dhaka's family korma, Kashmiri origins; Malay Chicken Korma, Malay-style, and Royal Chick Korma (Shahi Murgh Korma) which she labels "real Indian korma".  If you'd like one or all, I can type them up.

Wolvie's picture

(post #30474, reply #14 of 45)

I also found this for you: (same place that I had copied my lamb recipe from long ago - astray)


Korma

Categories: Indian  Vegetarian 
Yield: 4 Servings



lb
Poultry or meat

½
c
Cashews, almonds or mixture

½

Inch chopped fresh ginger

1

Clove garlic chopped

2

Green chillies (optional)

½
ts
Saffron

2
tb
Warm milk

1
tb
Ghee

2
tb
Sunflower or corn oil

1

Medium onion chopped

3
oz
Yoghurt

3
oz
Cream

½
c
Chopped fresh coriander

Salt

Lemon juice (optional)

2

Whole cardamoms

3

Whole cloves

1

Inch cassia bark

1
ts
Coriander seeds

1
ts
Cummin seeds


SPICES 1) Cut the meat into 1 inch cubes (the poultry on or off the bone, to taste) 2) Blend the nuts, ginger, garlic and chilles into a course paste with 1/4 pint of water 3) Soak the saffron in warm milk for 10 minutes. 4) Heat the ghee and oil together, then fry the spices then onion until golden. Add the nut paste and yoghurt, and cok for 10 minutes or so. 5) Add the meat, mixing in well. Simmer for about 1 hour or until the meat is tender. Add water bit by bit if needed. 6) About 10 minutes before serving, squeeze the saffron strands in their bowl to get the most colour out of them then add in, with the milk. Add the cream, fresh coriander and salt to taste. Garnish with lemon juice if liked. Notes: 1) Coriander. You may know it as "cilantro or Chinese parsley" 2) Cassia bark. Similar to cinnamon but with a sweet musky fragrance. 3) When frying the spices use a gentle heat as they are easily burnt!! True kormas are spicy, not hot, and a Moghul creation. Their special feature is a creamy sauce with nut and safron. They can be made with chicken (my favourite), duck, lamb, beef or mutton and should be served with plain or pullao rice.


Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 

 

Risottogirl's picture

(post #30474, reply #15 of 45)

I wonder why it lists "vegetarian" under the categories since the recipe contains meat.

I was 32 when I started cooking; up until then, I just ate
Julia Child

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Wolvie's picture

(post #30474, reply #16 of 45)

interesting question - I have no idea - I just copied it. ;-)

Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 

 

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #30474, reply #17 of 45)

Thank you all.  Some experimenting is in order.

ashleyd's picture

(post #30474, reply #18 of 45)

And afterwards you can go right back to trying recipes.


 


OK, OK the corner beckons.



“In victory you deserve Champagne, in defeat you need it.”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

iguana667's picture

(post #30474, reply #19 of 45)

I remember vaguely hearing an NPR piece, or reading something somewhere (egullet? The New Yorker?) about people in India keeping up a genteel pretense of being vegetarian but still eating meat. Each type of meat was listed on their grocery bill as a vegetable. I think chickens were 'moving vegetables'. Aha, here it is:
http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?s=f2797ced799c29d126eb16ac7d4407a2&showtopic=43684

StevenHB's picture

(post #30474, reply #20 of 45)

In Israel, in Hebrew, they refer to pork as "white steak."


Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
ashleyd's picture

(post #30474, reply #21 of 45)

Or giant rabbit.


“In victory you deserve Champagne, in defeat you need it.”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

StevenHB's picture

(post #30474, reply #22 of 45)

Rabbits aren't kosher, either.



Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
ashleyd's picture

(post #30474, reply #23 of 45)

All a matter of degree!


“In victory you deserve Champagne, in defeat you need it.”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

KarenP's picture

(post #30474, reply #24 of 45)

Here come your three korma recipes


                     
* Exported from MasterCook *


                 Royal Chicken Korma (Shahi Murgh Korma)


Recipe By     :Madhur Jaffrey
Serving Size  : 6     Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    :


  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  1           teaspoon  saffron threads
  4        tablespoons  cream -- heated until hot
  5            -6 tbsp  corn or peanut oil
  12              pods  cardamon
  4             medium  sticks of cinnamon
  6                     bay leaves
  5             pounds  boneless skinless chicken thighs
  2             medium  onion (about 10 ounces) -- sliced into half rings
  2        tablespoons  peeled and finely grated fresh ginger
  8             cloves  garlic -- crushed to a pulp
  4        tablespoons  whole peeled almonds
  4        tablespoons  golden raisins
  2        tablespoons  ground coriander
  1         tablespoon  ground cumin
  1                cup  plain yogurt -- lightly  whisked until smooth
  2 1/2        - 3 tsp  salt
     1/2      teaspoon  garam masala
  2          teaspoons  cayenne pepper
     1/2           cup  water


whisk the saffron in the hot cream, set aside for 2 - 3 hours


pour oil in a large, wide lidded pan heated over medium high heat


when the oil is hot at the cardamon, cinnamon, and bay leaves, stir once


add as many pieces of chicken as the pan will hold easily in a single layer, brown on all sides, remove to a bowl leaving behind as many whole spices as possible


add the onions and fry until reddish brown


add ginger, garlic, and stir for a minute


add almonds, raisins, coriander and cumin, stir once


return chicken to the pan along with any accumulated juices


add yogurt, salt and cayenne pepper


partially cover, heat over medium heat about 10 minutes


raise the heat to high, cook until most of the liquid has boiled away and a thick sauce clings to the meant


stir in cream, garam masala, and a 1/2 cup of water


cover tightly, leave on the lowest possible heat for 5 minutes


Source:
  "From Curries to Kabobs"
                                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

KarenP's picture

(post #30474, reply #26 of 45)

                     
* Exported from MasterCook *


                          Malya of Chicken Korma


Recipe By     :Madhur Jaffrey
Serving Size  : 4     Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    :


  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  2          teaspoons  white poppy seeds
  2         inch piece  fresh ginger -- peeled and chopped
  4             cloves  garlic -- chopped
     1/2           cup  shallots -- chopped
  1         tablespoon  whole coriander seeds
  2          teaspoons  whoel cumin seeds
     1/2      teaspoon  whole fennel seeds
  1           teaspoon  whole plain peppercorns
  4        tablespoons  corn or peanut oil
  1              whole  star anise pod
  1             medium  stick of cinnamon
  5              whole  cardamon pods
  1             medium  onion -- sliced in to half rings
  3 1/2         pounds  chicken -- cut into bite sized pieces
  1              pound  potatoes -- peeled and cut in to 1 1/2 inch pieces
  3             medium  carrots (about 8 ounces) -- cut into 1/1/2 inch pieces
  1             medium  tomato -- chopped
  2          teaspoons  salt
     1/4      teaspoon  cayenne pepper
  3        tablespoons  plain yogurt
  1                cup  coconut milk -- well stirred
  1 1/2       -2 tblsp  lemon juice
                        fresh mint or cilantro


soak poppy seeds in 2 tbsp boiling water for 2 hours


put the soaked poppy seeds along with their soakingliguid plus the ginger, garlic, and shallot in the food processor, blend to a paste


place the coriander seeds, cumin seeds, fennel seeds, and peppercornds in a clean coffee or spice grinder, grind to a coarse powder


pour the oil in a wide prefereably nonstick, lidded pan and set over medium high heat


when oil is hot add the star anise, cinnamon, and cardamon


stir once then add the onion


stir and fry until the onion is reddish brown


add the ginger paste and fry stirring for 2 - 3 minutes


reduce heat to medium and add ground spices. stir them for a minute


add the chicken and stir vigorously for 6 to 7 minutes or until the chicken releases its liquid


not put in the potatoe, carrots, tomato, salt, and cayenne pepper


stir a few times, add 1 1/2 cups water and bring to a boil


cover and cook over medium high heat for 15 minutes


reduce the heat to low and cook for a further 10 minutes


meanwhile, beat the yogurt in a bowl, add coconut milk and lemon juice then stir gently into the chicken


cook uncovered on a low heat for 5 minutes stirring now and then


garnish with cilantro or minut before serving


Description:
  "malaysia"
Source:
  "From Curries to Kabobs"

Wolvie's picture

(post #30474, reply #27 of 45)

all this talk of india and chicken dishes got to me yesterday - I made this last nite, mostly because I had all of the ingredients on hand:


Spiced chicken curry

Categories: Indian  Chicken 
Yield: 6 Servings


1
tb
Ghee

2

Onions, sliced

1

Clove garlic, crushed

¼
ts
Thyme

2

Bay leaves

1
ts
Cinnamon

1
ts
Cardamon

2
ts
Mace

1
tb
Ghee

1

Chicken jointed

2
tb
Curry powder

¼
ts
Cayenne pepper

1
ts
Salt


c
Coconut milk

3

Tomatoes, peeled and chopped

1
tb
Lemon juice

2

Apples, peeled and thickly sliced

½
c
Cream or sour cream


1. Heat ghee or butter, saute onions, garlic and next 5 ingredients, remove from pan. 2. add remaining ghee or butter to pan, brown chicken pieces, add next 3 ingredients. cook 2-3 minutes.

3. Add coconut milk and return onion mixture to pan. cover and simmer about 35-45 minutes, till chicken is tender, add last 4 ingredients, simmer 10 minutes.


Wolvie notes: It came out great, the chunky apples (I used granny smiths) were excellent in the sauce. I simmered a bit longer than called for at the last - maybe 30 minutes, so it reduced it a bit more.  The "curry powder" I used in this was Penzey's sweet curry powder. Instead of cayenne pepper I used thai bird chilis.


Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 

 

KarenP's picture

(post #30474, reply #25 of 45)

                     
* Exported from MasterCook *


                       Nawab of Dhaka's Family Korma


Recipe By     :Madhur Jaffrey
Serving Size  : 4     Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    :


  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
     1/2      teaspoon  saffron threads
  1         tablespoon  rose water
  1           teaspoon  kewra (screw pine) water
  2              small  onions (about 6 ounces) -- chopped
  2         inch piece  fresh ginger -- peeled and chopped
  4             cloves  garlic -- chopped
                        crisply fried onion slices made according to recipe
                        all oil saved from frying the onions
  4              small  potatoes (about 2 ounces each) -- peeled and halved
  1         tablespoon  ghee
  5              whole  cardamon pods
  1             medium  stick cinnamon
  1                     chicken -- skinned and cut into small serving pieces
     1/2      teaspoon  grated nutmeg
     1/4      teaspoon  ground mace
  6        tablespoons  plain yogurt
     3/4           cup  milk -- warmed
  1 1/2      teaspoons  salt or to taste


soak saffron threads in rose water and kewra water set aside for 2 - 3 hours


put chopped onions, ginger, garlic and 3 - 4 tbsp water into blender and blen pushing down wiht a rubber spatula when necessary until you have a smooth paste


crumble the fried onions and set aside


pour oil reserved from fried onions into large nonstick, lidded pan, set over medium heat


when hot, add potatoes, fry until lightly browned on all sides, remove with slotted spoon and set aside


pour off all burt 4 tbsp of the oil


add ghee and set over medium high heat


when hot add cardamon and cinnamon, let sizzle for a few seconds then pour in the paste from the blender


stir and fry for about 5 minutes until llightly browned


add chicken, nutmeg,  and mace.  continue to stir for a further minute


over the next five minutes, add the yogurt 1 tbsp at a time and keep browning the chicken


stir in the milk, the crumbled onions and salt, bring to a simmer


cover, reduce heat as low as opossible and simmer gently for 25 minutes turning the chicken now and then


add saffron mixture, stir well and continue to cook covered on a very low heat for five more minutes


Description:
  ""a dish in the true moghul tradition, this recipe comes from a royal Bangladeshi family of Kashmiri origins"
Source:
  "From Curries to Kabobs"
                                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


                     
* Exported from MasterCook *


                               fried onions


Recipe By     :Madhur Jaffrey
Serving Size  : 0     Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    :


  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  3             medium  onions (about 15 ounces
                        peanut or corn oil for shallow frying


cut each onion in half lengthwise , slice evenly crosswise into thin slices


shallot would be cut in a similar manner


set large sieve over a bowl and keep near cooking area


line 2 plates with paper towels


pour enough oil into a large frying pan to come to a depth of about 1/8 inch


set over medium heat


when oil is hot, put in all of the onions


stir and fry for about 8 minutes. the onions will have begun to brown


reduce the heat to low. continue to stir and fry until most of the slices are reddish brown about 12 minutes in all


remove the frying pan from the heat, empty contents into a sieve over a bowl


lift up the sieve shake it over the bowl once or twice to get rid of excess oil


empty the onions over on of the plates lines with paper towels


let them sit on the first plate about 5 minutes, move to the second plate


allow to cool completely


you can now put in a lidded jar or ziplock type bag where they will keep unrefrigerated for several weeks


for a berista the onions are crumbled or if more of a paste is desired they may be put into a clean coffee or spice grinder and ground toa coarse paste


may be frozen first as they are easier to crush


Source:
  "From Curries to Kabobs"
                                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

nkc100's picture

(post #30474, reply #28 of 45)

I tried this recipe (from "The Best Ever Curry Cookbook" by Mridula Baljikar) last week, and was one I'd certainly do again.


Chicken Korma for 4


Ingredients :


25 g blanched almods


2 garlic cloves, crushed


2.5 cm piece of fresh ginger, chopped


30 ml vegetable oil


675 g chicken breast fillets, skinned & cubed


3 green cardamompods


1 onion, finely chopped


10 ml ground cumin ( I used 5 ml ground cumin & 10 ml ground corriander)


1.5 ml ground salt


150 ml natural (plain) yogurt


175 ml single (light) cream


Toated flaked almonds & cilantro to garnish


Plain boiled rice to serve


Method :



  1. Process the almonds, garlic & ginger in a food processor with 30 ml water.

  2. Heat the oil in a wok or large pan & cook the chicken for 10 minutes.  Remove the chicken & set aside.  Add the cardamom pods & fry for 2 minutes.  Add the onions & fry for 5 minutes.

  3. Stir in the almonds, garlic & ginger paste into the cardomom & onions in the pan.  Add the cumin & season to taste with salt.  Cook for 5 minutes more, stirring frequently.

  4. Whisk the yogurt and add to the onion mixture a tablespoonful at a time.  Cook over a low heat until the yogurt has been absorbed.  Return the chicken to the pan.  Cover & simmer over a low heat for 5 - 6 minutes, or until the chicken is tender.

  5. Stir in the cream & simmer for a further 5 minutes.  Garnish with toasted flaked almonds & corriander & serve with plain boiled rice.

 

AngelinaCookalina's picture

(post #30474, reply #29 of 45)

I have one or two recipes I think you would enjoy- if I have time and can find them I will post them.  In my experience, most Indian cooking is like Southern cooking- its highly a matter of personal taste and regoinal influence.  There are usually no set proportions, only styles and methods passed down through generations until someone writes their perception of the formulation and method down and makes it official.


What you are looking for is sort of like looking for a recipe for "great fried chicken".  There are many "great" and vastly different ideas of what fried (or Khorma) chickenshould taste like.  For a good start on recipes, I like Julie Sahni.  But then again, I am northern Indian, and if you ask a Southern Indian they will probably lean towards a different author- perhaps Madhur Jaffrey.


 


 

Lword's picture

(post #30474, reply #30 of 45)

>For a good start on recipes, I like Julie Sahni.  But then again, I am northern Indian, and if you ask a Southern Indian they will probably lean towards a different author- perhaps Madhur Jaffrey.


Thank you angelina for this good advice. Is one style hotter or something particularly distinctive such as more vegetarian?  There's a spice used in many curries that I don't care for but I don't know what it is and have no good idea how to determine it.


L.
L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa