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Chardonay dry mouth.

Rich02's picture

Anyone have the problem with Chard giving you a drying out of the mouth when sleeping?  Wife switched to Pinot Grigio and no problem.  Rich

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We did what we did when we knew what we knew, now that we know better, we should do the better thing.   Maya Angelou

Syrah's picture

(post #37693, reply #1 of 9)

Did she drink more of the Chardonnay? The only reason I can think of for a dry mouth is dehydration.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained."
-Marie Curie
My perseverance will be rewarded.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

ashleyd's picture

(post #37693, reply #2 of 9)

Unlikely to be the grape itself, but possibly something in the vinification, probably maturing in oak (which they don't tend to do for Pinot Grigio). Try an unoaked Chardonnay (rare but obtainable) to see if it has the same effect.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Biscuit's picture

(post #37693, reply #3 of 9)

I was never a fan of Chardonney for that very reason until I tried an 'un-oaked' Chardonney.  I like those very much - rich and buttery without the dry-mouth after.


Ask your local wine-guy for an un-oaked vintage.  Australia and NZ have several, and I bellieve California has a couple of good ones, as well.


"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

Gretchen's picture

(post #37693, reply #4 of 9)

And French are unoaked. There are more and more from California also. They have seen the light.

Gretchen

Gretchen
ashleyd's picture

(post #37693, reply #5 of 9)

Most French Chardonnays are oaked (Eleve en futs de chene) although it is often subtle, much softer than the Australian and Californian "in your face" style but there nonetheless/


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #37693, reply #6 of 9)

I agree with Ashley in that it has something to do with the tannins and hence oak ageing.  Tannins dry out the mouth - they come from the grape pits and the oak vats, mostly.  And thus if the chardonnay has been oak-aged, then it could have loads of tannins (esp. if a young chardonnay -  over time, chardonnay with oak tends to lose the oak and get more of the chardonnay appley character) and could be drying in the mouth.  It isn't hard to find an unoaked chardonnay as Australia and so forth make quite a bit -  it's the trendy thing these days.  And a lot of French Chardonnays are indeed oaked, and you'll never see that on the label for the most part, though, so it's hard to tell which is which.  Chablis is largely unoaked.  White Burgundy, also a chardonnay, is oaked.  Just as an example.  And as was wisely said, Pinot Gris doesn't get time in oak vats, so it would be largely free of those drying tannins.  cheers, Bonnie


Edited 7/18/2009 2:43 pm ET by BonnieinHolland

Gretchen's picture

(post #37693, reply #7 of 9)

I was misinformed. Thanks.

Gretchen

Gretchen
ashleyd's picture

(post #37693, reply #8 of 9)

You're right, basic Chablis is largely unoaked, although the Grand Cru and Premiere Cru do sometimes get a little time in oak, but much less than the rest of Burgundy. Having said that Chablis tends to be a risky wine to buy as even within the same case the quality can vary considerably and our wine society has had such dreadful problems with oxidization (with Meursault particularly) that we've stopped laying it down. That really is a shame because a decent white Burgundy with a bit of age is absolutely sublime.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #37693, reply #9 of 9)

Yes, there's certainly quite a lot of consternation over the early oxidation of white Burgundy, rightly so -- I don't think the wine-makers have figured out yet what exactly the overall problem is, but I hope they do so soon because white Burgundy is one of my favorite, go-to wines!  Because of oxidation, I try not to pick up any white Burgundy anymore that's older than a couple years -- though I did grab a couple 2002 Mersault's (premier cru) this past week from work with the assurance that they're still very good indeed (I work at a wine importer/seller).  Crossing my fingers.  cheers, Bonnie