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Regality's picture

Cardamom (post #32571)

Does anyone else think that cardamom has a slightly cat-piss smell to it?  I don't remember thinking that the first time I bought it, but after that, I really noticed it.  Am I getting over-the-hill cardamom or what?


 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


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Risottogirl's picture

(post #32571, reply #1 of 57)

Really? It smells citrus-y to me.


Now eucalyptus trees (like in the Presidio) - they smell like cat-piss to me :)


 


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Aberwacky's picture

(post #32571, reply #4 of 57)

And no matter how I try to like it, fresh sage smells like B.O.  Dried is fine, though, LOL.


Leigh


 


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Marcia's picture

(post #32571, reply #5 of 57)

Hummm, I love the smell of fresh sage. LOL

Regality's picture

(post #32571, reply #6 of 57)

And eucs always remind me of being sick as a child and whatever greasy rub it was that my mother used on my chest.  Sort of a yin/yang reaction to them.  Speaking of eucs, my neighbors just took their 3 down to pillar height for the umpteenth time .  At least for a couple of years my sunny garden will actually be sunny again.  I don't understand why they don't just get rid of them and plant something that doesn't look like mutant stumps half the time.  *L*

 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


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sclbcake's picture

(post #32571, reply #2 of 57)

cardomon is my fav..I even sprinkle it in my coffee...yours must be old...throw it away !!!

Regality's picture

(post #32571, reply #7 of 57)

From what I understand, some people like cardamom and others don't--sort of like reactions to cilantro.  I may just be one of the "don'ts."  However, I'm way ahead of you on the throwing out bit. 

 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


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assibams's picture

(post #32571, reply #3 of 57)

The preground stuff is nasty, I always get pods or seeds and grind them myself. LOVE cardamom, it is the signature ingredient in Swedish sweet breads.


Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Regality's picture

(post #32571, reply #8 of 57)

I ordered some ground from Penzey's before I read your post.  I'm going to give it one more try.  At this point I'd just about decided that if a recipe calls for cardamom, I wouldn't be trying it.

 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


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MadMom's picture

(post #32571, reply #9 of 57)

I'm on of those who loves cardamom, keep it on hand whole, and grind it as needed.  I think I bought a small amount already ground at Central Market, too.  It's divine in Chai Tea.  Now I'm thirsty for some.



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Regality's picture

(post #32571, reply #10 of 57)

Well, my Penzey's order arrived yesterday and their cardamom has the same off odor as the grocery store-bought bottles did, so I guess it's just the way my brain perceives the smell, rather than a having had a couple of bad batches.  I don't remember having a problem with the taste in baked goods when I was in Scandinavia, so I'm going to try baking...er....something not too complicated and then decide what to do with the current small container.

 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


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transona5's picture

(post #32571, reply #11 of 57)

There are also lots of savory Indian recipes you can use it in.

edited for a missing word

 


Edited 6/2/2006 10:57 am ET by transona5

 

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #32571, reply #12 of 57)

I've just recently become addicted to milk chocolate-coated almonds with cardamom, made by Thomas Haas for Rangoli, Vij's bistro/take-out outlet. Weird but wonderful combination!





"Once you institutionalize thinking outside the box, it turns to dust in your hand." .
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transona5's picture

(post #32571, reply #13 of 57)

Oh my. >drool<

I'm like RG, I think cardamom is citrus-y, too. Very pleasant to my nose.

The only herb/spice/seasoning that I find nasty smelling is asafoetida/hing - but it tastes great after it's been cooked for a minute.

 

 

Regality's picture

(post #32571, reply #15 of 57)

Yes, I could, except that I just made Ina's curried chicken salad, so I'm thinking more of baked goods.  Does anyone have a quick bread recipe that stars cardamom?


 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


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Tess's picture

(post #32571, reply #17 of 57)

This isn't a "quick bread" but it is very good. I don't remember where I got the recipe, but have been making it for years:
Sweet Potato Rolls
with
Dried Tart Cherries and Cardamom
Makes 16 rolls
(or my Finnish grandmother always made cardamon bread as a braided loaf very much like challah
What you need:

1 14-16 ounce red skinned sweet potato (yam)
Note: you’ll use 3/4 cup cooked and mashed

1 cup half and half
1 envelope dry yeast
1 tsp cardamom

6 TBS packed brown sugar
1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted & cooled
2 tsp salt
3 1.2 cups bread flour plus a bit more

3/4 cup tart dried cherries, cut into small pieces and tossed with flour (Or use golden raisins)

Bakers’ parchment paper and butter to coat
1 egg or egg white mixed with a little water to glaze

What you do:

1. Pierce sweet potato in several places with fork. Microwave on High, for 7 minutes. Turn over and cook until very tender, about 7 minutes. Or bake in a conventional oven. Scoop flesh from potato into bowl and mash. Measure 3/4 cup mashed sweet potato into the bowl of an KA mixer (with whisk) and beat until very smooth.

2. Heat half and half with 1 TBS brown sugar in a small heavy saucepan over low heat to 105° to 115° F. Remove from heat and stir in yeast and cardamom to dissolve: add a spoonful of flour and let stand until yeast dissolves and it gets foamy, about 10 minutes.

3. Fit KA mixer with dough hook. Add melted butter, the remaining 5 TBS brown sugar, and salt to the sweet potato in bowl. Beat until smooth. Add yeast/half and half mixture and blend well.

4. At medium/low speed, beat in flour, a cup at a time, to form soft dough. Beat 3-4 minutes. Turn dough out onto floured surface and knead about 6 –10 minutes until smooth and elastic. Add more flour if too sticky. The dough should be soft—don’t add too much flour!

5. Knead in cherries. Butter a large bowl. Form dough into ball and turn into bowl to coat with butter. Cover with damp towel and let dough rise in warm draft-free place until doubled, about 1 1/2 hours. Note: dough is doubled when you poke it and the poke hole stays intact!

6. Butter 2 large cookie sheets, or use baker’s parchment. Punch dough down and turn onto floured surface. Divide dough in half. Roll 1 dough half into a 12” diameter circle. Work slowly and pull or gently stretch the dough if you need to. The dough needs to relax! Cut the circle into 8 equal pieces (sort of triangle shaped). Make crescent rolls: starting at the wide end of the triangle, stretching dough with fingertips if necessary, roll each section up to the narrow point. Brush the tip with glaze to seal. Put 8 rolls on each prepared baking sheet. (Repeat with the other half of the dough.) Cover rolls with a dampened towel and let rise in a warm draft-free place until light and puffy, about 45 minutes.

7. Bake one sheet at a time, or rotate the 2 halfway through bake time. Preheat over to 400° F. Bake about 15 minutes until they are golden and sound hollow when tapped on bottom. Cool on racks before wrapping. Can be wrapped and frozen and reheated in wet paper bag.

Tess's Japanese Kitchen http://1tess.wordpress.com
elizaram's picture

(post #32571, reply #29 of 57)

This is to die for.


Cardamom Coffee Cake
The Moosewood Cookbook
1 3/4 hours to prepare and bake; 16 servings


1 lb. butter, softened
2 cups (packed) light brown sugar
4 eggs
2 tsp. vanilla extract
4 cups flour
2 tsp. baking powder
2 1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
1 Tbsp. powdered cardamom
2 cups sour cream, yogurt, or buttermilk


Nut mixture:
1/4 cup (packed) light brown sugar
1 Tbsp. cinnamon
1/2 cup finely chopped walnuts


Preheat oven to 350F. Butter or oil a 10-inch tube or bundt pan.


In a large bowl, beat butter with sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each. Stir in the vanilla.


Sift together the dry ingredients (not including the nut mixture ingredients) in a separate bowl.


Add the flour mixture, 1/3 of it at a time, to the butter mixture, alternating with the sour cream (or yogurt or buttermilk). Stir just enough to blend after each addition. Don't beat or otherwise overmix.


Combine the nut mixture ingredients in a separate small bowl.


Spoon approximately 1/3 of the batter into the prepared pan. Sprinkle with half the nut mixture, then add another third of the batter. Cover with remaining nut mixture, then top with remaining batter. Lightly spread into place.


Bake approximately 1 1/4 hours or until a knife inserted all the way in comes out clean. Allow to cool in the pan for 20 minutes, then invert onto a plate. Cool at least 30 minutes more before wildly devouring.




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When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

Jean's picture

(post #32571, reply #30 of 57)

Sounds delish.  I have that book, thanks for reminding me of the good stuff in it.



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pamilyn's picture

(post #32571, reply #33 of 57)

zucanoes are really good too.

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Regality's picture

(post #32571, reply #31 of 57)

"This is to die for.


Cardamom Coffee Cake"


I ended up making a similar recipe that I found on Epicurious, but made it as individual shortcake-y biscuit-y things and used them as a base for vanilla ice cream and raspberries.  It was strange the way the smell morphed as I mixed the ingredients.  The nasty odor disappeared and became very enticing.  The taste in the finished product was very nice....except.....I noticed that when I was finished eating it, there was a strange aftertaste in my mouth--exactly like the original smell! 


I remember the first time I ever bought cardamom.  It was ground much finer than the Penzey's or the grocery store product and it was whiter--not the rather sandy colored/textured of the product now available.


Just don't know what to think...and neither does my brain, it seems.


 




 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


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pamilyn's picture

(post #32571, reply #32 of 57)

Elizabeth. Did you see that Mollie Katzen is the guest chef at the Food For Thought Festival this year? Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

elizaram's picture

(post #32571, reply #34 of 57)

Did you see that Mollie Katzen is the guest chef at the Food For Thought Festival this year?


COOL!! Moosewood was one of my first cookbooks, and though I don't use it as much as I used to, many of those recipes were mainstays in our diet during the penniless-grad-student-newlyweds era... so I always think of her with fondness. :-)




Money can't buy happiness, but it can make you awfully comfortable while you're being miserable. — Clare Boothe Luce



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

pamilyn's picture

(post #32571, reply #35 of 57)

I used to cook at a coop and it was my mainstay cookbook. I still love the Brazilian Blackbean soup recipe. Most of the recipes are a little high in fat for me now. Have you made the zucanoes? Yummmm

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Glenys's picture

(post #32571, reply #36 of 57)

I made this cake on the weekend because I had freshly ground some cardamom but did a bit too much. Had over the tablespoon, but thought the cake could take it, and I think it could have used more. Baked it the night before so the flavour could develop.

My thought on a cake this large and dense is that it loses a bit in the baking. To complete the baking of that cake in a 10" tube pan, I think it actually dries it a bit. I'd halve the recipe and make a 6" bundt or tube pan.

What does everyone think? I used the 1 lb of butter and full fat sour cream, extra large eggs. Still seemed a tad on the dry side to me.

elizaram's picture

(post #32571, reply #37 of 57)

Hmm, I haven't made this cake in years, but I don't remember it being dry. It could stand to be more moist though. It would probably help to bake in a smaller pan - as I recall it took a very long time to cook through to the middle, and by that time the outside was probably overcooked. I should try it that way sometime. (Even cutting the recipe down and baking it in the same size pan might work. As written, it makes a very tall cake.)



Money can't buy happiness, but it can make you awfully comfortable while you're being miserable. — Clare Boothe Luce



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

assibams's picture

(post #32571, reply #18 of 57)

I posted a recipe for Kanelbullar (Swedish yeasted sweet rolls with cardamom and cinnamon) that must be still floating around here.


Okay, found them: 15412.11


Easy to make, freeze beautifully (baked).



Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

jerseygirl's picture

(post #32571, reply #47 of 57)

Just got to reading this thread....I had a Swedish MIL who made a wonderful coffee bread with cardamom...most recently I made MeanChefs pecan, cardamom sandies which were delightful...it really is a lovely spice.

schnitzel's picture

(post #32571, reply #48 of 57)

I had a Swedish MIL who made a wonderful coffee bread with cardamom...


Ooo, was it a braid? My Swedish grandmother would make a few braids every week and if you showed up at her house on Saturday for coffee, she'd give you one to take home. And it's the first bread I learned to make. <sniff>


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jerseygirl's picture

(post #32571, reply #49 of 57)

Exactly....how I wish I had a piece of it right now!!!!

Adele's picture

(post #32571, reply #50 of 57)

Hey jerseygirl, how are you doing?  Moving around okay?

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

jerseygirl's picture

(post #32571, reply #53 of 57)

Thanks for asking, Adele...I still have my leg in a "boot" but it comes off this Friday.  I really didn't expect an Achilles tendon to take so long to heal.  Doc says another three months before I can get back on the tennis court or golf course...so it's cooking until then to occupy my time......but it will be worth it in the end. 


 


Happy Father's Day to all you Dad's out there!!!!