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Canadian Equivalent to Skirt Steak?

Peggy56's picture

1337.1 

Hi everyone - I've been reading all these yummy-sounding recipes for fajitas that call for "Skirt Steak".  I think that might be an American term because I cannot find skirt steak anywhere and my butcher has no idea what it is.  He said that he thought Flank Steak was probably the same thing but I have since been told that it is similar but not exactly the same.  Can anyone translate for me?  Thanks.

Gary's picture

(post #36333, reply #1 of 33)

Skirt steak is the diaphragm muscle. In the United States, whole skirt steak has the meat-cutting classification NAMP 121. The more tender inner skirt (NAMP 121D) is attached to the rib cage (ribs 6-12),

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

Peggy56's picture

(post #36333, reply #2 of 33)

thanks Gary - is that like professional international butcher talk? 

Gary's picture

(post #36333, reply #3 of 33)

Between the 2 pieces on information, your butcher should be able to give you what you need. Bon appetite.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

Peggy56's picture

(post #36333, reply #4 of 33)

I hope so - thanks for your help.

Gretchen's picture

(post #36333, reply #5 of 33)

Gary has given you good info. Skirt steak isn't all that common in many parts of thecountry, but it is OH so good when you can find it.  It is quite tender, very fat, needs to be cut on the bias for tenderness and VERY flavorful.  YOu might google for it and take it to your butcher.


In Texas it is EVERYwhere (because of fajitas) and less expensive, when last I looked.


You can use other cuts for some uses. Flank or even "London broil".


Gretchen
Gretchen
debe5t's picture

(post #36333, reply #17 of 33)

Okay,another Canadian here...what cut is the london broil?


The last few times I have visited my Aunt in Maine I picked up a couple of london broil steaks on sale for less than $2lb.We cooked them rare on the grill and served sliced,angled a bit.They were so good and tender but I suspect if not cooked and cut right they would be very chewy.


DEb 

Glenys's picture

(post #36333, reply #18 of 33)

Top round, at least that's what a lot of butchers traditonally used.  London Broil is the method, not the cut.  I have to admit I've never purchased that cut or cooked it that way; bit of an old fashioned thing.


Edited 8/28/2008 1:43 am by Glenys

debe5t's picture

(post #36333, reply #21 of 33)

It was my old fashioned thing that first prompted me to buy it.Beef.....less than $2 lb plus it was nice and thick.


I realized broil was the method but not where it was located.


My DH's mother ( a good UK girl) always cooked rump roast for the family.You very seldom see that cut here (N.B.). anymore but according to a butcher I asked once it is near or is the round.


I was suprized at the flavour of the london broil cuts as they seemed to have very little fat.My stance had previously been beef needs fat now I have stretched a bit.;-)

Marcia's picture

(post #36333, reply #25 of 33)

My mother often made a rump roast for Sunday dinner and it was good. If you can't find that, Gretchen's suggestion of a sirloin tip is a good one. With both, I do what Mother did, and stud the meat all over with slivers of garlic and then salt and pepper it. Don't cook beyond rare or you'll have a tough piece of meat.

Gretchen's picture

(post #36333, reply #19 of 33)

What Glenys said about the cut--some part of the round.  We have them often when on sale. Marinate a bit in a teriyaki style sauce for surface flavor.  And you're right about not overcooking and the sliciing.

Gretchen

Gretchen
debe5t's picture

(post #36333, reply #22 of 33)

I will try marinating next time for a change but the flavour was great.


Deb

Gretchen's picture

(post #36333, reply #24 of 33)

I always marinate or do a rub on  it. It is good flavor meat, but not on the order of a good steak, which I don't  marinate.


It is lean, but not like eye round or rump to me.  If you like this you will like a sirloin tip (which is probably really also a part of the round). It makes a nice "roast" in the oven, being careful still to keep it rare, and find the grain of the meat for carving thin.


Gretchen
Gretchen
debe5t's picture

(post #36333, reply #26 of 33)

Thanks for the 'tip' about sirloin tip roast.:-)


Deb

Gary's picture

(post #36333, reply #20 of 33)

LONDON BROIL
Originally a recipe for broiled beef flank
steak carved in thin slices, the name
London Broil now applies to a variety
of usually boneless cuts that can be
broiled, such as top round steak and
chuck shoulder steak.

http://www.beefretail.com/uDocs/BTC/NCBA%20BTC%20S9%20T16.149-154.pdf

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

debe5t's picture

(post #36333, reply #23 of 33)

Thanks Gary.


Years ago we used to raise our own beef and the resemblance between ours and store bought was about the same as garden tomatoes/supermarket tomatoes,instant/fresh ground coffee etc........you know what I mean.


Deb

GroundRound's picture

London Broil (post #36333, reply #33 of 33)

Here in Canada, Ontario, flank steak has been the traditional cut to use for London Broil. Of course I am talking old time butcher cuts. I'm sure as with many older traditional cuts it has been changed due to modern meat cutting methoods and persons not really knowing what cut to use.

 

Example "Well it this meat rolled in some other meat and then cut into round medalion things about so thick" .

 

I have heard that one many a time. And thats how TRDITIONAL cuts disapear. I used to be a butcher before retirement.

Glenys's picture

(post #36333, reply #6 of 33)

Peggy, being a Canadian, I share your frustration.  Getting skirt steak is really going to depend on where you buy your meat.  Supermarkets, no it's flank.  Some butchers, yes if they are still getting carcasses and doing the primary cuts themselves.  Bottom line, use flank. 

Peggy56's picture

(post #36333, reply #7 of 33)

Thanks my fellow Canuck!  I have used flank and it's ok but I'm just anxious to see if there is much of a difference so I will talk to my butcher.  Well, he's not really "my" butcher but you know what I mean.

Glenys's picture

(post #36333, reply #8 of 33)

I always say it's good to have a good relationship with your butcher, although intimate is entirely up to you. 

Peggy56's picture

(post #36333, reply #9 of 33)

Haha!  Now that really would be "Friends with Benefits"!

bjb0777's picture

(post #36333, reply #10 of 33)

Yu can find skirt steak in Toronto at Whole foods. Be prepared to pay!1. It is much thinner than flank, more fat..but very tasty. Barb

Gretchen's picture

(post #36333, reply #11 of 33)

Thinner, yes, but much more tender (relatively) and flavorful.

Gretchen

Gretchen
bjb0777's picture

(post #36333, reply #12 of 33)

Absolutely!

samchang's picture

(post #36333, reply #13 of 33)

And all this time I thought the Canadian equivalent was 'skirt stehk.'

Learn something new every day!

Glenys's picture

(post #36333, reply #14 of 33)

Eewww, you are a linguist, and so early in the morning.

madnoodle's picture

(post #36333, reply #15 of 33)

Huh? I speak Canadian, and I don't get this.  I say steak to rhyme with bake.

I believe in compost.


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

FitnessNut's picture

(post #36333, reply #16 of 33)

I'm with you. ;-)

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell
vjom's picture

(post #36333, reply #27 of 33)

A skirt steak is also a "hanger" steak and very very hard to find as the butchers in Canada prefer to keep it for themselves. It is indeed the diaphragm of the beast, well marbled with fat and yummy.

Gretchen's picture

(post #36333, reply #28 of 33)

I think there is a subtle difference between the two pieces. I think the hanger steak is less tender, less well marbled than the skirt.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Gary's picture

(post #36333, reply #29 of 33)

The diaphragm is one muscle, but it is commonly cut into two separate cuts of meat: the "hanger steak" traditionally considered more flavorful, and the outer skirt steak which is composed of tougher muscle within the diaphragm.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanger_steak


Edited 8/30/2008 12:56 pm ET by Gary

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.