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Can you brine a Butterball turkey ??

oli's picture

Has anyone had poor results brining Butterball turkeys?  I know I should use fresh - but we already bought a frozen turkey and I thought it would be okay to brine.  


Thanks.


 

Jean's picture

(post #28470, reply #1 of 19)

From the Butterball site

  • The breast meat of frozen Butterball Turkeys has been deep basted for juiciness and additional flavor.

  • Read Already Brined or Injected. Don't do it.




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    A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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    Cissy's picture

    (post #28470, reply #2 of 19)

    Has anyone had poor results brining Butterball turkeys?  I know I should use fresh - but we already bought a frozen turkey and I thought it would be okay to brine.  


    You probably shouldn't go there.  Brining works well with a never-frozen turkey.  Butterball turkeys are yik.  Who knows what's been pumped into them.  Sounds like the brining thing will happen next time around for you.

    Gretchen's picture

    (post #28470, reply #3 of 19)

    I don't think it needs to be a never frozen turkey.  And Butterballs have basically already been brined.

    Gretchen

    Gretchen
    ashleyd's picture

    (post #28470, reply #4 of 19)

    It CAN be a frozen turkey but it has to be very slowly thawed in the refrigerator (24 hours/5 # weight) and then brined for 24 hours, then refrigerated uncovered for a further day. Apparently if you rush the process you get mushy turkey. If you can be bothered to do all that you'd be better off getting a fresh one.

    "Appreciation is a wonderful thing; it makes what is excellent in others belong to us as well."
    Voltaire

    Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

    TEChh's picture

    (post #28470, reply #5 of 19)

    Actually, I've had great success brining a turkey that has been thawed quickly using the cold water method.

    ashleyd's picture

    (post #28470, reply #6 of 19)

    Well there you go, we all defy conventional wisdom from time to time, occasionally with great success!

    "Appreciation is a wonderful thing; it makes what is excellent in others belong to us as well."
    Voltaire

    Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

    JoeB2's picture

    (post #28470, reply #7 of 19)

    Actually Alton Brown has a how-to article in November's Bon Appetit for brining frozen turkeys. He gave a quick-thaw method that takes about 12 hours and a slow thaw that takes about 5 days.


    He also said something that surprised me, claiming frozen turkeys are better since they will take less abuse and bruising getting to market.

    Marcia's picture

    (post #28470, reply #8 of 19)

    I heard a chef - I think Charley Palmer, but am not sure - say to be sure to allow at least 24 hours in the fridge to defrost a frozen turkey. Bet that man has never been near a frozen turkey, but the poor people who bought one and listened to him will be in trouble.

    Gretchen's picture

    (post #28470, reply #11 of 19)

    say to be sure to allow at least 24 hours in the fridge to defrost a frozen turkey. Bet that man has never been near a frozen turkey, but the poor people who bought one and listened to him will be in trouble.


    AMEN to that.  Even in my extra fridge I was (unhappily) surprised one year.


    Gretchen
    Gretchen
    Jean's picture

    (post #28470, reply #12 of 19)

    I took mine out tonight. Just breasts but I want to brine them. They should be just right.



    There are two ways to be rich, make more or desire less.

    A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
    http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
    help to provide free mammograms for women in need
    ellengst's picture

    (post #28470, reply #9 of 19)

    Well, I buy my turkey (actually DH gets the turkey, courtesy of a gift certificate from his employer) direct from the turkey farm, so we don't have to worry about the bruising!

    Ellen

    Ellen
    JoeB2's picture

    (post #28470, reply #14 of 19)

    Ironically, there is a full flock (about 25) turkeys that have made it a habit of walking through our backyard just about every morning. The stroll boldly, right through my archery target.


    I'm sooooo tempted. (unfortunately none of them have the required beard length)


     


     

    assibams's picture

    (post #28470, reply #15 of 19)

    (unfortunately none of them have the required beard length)


    That's exactly why they stroll boldly.

    "A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
    Herm Albright

    ellengst's picture

    (post #28470, reply #17 of 19)

    Are these the turkeys we're used to eating, or wild turkeys?

    Ellen

    Ellen
    JoeB2's picture

    (post #28470, reply #18 of 19)

    Are these the turkeys we're used to eating, or wild turkeys?


    They're wild. I've not tasted wild turkey myself but I've heard it is very good (but different than a butterball). It's funny, right after I wrote that I looked out the window and they were in my driveway. Checked again but no beards.... perhaps I should doublecheck the hunting season for hens....


    was it spring where it had to have a beard or fall.....

    Wolvie's picture

    (post #28470, reply #19 of 19)

    come on down here - I have a flock of about 40, fully half of which are ready for table. ;-)

    "So beautifully arranged on the plate - you know someone's fingers have been all over it."
    Julia Child

     

    Gretchen's picture

    (post #28470, reply #10 of 19)

    I don't brine.   That is a period.   I was only saying you CAN brine something else than a "fresh" bird.

    Gretchen

    Gretchen
    anneelsberry's picture

    (post #28470, reply #13 of 19)

    Roasted a Butterball last night (ugh, but it was the only really small turkey I could find) -- really, really salty. So I'd say keep away from the brine.

    Somebody put a stop payment on my reality check!

    Somebody put a stop payment on my reality check!

    Ballottine's picture

    (post #28470, reply #16 of 19)

    Oli,

    I would never presume to tell anyone what to cook or not to cook, but I am begging you not to use Butterball Turkeys.

    Since I am always on the lookout for bones for stock I debone everything. (My youngest did not know that chickens had bones except in the drumsticks and wings till she learned it in the third grade at school.)

    Once a friend of mine, who swore by the Butterball Tukeys asked me to debone one. I did and I'll never touch another Butterball Turkey. Inside was a great amount of something yellow that looked like liquid Olio margarine. I was literally squizing the yellow goo out. My friend ended up buying another turkey. Maybe now days, they use something else, but I still won't touch it.

    As to brining frozen birds, I do it all the time. Defrost slowly, brine for 12 to 15 hours, not more. Bal


    So much to cook; so little time.

     

    So much to cook; so little time.