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GShock's picture

brewing tea (post #37593)

How do you brew tea?

How is it that Suntea without nearto/boiling water makes decent (not necessarily great) tea?

Would tea "make" if you made it like suntea, but did not put it out in the sun? Is it just the water absorbing into the tea leaves?

Gretchen's picture

(post #37593, reply #1 of 47)

Sun tea in our part of the country becomes very musty soon.


I think tea --for iced  tea--can be made many different ways, but the bottom line is FRESH.


Make it as often as you need it. In the morning.  Make another in the afternoon if you drink that much tea. The "SECRET" is FRESH.  It will never be better than whe it is fresh made.


Make it with hot water out of the tap and drink it.  Oh yeah, make it strong.


Gretchen


Edited 6/23/2009 8:42 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
soupereasy's picture

(post #37593, reply #5 of 47)

Never use hot tap water! Have you ever looked at the inside of your hot water tank?

sally ryan's picture

(post #37593, reply #6 of 47)

Exactly what I was thinking, just recently having had all the lime and calcium removed from my hot water heater!

Gretchen's picture

(post #37593, reply #8 of 47)

Is it poisonous?  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #37593, reply #11 of 47)

You're afraid of a little lime and calcium?


Sometimes I wonder--why is that Frisbee getting bigger?--and then it hits me.



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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ashleyd's picture

(post #37593, reply #12 of 47)

Only if they're in lumps!


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37593, reply #13 of 47)

Exactly!!  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #37593, reply #14 of 47)

It also collects in the bottom of your teakettle. :)


Sometimes I wonder--why is that Frisbee getting bigger?--and then it hits me.



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
soupereasy's picture

(post #37593, reply #21 of 47)

Actually I am more afraid of the sludge and rust.


I prefer my lime to come with green skins and, these days, my calcium to come in the form of a pill! ;)

Fledge's picture

(post #37593, reply #47 of 47)

I agree!  Never use hot tap.  When water districts tap in a new line, all kinds of crap get in there and settles at the bottom of the tank.

You don't scare me


I have an African Grey

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

Syb's picture

(post #37593, reply #15 of 47)

 

Never use hot tap water!


That's the rule at our house.  We never use hot tap water for cooking. 


When making tea, it is my understanding that you want to start with fresh, cold water...not even the leftover water in the tea kettle.  I don't know where that came from, but that's what I've always done. 

Canuck's picture

(post #37593, reply #16 of 47)

<start with fresh, cold water>


I think that instruction comes from all English grannies and mums. Plus, warm the teapot before filling it. :)

Syb's picture

(post #37593, reply #17 of 47)

By all means, warm the teapot.


I don't have an English granny or mum, but I must have listened to one at some point.

Jean's picture

(post #37593, reply #18 of 47)

I think the idea is to have your water aerated well. That's why you don't want to use what has been sitting in the kettle. Fresh from the tap is best I've heard.


Sometimes I wonder--why is that Frisbee getting bigger?--and then it hits me.



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Gretchen's picture

(post #37593, reply #20 of 47)

Hot tea and iced tea --might not need as stringent rules.  But I don't get any complaints about my iced tea, and do get some compliments.

Gretchen

Gretchen
soupereasy's picture

(post #37593, reply #22 of 47)

Those are our house rules as well.:)

Heather's picture

(post #37593, reply #2 of 47)

>>Would tea "make" if you made it like suntea, but did not put it out in the sun? Is it just the water absorbing into the tea leaves?<<

No!

ashleyd's picture

(post #37593, reply #4 of 47)

Your reaction seems to show that there is still some hope for tea in the US! Good tea is made with boiling water, other ways of brewing it may give a palatable drink (at least to some) but it's not good tea.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Lee's picture

(post #37593, reply #23 of 47)

There is a shop near me that sells fine teas from all over the world.  They tell me that Americans are becoming more appreciative of fine teas and better informed.  That must be true, given the price per pound of some of their teas and the fact that the shop has been there for several years now.  They hand out catalogues that list all of their teas and the characteristics of each along with information on how they are grown, harvested, dried, aged, etc.  It's fascinating, very much like learning about wines.


One thing I've learned from them is that not all teas should be brewed with boiling water.  They list the proper water temperature and suggested brewing time on each packet.  Several of the Japanese green teas we buy are best when made with water that has been brought to the boil and allowed to cool to 194F before pouring over the tea leaves.  I've ignored that and found that there really is a difference in flavor. 

Heather's picture

(post #37593, reply #24 of 47)

Yes, green teas should be treated gently.


Edited 6/27/2009 2:47 am by Heather

Gretchen's picture

(post #37593, reply #25 of 47)

DH has a lovely tea he uses each morning, and to quell the cries, he does boil the water.  ;o)  Your comment about cost of them prompted this--we now order it by the pound since it is almost impossible to even find. DD gave it to him originally.

Gretchen

Gretchen
sally ryan's picture

(post #37593, reply #26 of 47)

There's a tea shop where I live too, very small town, and I always wonder how much tea you need to sell to cover the overhead.  That reminds me to get down there and shop locally.


 

Gretchen's picture

(post #37593, reply #27 of 47)

The tea shops really can be lovely--I think often small, calm, well appointed--perhaps as we see a real tea drinker to be!!  We have one here called Tea Rex.

Gretchen

Gretchen
sally ryan's picture

(post #37593, reply #28 of 47)

That's cute!

kathymcmo's picture

(post #37593, reply #29 of 47)

I guess it took us a few centuries to get past the memories of the Boston Tea Party.


I've been a tea drinker/noncoffee drinker my entire life and for decades now I've heard that tea is about to catch on in the US. So far no Teabucks on every corner ;-)

Syrah's picture

(post #37593, reply #30 of 47)

Quick! Copyright the name and get the domain registered.

You guys don't have T2? https://www.t2tea.com.au

I thought it was a UK chain, but apparently it is Australian grown.

The Tea Centre is another good chain, http://www.theteacentre.com.au
but I find their staff very snooty.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained."
-Marie Curie
My perseverance will be rewarded.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Heather's picture

(post #37593, reply #31 of 47)

That T2 website gives me a headache--all that flipping and jumping. ;-)

We actually have quite a few tea shops around here, nothing like Starbucks of course--but that's not a bad thing. I have no problem getting good leaf teas and there are a few places that make a good cup.

That being said, the common cup of tea in the US is either a bag with (not in) a cup of water or a small pot of tepid water with the tea bag on the side again. Sad. It's much easier to make a decent cup of tea than a good cup of coffee, I can't see why so few places seem to try.

Syrah's picture

(post #37593, reply #32 of 47)

Me too, but the teas are nice. I think I'll try the Sydney blend next time I'm near one.

We're afflicted with the same issue. I now ask if the tea is leaf or bag tea before ordering anywhere. Odds are if they are mindful enough to have the leaves, the tea will be good. I skip bags.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained."
-Marie Curie
My perseverance will be rewarded.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Heather's picture

(post #37593, reply #33 of 47)

A good pot of tea is the best reason to visit Victoria or London. I'm sorry to hear that Australia isn't maintaining tea standards.

roz's picture

(post #37593, reply #34 of 47)

<<<A good pot of tea is the best reason to visit Victoria or London>>>

...or my house in Kilshanny! I'll give you a good cuppa Darjeeling or Sikkam or if you prefer Japanese green tea...direct from Japan. No bag tea here unless you are Irish and expect 'stewed' tea!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz