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Bernaise.... what can go wrong?

SallyBR1's picture

Getting ready for tomorrow, I would like to ask what should I be careful about when making Bernaise. It' s been a long time since I made it, it turned out pretty good, but I don t want to mess up tomorrow

I am having trouble finding fresh tarragon - don t kill me, but would it be ok to use Penzey's French tarragon, dried?

Or is it better to choose another sauce for our steaks?

About making the Bernaise a little in advance and holding it in a thermos - would it separate????

Thanks for your help

BTW, Jean, thanks for that galette link - I will probably use that recipe, will make a double batch

 


 


"The beauty of a Sally is how neatly she can be divided"
(CookiMonster, Dec 2005)

Jean's picture

(post #32507, reply #1 of 11)

You're welcome.  Glad to help -- seeing that Schnitzel seems to be AWOL.




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ashleyd's picture

(post #32507, reply #2 of 11)

Purists might disagree but I have used decent dried (and reasonably new) tarragon for this and it gives an acceptable result. The key to making this, as for Hollandaise, is not to boil it or it will "break". I'm not sure about holding it for all sorts of reasons, probably the best way is to make the sauce in advance, cool it as rapidly as possible and then gently reheat in a double boiler when you need it. If disaster strikes then don't panic, add a little cold water (or an ice cube) and whisk until re-emulsified (a quick burst with a stick blender works too).


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #32507, reply #4 of 11)

Ok, great

now, another quick question

Should I serve the steaks WITH some sauce already poured over and extra sauce in a serving dish, or serve the steaks naked and pass the sauce around?

edited to add - I intend to serve dinner fully dressed. Naked applies exclusively to the steaks.

"The beauty of a Sally is how neatly she can be divided"
(CookiMonster, Dec 2005)


Edited 5/5/2006 10:54 am by SallyBR1

Gary's picture

(post #32507, reply #5 of 11)

Pass around. Everyone has a different idea of how much sauce they like. Or you can meet them halfway. Drizzle just a little sauce on the steaks and have additional available for those who want more. If you are naked when the steaks are served, no one will care how much sauce is on the steaks. :)

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

ashleyd's picture

(post #32507, reply #6 of 11)

I'm with that, little drizzle on one side and pass the rest.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Marcia's picture

(post #32507, reply #3 of 11)

You can use the dried tarragon, Sally. When I first made Bearnaise, you could hardly find fresh and I used Julia's recipe from Mastering which calls for dried. As long as it's the French sort, it'll be fine and all of Penzey's herbs are ultra fresh (for dried, I mean).


The thermos should hold it well as long as it's a good thermos. I prefer the ones with the stainless interiors.

Glenys's picture

(post #32507, reply #7 of 11)

The spelling- Béarnaise.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #32507, reply #8 of 11)

Thank you

I don t know how to get the accent going, though -my keyboard is accent=challenged, which drives my friends and family crazy when I write in Portuguese

 


 


"The beauty of a Sally is how neatly she can be divided"
(CookiMonster, Dec 2005)

ashleyd's picture

(post #32507, reply #9 of 11)

My keyboard is accent challenged too, but fortunately Microsoft Word isn't so whenever I want an accent I open MS Word and use Insert Symbol and then cut and paste here. The other way is to look up the word on Google and then copy and paste, in most instances it will also "correct" your spelling..."did you mean ..........". Unfortunately if you enter Bernaise you find that approximately 108000 pages have it spelled wrongly althought 438000 managed to get it right, but the first does not suggest the second.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #32507, reply #10 of 11)

So, the correct answer to my question would be

THe very first thing that can (and will) go wrong with Bearnaise is its spelling!

:-)

 


 


"The beauty of a Sally is how neatly she can be divided"
(CookiMonster, Dec 2005)

elizaram's picture

(post #32507, reply #11 of 11)

If your keyboard has a num pad, it's easy to add accented characters. Each of them has an ASCII code associated with it. See this link:


http://www.lookuptables.com/


Scroll down to the bottom where it says "Extended ASCII Codes" and you will see all the non-US-keyboard characters. Each of them has a code number associated with them. Hold down the ALT key on your keyboard, type the code on the num pad, then let go of the ALT key, and the special character will appear in your typing.


For instance, to get the accented e, whose code is 130:


(hold down ALT key) (type "130" on num pad) (release ALT key)


Try it! (I don't have a num pad on this computer, so I can't demonstrate, LOL)




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Edited 5/6/2006 10:16 am by elizaram



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