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Beef Cuts for Rotisserie

deejeh's picture

SO and I have recently become the proud owners of a Napoleon barbeque, with rotisserie.  So far, I've not had great success finding rotisseries recipes/info, particularly about beef roasts.  We've done chicken and pork loin, which were both outstanding, but last night, we did an inside round roast, weighing in at just over 1 kilo.  I marinated it overnight in a red chimichurri (recipe from Epicurious) and then put it on the spit (basting with boiled-down marinade) til it measured 140°, let it rest for 15 min, then carved and served it.  The results were less than stellar.  The meat was juicy, but very chewy, and the marinade had not done much for the flavour.


Is it that beef just isn't a good candidate for spit-roasting? Or, (as I suspect) did I choose completely the wrong cut?  Opinions/advice, please.


deej

MadMom's picture

(post #29563, reply #1 of 16)

I would think that a round roast would be a less than stellar candidate for spit roasting.  My personal favorites are rib eye or tenderloin.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

deejeh's picture

(post #29563, reply #2 of 16)

Is it because they are less lean than eye of round?  We don't eat a whole lot of beef in our house unless it's steak, so I'm somewhat clueless when it comes to a roast.


deej

Gretchen's picture

(post #29563, reply #3 of 16)

You need a boned ribeye roast for an absolutely spectacular roast. ALSO, cook to 125* and let rest. 140* is too well done--especially for a piece of round.
You need MORE fat, not less (round has no fat). That is what ribeye and tenderloin will give.  The tenderloin may be too "skinny" to adequately rotiss--you can actually just grill  that, turning often.


The round is too tough, too lean, too tasteless to do anything with except pot roast with a lot of vegetables to give it some taste.


Gretchen


Edited 8/3/2004 11:47 am ET by GRETCHEN

Gretchen
deejeh's picture

(post #29563, reply #4 of 16)

Thanks, Gretchen.  I'll look for a boned ribeye.  And as far as last night's roast is concerned, well, I have a pair of sandals that need resoling :)


deej

dixie1's picture

(post #29563, reply #6 of 16)

Other than for ease of slicing, why would you want it boneless?

Gretchen's picture

(post #29563, reply #7 of 16)

I suspect to go on the rotisserie. It needs to be a uniform cylinder or it won't turn.

Gretchen

Gretchen
deejeh's picture

(post #29563, reply #9 of 16)

what Gretchen said...I haven't figured out the whole counterweight thing too well, so the closer I can get to the centre with the spit, the better it is.


deej

Gretchen's picture

(post #29563, reply #10 of 16)

It really needs to be cylindrical.  If you cut your round roast on the bias it will be more tender.

Gretchen

Gretchen
dixie1's picture

(post #29563, reply #5 of 16)

did I choose completely the wrong cut


I think that was your problem - round, top round, bottom round, eye of round, all those have no taste to me unless braised, but they all look so good in the supermarket.


I bought some top round yesterday for chicken fried steak (yes, definitely on our low chol diet). I pounded and pounded and pounded some more until it was very thin, then tried to chicken fry. We could have eaten a pair of our shoes for all the taste and tenderness. I will grind the rest of it to mix with chuck for burgers. It was nasty.

deejeh's picture

(post #29563, reply #8 of 16)

I'm with you on that...although, we had it cold for sandwiches tonight, and it was actually more tender than when it was hot. Go figure... 


That said, though, I'll be passing on this cut of meat.  If I want something for sandwiches, I'll smoke a brisket.


deej

Wolvie's picture

(post #29563, reply #11 of 16)

prime rib on the roti is fab.

"We fed the heart on fantasy...the heart grew brutal on the fare" WB Yeats

 

deejeh's picture

(post #29563, reply #12 of 16)

prime rib on the roti is fab.


Thanks for the tip, Wolvie...is it a big deal to get it centred on the spit so that it turns correctly?  I still haven't figured out the counterweight thing...


deej

Wolvie's picture

(post #29563, reply #13 of 16)

no big deal at all. the counterweight on mine goes on the skewer between the wooden handle and the slot made for the skewer /roti - if that makes any sense. I have a charcoal grill, and set the coals to the sides, (to have indirect heat) with a drip pan in the middle.

"We fed the heart on fantasy...the heart grew brutal on the fare" WB Yeats

 

deejeh's picture

(post #29563, reply #14 of 16)

Wolvie, you may just have solved our counterweight challenge - the directions for the rotisserie were sketchy, to say the least, and didn't include anything about how to use the counterweight.  SO, who truly believes he is the barbeque king, was putting the counterweight close to the centre of the spit, then cursing a blue streak when he couldn't get the thing to turn without hiccuping.  I do believe if he puts it closer to the handle, it'll work.  Thanks.


deej

Wolvie's picture

(post #29563, reply #15 of 16)

ummm - where was he putting the meat/poultry? ;-)


That's what I put at the center.


"We fed the heart on fantasy...the heart grew brutal on the fare" WB Yeats

 

deejeh's picture

(post #29563, reply #16 of 16)

ummm - where was he putting the meat/poultry? ;-)


That's what I put at the center.


That's what he puts at the centre as well, but then he has been putting the counterweight right next to the meat.  We'll try something on the spit this weekend and position the counterweight correctly.  If that spit turns without hitches and hiccups, he'll be a happy guy...


deej