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Asian finger food ideas

Aberwacky's picture

We're having the judo students over Saturday for a food and lake fest, and they've requested sushi, which, with the budget being what it is means California and veggie rolls.  We've made these before with them and they were a big hit. I'm looking for suggestions for loosely Asian finger foods to go with those.  


Tradition is out the window, so mixing of Asian cuisines is fine.   I'm going to have edamame, but my brain isn't working well enough to come up with other ideas.


These get-togethers are traditionally very hands-on, with everyone chopping and cooking and helping (they get the opportunity to learn some techniques and try new foods), so things we can make together are good.


Also need some ideas for snacky stuff to have on-hand while we're making the rest of the food.  For other feasts, I've had various cheeses, olives, fruit, etc., but I'm looking for something with a more Asian feel. 


There will be 15-20 people.  Hungry college students, I might add.


Any suggestions?


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
deejeh's picture

(post #32408, reply #1 of 37)

I saw Kylie Kwong on the Food Network last night making an updated version of shrimp toasts that she served with a dipping sauce that looked just delicious.  Here's a link to the recipe:


http://www.foodtv.ca/recipes/recipedetails.aspx?dishid=7603


deej

Glenys's picture

(post #32408, reply #2 of 37)

That did look good didn't it? And the lettuce wraps? Yum!

deejeh's picture

(post #32408, reply #3 of 37)

I didn't see the lettuce wraps, unfortunately.  The shrimp toasts looked so good - they'd be a perfect hors d'oeuvre for a summer party.


deej

ehBeth's picture

(post #32408, reply #32 of 37)

I've just caught on to Kylie Kwong. Wow. I'm definitely going to be looking for her books.

If you can't play a sport, be one.
If you can't play a sport, be one.
Glenys's picture

(post #32408, reply #33 of 37)

She's amazing. Have you been watching the new series, doing a sort of "roots" thing. Not Roots clothing of course, no jokes you Canadians.

ehBeth's picture

(post #32408, reply #35 of 37)

Last night I watched the episode called Hong Kong's Chef Academy.


Fantastic!



 

hoping the links are live - if not

 




If you can't play a sport, be one.

If you can't play a sport, be one.
Glenys's picture

(post #32408, reply #36 of 37)

I began watching and got distracted by phone calls; uniforms looked like those clay soldiers from the Chinese tomb army.
Lots of padding for a hot kitchen.

butterfingers's picture

(post #32408, reply #37 of 37)

This is too late to do any good this time around, but here is a spiffy recipe that I learned in an Asian Desserts class at L'Academie De Cuisine (Bethesda, MD) a few years back. It is one of my favorites.

Banana Wrappers

3-4 ripe bananas
1/2 cup dark brown sugar
2 oz. butter
1 tbs. rum
1/2 cup chopped peanuts
wonton wrappers

1. Slice the bananas

2. Melt butter and brown sugar. Add bananas and rum. Sauté for about 5 minutes.

3. Add chopped peanuts. Cool slightly.

4. Put banana mixture in middle of one wonton wrapper. Brush outside edges with egg white. Place second wrapper on top, and seal edges. Repeat using all wonton wrappers.

5. Heat oil in pot (2 inches of oil) to 350 degrees.

6. Fry until light golden on each side.

7. Serve with ice cream or chocolate sauce. (My preference is drizzled with chocolate sauce.

Syrah's picture

(post #32408, reply #34 of 37)

You'll have to let us know how you like it. I really enjoy watching her show.

"The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off"
Gloria Steinem

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Tana's picture

(post #32408, reply #4 of 37)

How about wontons, shumai or potstickers? I think the ingredients would be rather inexpensive and wonton wrappers are probably something your guests haven't worked with before.

Spring rolls or summer rolls might be an unusual option. There was a good recipe in Fine Cooking about a year ago.

Meang Kam(sp?) is a Thai appetizer. A small leaf of lettuce is filled with couple of peanuts, a couple of pinches of finely toasted coconut, a few pieces of dried shrimp, a couple of 1/4" pieces of lime with the skin, onion and fresh ginger. Then a delicious sauce is gingerly drizzled on top. It's perfect for company because guests assemble their own and take what they like. A Thai friend gave me a delicious recipe for the sauce, but when it cooks it is really foul smelling. The good part is that it will last forever in the refrigerator. My grill has a burner and it is perfect place for the sauce to cook.

Edited for clarity


Edited 4/11/2006 12:14 pm ET by Tana

dlish's picture

(post #32408, reply #5 of 37)

You could try the spring rolls from one of the FC issues last year. There was also a pull-out guide that had a bunch of appetizers. There was a smoked salmon roll that works well and is good. Costco has good smoked salmon at a reasonable price.

As well, in the Martha Stewart appetizer handbook, she has a smoked salmon stack. It is layered Nori (the black seaweed sheets), rice, wasabi, smoked salmon.

evelyn's picture

(post #32408, reply #6 of 37)

http://www.recipezaar.com/81010 Pork Gyoza

bits of http://www.recipezaar.com/66049 Tandoori Chicken to serve with Madhur Jaffrey's http://www.recipezaar.com/70119 Sweet Tomato Chutney, maybe in lettuce cups?


Edited 4/11/2006 12:30 pm ET by evelyn

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
samchang's picture

(post #32408, reply #7 of 37)

Shrimp toasts are great, but they are a bit labor intensive, especially for @20 hungry students. Anything fried can be a handful, especially because they tend to get limp if you make them ahead of time. I'd limit the munchies to 2 fried items max.


Lettuce cups are a great idea. And if they're going to roll their own sushi, summer rolls will work nicely, too. But if they expect prepared foods, that could mean some extra labor involved for you as well.


Glazed chicken wings are a pretty good choice, too. Grill them in advance, or bake them and throw them under the broiler for final crisping: either way, they're fine room temp. Satays work as well (keeping in mind to keep them small--real satays from the roadside stands in Indonesia are about a bite's worth anyways)

Aberwacky's picture

(post #32408, reply #8 of 37)

They're rolling their own sushi--summer rolls are a good idea.  Sushi makings I keep on hand, but I can pick up some rice paper easily enough.


Satays would be good, too.  I could have a couple of kids making those over at the grill while others are at the island assembling the sushi and summer rolls.


I do have a warming drawer, and it does a reasonable job of keeping fried foods crisp, but we could also eat them as we go, too.  It's a pretty informal affair, as you can tell. 


Good ideas, everyone! 


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
RheaS's picture

(post #32408, reply #9 of 37)

If you have the grill going, bulgoki would be good. This is thin slices of beef marinated in soy sauce, sesame, lots of garlic and green onions then grilled. You can serve this with rice as a lettuce wrap or skewer and serve like satays. A noodle dish might also work for you. Korean chap chae, or better yet, one of the cold Asian noodle dishes such as Japanese Zaru Soba or a Thai one with a name I can't remember.

Aberwacky's picture

(post #32408, reply #10 of 37)

Ooh, the beef sounds good.  I could do that with venison tenderloin, too, which I have.  The cold noodle salad sounds perfect, and I could do that ahead.  Isn't there one somewhere on CT that folks have really liked?  With a peanut sauce, I think. 


I'll try searching for it.


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Syrah's picture

(post #32408, reply #11 of 37)

I saw a recipe somewhere for Edamame Dumplings.. they looked awesome. I think I saved it, if you would like it.

"The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off"
Gloria Steinem

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Aberwacky's picture

(post #32408, reply #18 of 37)

Those sound good--if they're different from what's posted from Cooking Light, please share.  I think I'll make one of those recipes, if I can find the shelled edamame (unshelled I can get.)


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Adele's picture

(post #32408, reply #22 of 37)

edamame


I had that for the first time last weekend.  I wasn't sure if I could eat the pods or not, so I tried one and decided not.  LOL.  I'm 99% sure they were raw- they were in a package by the sushi in the store.  I liked the taste and will buy them again.  I did drizzle the pods w/sesame oil. 


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

TracyK's picture

(post #32408, reply #24 of 37)

Aren't they great? Like popcorn. They are really pretty much a guilt-free food... delicious, addictive, but totally good for you. I sprinkle the pods with kosher salt... sesame oil would be good too!

Why is it so cold on this beach? And what's taking the bartender so long?

Syrah's picture

(post #32408, reply #26 of 37)

I'll have a look when I get home. They have the shelled in the same place as the unshelled. I think it is labeled "edamame meat"

"The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off"
Gloria Steinem

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

KarenP's picture

(post #32408, reply #27 of 37)

nummmmmmm

 

Edamame Tossed with Smoky Salt

 

6 servings

 

1 ½ tsp Lapsang souchong tea leaves (smoky tea found at specialty tea stores)

1 ½ tsp kosher salt

One 14-oz package frozen unshelled edamame

1 ½ tsp extra-virgin olive oil

 


  1. In a spice grinder or mini processor, grind the Lapsang souchong tea and salt to a fine powder.

 


  1. Heat edamame according to package directions – do not overcook.

 


  1. Drain excess moisture from edamame and transfer to bowl.  Toss with oil and season to taste with flavored salt.  Serve hot.

Syrah's picture

(post #32408, reply #28 of 37)

Okay, it looks to be based on the Cooking Light one. Not sure how different it is, but for your reference

Edamame Dumplings Recipe #163549
From the April 2006 issue of Cooking Light and adapted with the help of RedMeatGirl. We felt that the filling needed a little extra kick. Please adjust the seasonings to suit your own tastes.
2 tablespoons green onions, chopped
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 teaspoon honey
1 cup frozen edamame, shelled
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon dark sesame oil
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon hot pepper flakes
3 garlic cloves, minced
20 wonton wrappers
2 teaspoons cornstarch
cooking spray
1/2 cup water, divided
4 servings Change size or US/metric
Change to: servings US Metric
25 minutes 15 mins prep
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1. To prepare sauce, combine the first 3 ingredients in a small bowl, stirring with a whisk.
2. To prepare dumplings, cook edamame according to package directions; drain. Rinse edamame with cold water; drain well. Combine edamame, juice, sesame oil, cumin, red pepper flakes, garlic, and salt in a food processor, process until smooth.
3. Working with 1 wonton wrapper at a time (cover remaining wrappers with a damp towel to prevent drying), spoon about 1 teaspoon edamame mixture in center of each wrapper. Moisten edges of dough with water; fold opposite corners to form a triangle, pinching points to seal. Place dumplings on a large baking sheet sprinkled with cornstarch.
4. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Arrange half of dumplings in a single layer in pan; reduce heat to medium. Cook 1 minute or until bottoms begin to brown; turn. Add 1/4 cup water to pan; cover. Cook 30 seconds; uncover. Cook 1 minute or until liquid evaporates. Repeat procedure with the remaining dumplings and water. Serve immediately with sauce.

"The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off"
Gloria Steinem

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Ricks503's picture

(post #32408, reply #12 of 37)

Fried won ton with some dipping sauce and/or chinese mustard.


Beggars purse


grilled chicken/beef/pork satays


1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

elizaram's picture

(post #32408, reply #13 of 37)

If you have a big enough steamer, you could do bao. Make up the dough beforehand, have the guys fill them, and they cook up in no time. And they are very inexpensive to make.




Food-forward parents like mine served dinners of homemade falafel, Mediterranean fish stew or stir-fried beef with broccoli. To me, dishes like spaghetti and meatballs, mashed potatoes with gravy and macaroni and cheese seemed exotic and unattainable. --Julia Moskin (NYT)



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

Aberwacky's picture

(post #32408, reply #19 of 37)

That's a good idea, too.  I have a triple-decker bamboo steamer that would work.


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Gretchen's picture

(post #32408, reply #23 of 37)

coming late but shao mei (I know has been mentioned) is easy and good. Aussie's noodle salad is an absolute favorite!
I made some turkey meatballs that are simmered in a green curry sauce that were delicious. Can post if you want.
Saw a different but easy take on summer rolls in Southern Living yesterday. Roll chicken salad in the rice paper.


Gretchen
Gretchen
DeannaS's picture

(post #32408, reply #29 of 37)

You can actually bake them, too. Bake some and steam some and people can see the difference.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

KarenP's picture

(post #32408, reply #30 of 37)

 Late, as usual. I like this simple salad that was a side served in a sushi class.


Green Beans with Sesame Miso Dressing                                       Serves 8


2 cups green beans, trimmed and cut into 1 1/2” pieces


 


Sesame Dressing


2 tablespoons white sesame seeds + more for garnish (buy the already roasted)


2 tablespoons shiro miso (white soybean paste)


1 tablespoon sugar


1 tablespoon soy sauce


2 tablespoons mirin (cooking sake)


 


Preparation: Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil. Parboil the green beans for 45-60 seconds. Drain and immediately plunge into a bowl of ice water.


 


Using a mortar and pestle, grind the sesame seeds first and then blend in the shiro miso, sugar, and soy sauce. Smash and stir until well mixed. Add the mirin and mix well.


 


Drain the green beans and blot dry. Transfer to a bowl and fold in the dressing until the beans are evenly coated.


 


Serve in small bowls and lightly sprinkle with sesame seeds.


 


 


 

Aberwacky's picture

(post #32408, reply #31 of 37)

Thanks everyone--the feast was a huge hit.


Lots of milling around, eating, helping, cooking, and everyone enjoyed it. 


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy