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apricot nectar

Wolvie's picture

So - the pineapple martini recipe I have called for a bit of apricot nectar in each one. Easy, I say (although I have never had any - to my knowledge)- I'll just buy some or some apricot juice. Ah no no - not here in the hinterlands.


Luckily, fresh apricots were plentiful this week (not always the case here) so - using my trusty internet, I decide to look for a recipe. I find that one really doesn't exist - no hard and fast rules anyway. So this is what  I did: I made a simple syrup (very light - one to one ratio) while the water was heating up to add the sugar, I peeled the apricots and spun them in the food processor. When the syrup was done and still very hot, I placed some of the hot syrup in the FP and further pureed the apricots. Then I put the puree back into the rest of the simple syrup ( 4 apricots for 2 cups syrup) and let it steep until cool. Strained it - and - voila - great "nectar".


It was interesting to search for recipes for this stuff. They were all over the place - pure juice, juice diluted with water, just with a heavier ratio syrup, etc. I basically punted. ;-)


The tini's were great - not that you could really screw those up.



Your first job is to prepare the soil. The best tool for this is your neighbor's garden tiller. If your neighbor does not own a garden tiller, suggest that he buy one.


Dave Barry





 

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #30927, reply #1 of 11)

I know this may not help in the hinterlands either but groceries catering to Latinos seem to have all the "nectars".

Gretchen

Gretchen
Risottogirl's picture

(post #30927, reply #2 of 11)

Luckily, fresh apricots were plentiful this week


now there's a phrase I haven't had occasion to utter in a good LONG while


;)



I was 32 when I started cooking; up until then, I just ate
Julia Child


Edited 5/29/2005 9:14 am ET by RISOTTOGIRL

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Wolvie's picture

(post #30927, reply #3 of 11)

I know - this is the first time I've seen decent one since last year.


The tree here at Wolvieland needs a couple of more weeks. The sour cherries are already finished. They were great. :-)



Your first job is to prepare the soil. The best tool for this is your neighbor's garden tiller. If your neighbor does not own a garden tiller, suggest that he buy one.


Dave Barry





 

 

Biscuits's picture

(post #30927, reply #4 of 11)

This is pretty much what I do when I need "mango nectar" for mango martinis.  Even around here, mango nectar isn't easy to find.

Ancora Imparo -

Ancora Imparo -

dlish's picture

(post #30927, reply #5 of 11)

Where are the hinterlands? Does your grocery store not carry Kern's nectars? (Probably not, or you might not have gone through such great lengths) ;^)
Does your area have a Cost Plus? They carry nectars sometimes -- as does WIlliams Sonoma and Trader Joe's.

Kern's comes in cans in the juice aisle usually on the top shelf kind of near the Clamato & regular tomato juice.

Those martinis sound yummy! I love putting apricot nectar in champagne. mmmm

Wolvie's picture

(post #30927, reply #7 of 11)

WV - and nooooope - no Kern's, no cost plus. Believe me, I would have bought some. :-)


We don't have any real hispanic market, either. Just the section called "ethnic" in our local grocery. The extent of THAT we won't comment on.



Your first job is to prepare the soil. The best tool for this is your neighbor's garden tiller. If your neighbor does not own a garden tiller, suggest that he buy one.


Dave Barry





 

 

Marcia's picture

(post #30927, reply #9 of 11)

We have Goya nectars in all of our markets, and we are surely in the hinterlands. There is usually a separate section for the Goya products, for which I suppose the company pays, but they have nectars in various flavors, one of which is mango.

Wolvie's picture

(post #30927, reply #10 of 11)

we have Goya (some) here, just not the nectars. Le sigh.


Your first job is to prepare the soil. The best tool for this is your neighbor's garden tiller. If your neighbor does not own a garden tiller, suggest that he buy one.


Dave Barry





 

 

Marcia's picture

(post #30927, reply #11 of 11)

I guess olives wouldn't make a good substitute. :)

sommersu's picture

(post #30927, reply #6 of 11)

I have to tell you that I'm very impressed that you went to all the trouble that you did for just a hint of the nectar..Bravo for you! After the 2nd drink..who knows whats in it...

Wolvie's picture

(post #30927, reply #8 of 11)

true - but - I wanted to make it the way it said(for once) - I get stubborn sometimes. ;-)


Your first job is to prepare the soil. The best tool for this is your neighbor's garden tiller. If your neighbor does not own a garden tiller, suggest that he buy one.


Dave Barry