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apples for pie

whatscooking's picture

So my apple pie came out only OK this time. I used Dorie Greenspan's recipe from t&t. - which I've used before and think is an overall good recipe  The apples I chose were golden delish, jonagold and cortland.  2 large of each.  The apples in the cooked pie were sort of mushy, but the taste was good.  I didn't want to use granny smith b/c I'm not crazy about how they cook down.  I thought golden delicious were recommended as a good pie apple, now I'm not so sure. 


There doesn't seem to be that many good choices in the midwest.  I couldn't find winesap or  cortland or any of the other recommended pie apples.  What's a girl to do?


The world is divided into two kinds of people: 
those who wake up thinking about what they're going to eat
for supper, and those who don't.


Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Sally Swift
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Risottogirl's picture

(post #36743, reply #1 of 11)

I think Goldens are the best dessert apples, but I have used others. I do think the supermarket Goldens are kind of bland and have seemed mushy this year. The local ones I got this fall were okay though. I think a couple of people here have reported poor results with Goldens recently.


I got 10# of Fortune apples in my CSA - they are supposed to be good storage apples. This is a new variety to me. So far we have just eaten some, I haven't cooked with any.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Jigs-n-fixtures's picture

(post #36743, reply #2 of 11)

The suitability of Golden Delicious as a pie apple is kind of iffy; depending on how fresh they are, and how far they have been shipped.  Cortlands will almost always go mushy. 


Dependable baking apples are:  JonaGolds, Jonathans, Pippins, Winesaps, Gravensteins. 


Usually good are:  Braeburn, Fuji, Mutsu, Pink Lady, Suncrisp, Rome Beauty, and Empire. 


Generally dependable tart apples are:  Idared, Macoun, Newton-Pippin, and Northern Spy. 


Almost always mushy:  McIntosh and Cortland.

whatscooking's picture

(post #36743, reply #4 of 11)

I heard you should seek out the greener golden delish.  Out of all of those "dependable" ones,  I only saw the jonagolds in the market.  Sometimes in early fall, I'll find the others at the farmer's markets.  But the markets close at the end of October in Chgo..  I can find Braeburn and Fuji regularly but I've never tried those in a pie.  Unfortunately, the "generally dependable" ones are no where to be found around here. It is interesting that you didn't mention granny smith at all.  Those are always available.  But I've learned my lesson with them already.  I'll give the others you recommended a try.  I wish I had just made it with all jonagolds.    Thanks for your suggestions. 

The world is divided into two kinds of people: 
those who wake up thinking about what they're going to eat
for supper, and those who don't.


Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Sally Swift
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Madeleine's picture

(post #36743, reply #6 of 11)

OK...so why do the recipes always say Granny Smith??? My pie crust was divine but the apples were not cooked enough...I would have enjoyed mushy as an alternative to these too crisp apples.

Madeleine

Madeleine
chiquiNO's picture

(post #36743, reply #7 of 11)

When I use only Granny Smiths for my pies, I sautee the apples in a little butter and sugar for about 10 minutes to soften then up a bit, then cool and put into a well chilled pie crust (almost always in a glass pie plate for a browned bottom rust.)

 

 

Glenys's picture

(post #36743, reply #8 of 11)

The long and the short of it is, like much of fruit and vegetable availability, Granny Smith have been developed to be a long-storing, tart, hard cooking apple, which is what the grocery industry likes. Most supermarkets sell about half a dozen varieties, with varying regional favourites, and so it's become the available common apple.
At farmers' markets, as I'm lucky enough to enjoy, they have forty varieties of old varieties and the common varieties but grown by smaller producers. Then, picking an apple for every use can be a great endless experiment. Did you use a knife to test the apples while baking?

Madeleine's picture

(post #36743, reply #9 of 11)

I did test with a knife, baked the pie longer, tested again, crust was getting very brown. Tested again after a few minutes more and I must have hit one or two of the tender apples. There were a few tender apples. But if I kept the pie in much longer the crust would have been toast. I did cover with foil on the edges but you can only cook it for so long.

Madeleine

Madeleine
Adele's picture

(post #36743, reply #10 of 11)

Did you use a knife to test the apples while baking?


Do you know I can't tell if something is soft with a knife?  Don't know why, but I have to use a fork instead.


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Glenys's picture

(post #36743, reply #11 of 11)

Pro kitchen thing; always use a paring knife, never have a fork around.

macy's picture

(post #36743, reply #3 of 11)

Jonathans should be available all over the midwest this time of year, and they make excellent pies even by themselves. Texture. Flavor. They're good on both counts. Give them a try.


Edited 11/30/2008 8:03 pm by macy

whatscooking's picture

(post #36743, reply #5 of 11)

I love jonathans as an eating apple too.  They're great.

The world is divided into two kinds of people: 
those who wake up thinking about what they're going to eat
for supper, and those who don't.


Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Sally Swift
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/