NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

apple pie

GShock's picture

apple pie (post #36823)

I was going to make an apple pie today, but the more I prepped, the more I thought that maybe I could save my work and use it for a holiday party on Friday.

When I make apple pie (actually, due to size, it is more of a cobbler), I generally go against the standard and use mostly red delicious, with something else. Today, the something else is Empire.

I have peeled,cored and sliced all the apples and placed them in an apple juice bath in baggies.

My question is, could they be frozen this way, and thawed later in the week for cooking?

GenE

suz's picture

(post #36823, reply #1 of 22)

Recently I accidently froze a bag of apples.  when I found them I put them in the refrigerator to defrost.  The apples turned soft.  Not edible.  I don't know if slices would react the same way.  But from this experience I wouldn't take the chance.

annieqst's picture

(post #36823, reply #4 of 22)

Interesting, though not surprising. However, I wonder the difference when frozen in unbaked pie form? I do this all the time and the pies are delicious and the apples still have texture (though perhaps that's because of the types of apples I grow).

suz's picture

(post #36823, reply #6 of 22)

I'm curious if you bake your pie from the frozen state and if so if that makes any difference.

MadMom's picture

(post #36823, reply #7 of 22)

I bake mine from frozen, starting in a cold oven.  They turn out great!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

veronica320's picture

(post #36823, reply #9 of 22)

Would you please elaborate on this? Oven temp, cooking time etc. Straight from freezer to oven? I'd like to try your method.
Thank you.

MadMom's picture

(post #36823, reply #10 of 22)

When I bought the pottery pie plates, that was the recommendation.  I just use the normal temperature for cooking an apple pie (I think that's about 400 degrees) and put the frozen pie in the oven.  I think that the heat from the oven preheating tends to cook the bottom better than if you put it in a preheated oven.  Cooking time varies - I just check periodically and take it out when it's nice and bubbly and the crust is done.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

veronica320's picture

(post #36823, reply #11 of 22)

I like this idea because I'd prefer the time/energy/mess economy of making several pies at once and have never been sure about freezing this stuff. Bake or freeze first, blah blah blah. Now I know. Will try your way with my tins next go-round.

Thanks.

MadMom's picture

(post #36823, reply #12 of 22)

I hope it works for you.  It has always worked well for me.  You might want to freeze one and try it, and if it works, freeze a bunch!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Glenys's picture

(post #36823, reply #13 of 22)

No double crust pie should ever be baked and frozen. The pastry is compromised from the moment it begins to cool, freezing only exacerbates the issue. On the other hand, all unbaked pastry loves being frozen.

veronica320's picture

(post #36823, reply #14 of 22)

Thanks - and to you, too Madmom. Now, one more Q if I may. Is it advisable to freeze unbaked stuff with leavening agents? I'm thinking specifically of scones. Have never been clear on this either.

Glenys's picture

(post #36823, reply #15 of 22)

Let's stick with scones, and the answer is yes. Now having said that, I don't like mine chilled or frozen, they're just not the same to me. Everyone else here at CT chills theirs and are happy as can be. It's just me, you know, an oddball.

veronica320's picture

(post #36823, reply #18 of 22)

Got it. Next batch, I'll cook, chill, and freeze thirds and report back in a different thread, post-tasting. For now, will say thanks again, and henceforth clear out of this apple pie discussion.

bonnieruth's picture

(post #36823, reply #19 of 22)

I, too, am excited about trying this. But did I miss something about pottery pie plates? Are they necessary?

MadMom's picture

(post #36823, reply #20 of 22)

Not at all, but NC has so much local handmade pottery, and you can find small sizes, which are perfect for the two of us.  I found the instructions on the pottery, and it works great, so I would imagine it would work for any other type of pie pan.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

TracyK's picture

(post #36823, reply #21 of 22)

It'll work, even in a cheap foil pie tin.


100,000 Mrs. Smith pies cannot be wrong, LOL.



"The world expects us to elect pompous yahoos and instead we have us a 47-year-old prince from the prairie who cheerfully ran the race, and when his opponents threw sand at him, he just smiled back. He'll be the first president in history to look really good making a jump shot. He loves his classy wife and adorable daughters."                          -- Garrison Keilor

annieqst's picture

(post #36823, reply #8 of 22)

Yep. Frozen into hot oven. The only thing I do is prick them before they go in. They turn out just fine.

Gary's picture

(post #36823, reply #2 of 22)

Probably not. They'll turn to mush. Make applesauce then.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

GShock's picture

(post #36823, reply #3 of 22)

Thanks, I guess I'll make this pie today, and do it again on Thursday evening.

GenE

Marie Louise's picture

(post #36823, reply #5 of 22)

Apples vary a lot in how they perform when cooked. (FC did a great article on it a few years back-it is on the website.)

I saute my apples in butter (and sugar, spices and lemon juice) before I put them in my pie. I would think if you used that method, the cooked apples might freeze well-but I've never tried it.

GShock's picture

(post #36823, reply #16 of 22)

I don't saute my apples before baking. I WANT them to cook down in the pie, to leave room for the final ingredient of about 1/2 to 3/4 c of cream which is added about 45 min into the baking.

What is the purpose of the lemon juice? Does the apple juice bath that I use, serve the same purpose?

Marie Louise's picture

(post #36823, reply #17 of 22)

No, it just adds a little flavor.

I cook them before they go into the pie so that you don't get that big air pocket in the top crust. I just hate that.

teebee's picture

(post #36823, reply #22 of 22)

I asked a similar question of Nicole Rees on the experts forum during Thanksgiving. The response is archived, but you can still read it. I froze apple pie filling in a pie plate (so it can just be popped into the crust--a suggestion from another poster--Gretchen, maybe?). You might want to check it out.