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Amarone and Food

PatricKinOnt's picture

A friend has offered to bring over a 1998 Amarone if I'll cook.  Sounds like a fair deal so I'm looking for pairing advice.  I find that this wine is extremely robust so hearty fair is in order.  Here is what I'm considering:



  1. Bison Rib-Eye w/ chipotle mayo, mashed sweet potatoes, and balsamic roasted veg.

  2. Roasted Rack of lamb w/ Dijon crust, blueberry jus, garlic mashed yukons, balsamic roasted veg.

  3. Grilled Angus rib-eye w/ bourbon peppercorn sauce, twice baked Potatoes, balsamic roasted veg.

I'll start with a fresh greens salad and I'm still deciding on dessert.


TIA!


 




 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #33818, reply #1 of 6)

Patrick,


When the meal involves a special wine like a Bordeaux or an Amarone with some age, then I tend to want to let the wine do the talking, not the food.  That sort of wine should be the star of the meal, I think.  So I try to keep the food simple, in order to let the special bottle of wine shine and show its stuff.  Each of your three menus sounds fabulous but, for me, they are too complex and will in each of their own ways take over from the Amarone.  Balsamic vinegar, for me has too potent of a flavor, as does lamb.  As does chipotle, peppercorns, blueberries and sweet potatoes.  For an Amarone, I would go with an osso buco, but without the gremolata (as the citrus peel will also ruin the wine).  Or a parmesam risotto (parmesan and Amarone are sublime together) served up with a saute of wild spinach and a piece of perfectly cooked veal or beef, perhaps with a small amount of jus.


cheers, Bonnie

ashleyd's picture

(post #33818, reply #2 of 6)

I'll second that, this is a pairing as in 'going together' not as in 'having a fight for superiority'. Keep the food relatively simple and stay away from too much acid.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

PatricKinOnt's picture

(post #33818, reply #3 of 6)

Thanks for the great input.  I see your point loud and clear. The Osso Bucco is out as I made this for the same guest in the fall.  To bad..:(. I do like the Risotto Idea but I made Rissotto Milanese with the Osso Bucco so I'm looking for something different.  I considered doing Braised Beef Short Ribs but another braised dish.... hmmm.


I'm really lacking inspiration on this one.  Oh well, I have a few weeks to come up with something.




 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
pamilyn's picture

(post #33818, reply #4 of 6)

How about a simple, really good grilled steak?

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Glenys's picture

(post #33818, reply #5 of 6)

One of the reasons it works well with braised short ribs is the hint of sweetness from the muffa nobile on those raisiny grapes, and the fat in the ribs harmonizes. Plus if it's not a great bottle, the fat helps with the tannins. If you want, you could do a beef tenderloin but serve it with a gratin of Parmesan potatoes. One thing it does love is beef or venison, gorgonzola and aged, good Parmesan. That would be simple and perfect.

Lee's picture

(post #33818, reply #6 of 6)

Amarone is wonderful with braised or stewed red meat and game.  Braised short ribs or braised or stewed lamb or venison would be among my first choices.  I think the grilled bison or ribeye would work, but I'd serve them with mushrooms or a mushroom sauce and simple sides.  You're right about it being a big wine.  Its high alchohol content (by law, it has to be at least 14%) doesn't make for a good match with spicy foods, but it pairs well with dishes that have a bit of sweetness.  Some of them are monsters, with alchohol at 15% or more, which IMO, isn't particularly food-friendly, but is fine with strong cheeses.  In any event, I'd save a little to enjoy with a cheese course.  Amarone is FABULOUS with parmigiano reggiano, gorgonzola and robiola.


Perhaps you should find out who the producer is and what the alchohol content is.  It could make a difference in your menu.