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Am looking for information on adaptin...

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25770, reply #1 of 9)

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What exactly do you mean. What kind of recipes? From what quantity to what quantity? I am sure you are not referring to cutting a recipe that serves 4 to one that serves 2.

cam14's picture

(post #25770, reply #2 of 9)

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Basically I am looking for info for when eggs, baking soda, baking powder and seasonings are used. Am able to cut back on entrees but in a quandry re: baking. Any help you can give me would help - kids leaving home & am used to cooking for more.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #25770, reply #3 of 9)

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I had a feeling you were talking about baking...that is indeed a quandary. Baking chemicals and other chemistry involved in baking make it difficult to pare down a recipe. (Not quite the same as taking 1 cup of carrots to 1/2 a cup of carrots.) If you can, bake your recipe(s) in smaller pans and freeze one, or a portion of what you are making. If you have some time, you may want to try
i new
recipes that yield smaller batches! :)

Jean_'s picture

(post #25770, reply #4 of 9)

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Bake the whole recipe bring part of it to a neighbor as a friendly gesture, or freeze it.

cam14's picture

(post #25770, reply #5 of 9)

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unfortunately, when I have a craving, I have a craving and right now I'm craving a blackberry creme brulee and I am not sure when baking in smaller pans how to adjust the time or am I going to be doing an awful lot of experimenting?

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25770, reply #6 of 9)

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I understand your problem. First many recipes for baked goods can be adjusted without too much trouble (cookies in particular). Although cooking times will vary depending on the size of your container, you should try to learn what a particular thing looks or feels like when it's done. I bake all of the time at work and I pay very little attention to how long things are supposed to take in the oven. Depends on container size, how much else is in the oven, which oven I am using, how warm the product was when it went in the oven etc etc. What I do know and actually all that I need to know is what does it look like when it is done.

When I first started culinary school, we all learned very quickly that asking an instructor how long it took for something to cook was greeted with the response "you are asking the wrong question". The correct one was "How do I tell when it's done?"

Just experiment. The only way to learn is by making mistakes. Have fun.

BTW, your creme brulee should end up with the same amount of jiggle no matter what size container you use.

cam14's picture

(post #25770, reply #7 of 9)

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oh, good - thanks for the advice - & I do like winging it - guess I won't have to change too much - kids will get lots of food and I will have variety.

Carolina's picture

(post #25770, reply #8 of 9)

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Thank heavens for the Wise-One. What would we do without her?

Sue_B.'s picture

(post #25770, reply #9 of 9)

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Hey, hi, excuse me but did you say blackberry creme brulee?! That sounds wonderful, would you share the recipe?
Re: reducing recipes for baking, I often halve recipes for quick breads & muffins, cookies, custards and cheesecakes with no trouble at all - go for it. Pay attention to baking times though since less mass will cook faster - as MC says, know what it looks like when it's done. I cannot speak for cakes with any confidence however, for sure it can be done but take time to experiment. I often find myself whisking eggs to blend so I can measure half an egg. An accurate gram scale is very helpful, so much easier that calculating tablespoons and teaspoons once you know the weight per measure of ingredients you commonly use. The conventional wisdom I've always heard is that you can halve or double a recipe for baked goods, but that is the limit; proportions change otherwise. Good luck.