NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Yeast Bread going stale and hard

cavmom's picture

Hi Everyone


I am new to making yeast bread and need some help on what I am doing wrong. Over the last couple of months I have made a few different types of bread and have pleased for the most part with all of them....at first. When they first come out of the oven, they are wonderful. I let them (loaves mostly) cool completely on a rack and then wrap in saran wrap. The bread is great for up to 24 hours. After that, the bread is stale and going hard. What am I doing wrong?


Jeanie

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #63445, reply #1 of 13)

Not a thing wrong

Jean's picture

(post #63445, reply #2 of 13)

It's the nature of bread without preservatives. Now you use it for toast, grilled cheese sandwiches, French toast, or croutons.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
KathiM's picture

(post #63445, reply #3 of 13)

Jeannie-  It seems that egg or milk based breads store longer.  Try Hallah.  Its one of my favorites.

butterscotch's picture

(post #63445, reply #4 of 13)

Breads made with honey keep well because honey is a natural preservative. 

DeannaS's picture

(post #63445, reply #5 of 13)

Sourdough breads will also keep longer. We bake about every 5 days - and our sourdough bread stays good in between bakings.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

SallyBR's picture

(post #63445, reply #6 of 13)

You may try breads that incorporate potato water in the recipe - or potato flour


Those tend to last a little longer


 

 

KyleW's picture

(post #63445, reply #7 of 13)

As has been pointed out; A) you aren't doing anything wrong, B) It's the nature of the beast, and C) milk and eggs help. 


Milk and eggs help because of their fat content. That's why oil and butter help as well. Enriched doughs will always outlast lean doughs on the counter.


Sourdoughs seem to have a mystical keeping quality. My last loaf lasted nearly 2 weeks, for toasting purposes :-)


 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

cavmom's picture

(post #63445, reply #8 of 13)

Thanks everyone. Now that I think about it, the herb loaf that I made with olive oil in it, did stay fresher longer than the other breads I made. Also made an oat loaf with honey that was the same. So far I have not attempted any sourdough recipes. It's on my list to do when I get more comfortable with the more simple loaves first. I will keep your suggestions in mind when I try new recipes now. My husband loves all my experimenting.


Jeanie


Edited 3/4/2005 3:09 pm ET by Jeanie

CHandGreeson's picture

(post #63445, reply #9 of 13)

I am fairly new to bread baking, as well. I have found the recipes in Greg Patent's Baking In America amazingly easy to follow; they turn out amazing, too!

I bake his recipe for buttermilk bread for lunches, etc. It is an enriched recipe: buttermilk, butter, and egg! It makes 2 loaves, one which is eaten almost immediatly by my DH, the other I let cool completly and then double-wrap and freeze. I let it thaw at room temperature and then slice as needed (same as fresh bread) and I have had it last for almost 2 weeks.

Gretchen's picture

(post #63445, reply #10 of 13)

Rather than wrapping in Saran, put it in a plastic zip loc  bag .  Might extend it a bit, but it does depend on the type of bread as others have said.  If it is French type, it will be stale in 12 hours!!


Gretchen
Gretchen
KyleW's picture

(post #63445, reply #11 of 13)

I'm in the Saran Wrap camp. I find that there is less chance of freezer burn. It's also important for the thawing part. Bread should thaw at room temp, still wrapped. This maintains the breads moisture as it thaws. If you lose the moisture the bread goes to s*** way to fast.

 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

Gretchen's picture

(post #63445, reply #12 of 13)

She isn't mentioning freezing.  But I don't think saran is as air tight, but it probably just a matter of degree.

Gretchen

Gretchen
KyleW's picture

(post #63445, reply #13 of 13)

I made the , a-s-s- of you and me, assumption that she was freezing. My bad!


 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry


Edited 3/21/2005 8:20 am ET by KyleW

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.