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Using a banneton

Jean's picture

Using a banneton (post #64282)

in

Having just received a beautiful oval banneton from a fellow CTer, I was googling for the best way to use it. I came across this site and fell in love with this bread. Of course I don't have a lovely sourdough starter, but this bread is enough to make me want to start one.


How do you other bread bakers use your brotform/bannetons? Do you have a favorite recipe that works well?


In the mean time- it's lovely as a part of a centerpiece on my dining room table. :)




Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Gretchen's picture

(post #64282, reply #1 of 87)

Well, now I'll have to use one of mine!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
RuthWells's picture

(post #64282, reply #2 of 87)

By banneton, I assume you mean a linen-lined basket? I have a few and have used RLB's pugliese recipe in them. The key is to rub lots of rice flour into the fabric before using.

Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Gretchen's picture

(post #64282, reply #3 of 87)

Or not lined, as the one shown in the link.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Amy's picture

(post #64282, reply #5 of 87)

I'm not sure if this is a stupid question or not, but I'll go ahead...  Do you wash it or somehow clean it afterward? 

Glenys's picture

(post #64282, reply #6 of 87)

Most bakers don't wash them and bakeries certainly don't.  A good solution for those who don't use it as often is to simply put it in a plastic bag and pop it in the freezer. 

assibams's picture

(post #64282, reply #7 of 87)

I never wash mine. But I am very careful: lots and lots of flour, especially for the rye breads, or else turning the loaf out can result in total disaster. Stuck on dough will harden and can be peeled off, the excess flour gets tapped out - clean enough for me ;-)


Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Gretchen's picture

(post #64282, reply #8 of 87)

And I can probably attest that bakers REALLY don't wash them. I got a bunch of these at a flea market a number of years ago and several folks on the board got them. But they had the benefit of a lot of bleach and scrubbing before they were sent!!  BIG chunks of dried dough!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
Amy's picture

(post #64282, reply #9 of 87)

Thanks everybody!  Gretchen, that's hysterical. 

MadMom's picture

(post #64282, reply #10 of 87)

Never knew how much work you had to go through to get those to us.  I've used mine several times.  Of course, baking bread and losing half a Sally don't go exactly hand in hand, but I might just have to decide which is more fun.  That's a no brainer, isn't it?



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

RuthWells's picture

(post #64282, reply #11 of 87)

Nope. I guess I should wrap it and freeze, as I'm not using it that often.

Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Glenys's picture

(post #64282, reply #4 of 87)

For the definition and look of the bread you'll need to flour it generously, and I'm mean generously, so it stays dry during the fine rise in the basket.  I've only used breads that aren't as wet and loose and those we've been making recently.


Although we usually did sourdough ryes etc it them, you can use any recipe if it's not too wet.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #64282, reply #12 of 87)

take a look at this one, Jean

http://ilforno.typepad.com/il_forno/2004/07/chestnut_and_ro.html

darn it, now I am craving a banneton.... :-(

will it ever end?

 


 


"You don't scare me. I've got a Jack Russell and he is the Chief"

Gretchen's picture

(post #64282, reply #18 of 87)

I will check my "stash". Mine are oblongs.

Gretchen

Gretchen
SallyBR1's picture

(post #64282, reply #25 of 87)

I ordered one.... see what this forum does to people?????

(huge sigh)

 


 


"You don't scare me. I've got a Jack Russell and he is the Chief"

DeannaS's picture

(post #64282, reply #26 of 87)

Think of it as skill-building. It was only a few short months ago that you were terrified to try the no-knead bread recipe, and here you are buying bread-baking accoutrements. You go girl.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

schnitzel's picture

(post #64282, reply #13 of 87)

A brotform/banneton provides structure for the bread dough during fermentation. I prefer to line it with a well floured linen/flax towel. The towel is allowed to dry after use then placed in a zip bag and stored in the freezer. (That towel gets used when making fresh pasta, too.)


My favorite bread for this is the sourdough black olive. And now I bake it in my LC oven which is the best yet. You can just barely see the concentric circles from the brotform. I brush off excess flour after the bread cools.


If you'd like some starter to play with, I can send you some. Lemme know.


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MadMom's picture

(post #64282, reply #14 of 87)

Amy, I would love some starter if you have some to spare.  I've tried to keep it several times, but usually ended up moving or otherwise being unable to save it.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

schnitzel's picture

(post #64282, reply #15 of 87)

No problem, I love to share it.


I just checked and still have your address.
Will let you know when I ship it.


MadMom's picture

(post #64282, reply #16 of 87)

Thanks so much...not only are you a search guru, but you're a nice person, too.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

schnitzel's picture

(post #64282, reply #17 of 87)

Aww... shucks. ;·)


schnitzel's picture

(post #64282, reply #27 of 87)

Jean and MadMom...


Sorry for the delay. DS#1 had borrowed my car while his truck was being worked on. Just got my wheels back last night. I sent out your packages with fresh starter this morn—priority mail—so, hopefully 2 or 3 days. Let me know when it arrives. I put the starter in small glass jars and cushioned it with lots of bubble wrap. ;·)


MadMom's picture

(post #64282, reply #28 of 87)

You're a sweetheart!  I do hope you included instructions, or will post them here, because I tend to destroy living things.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

schnitzel's picture

(post #64282, reply #31 of 87)

I'm working on some instructions and will post them here. It's very easy to care for.


Gretchen's picture

(post #64282, reply #29 of 87)

I sent some of my potato starter to my sister one time. It exploded all over the package!!  It is a vERY active starter. When I have taken it to Denver (back when you could carry such), I had to loosen the cap several times during the flight!!  Exciting stuff, that.  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
FitnessNut's picture

(post #64282, reply #30 of 87)

I've done something similar - the first time I attempted to bring my starter with me when we moved, I put it in a thermos. BIG mistake. Ended up putting what was still left in the thermos down the drain en route.

My current starter has moved across Canada twice now, with great success. I spread thin layers of the stuff on parchment lined baking sheets and let it dry, then break up the pieces and pack in jars. At the other end, soak in water until "gluey", then feed it several times. This is a very inexact thing, just go by feel. Each time I end up with a far more potent and active starter than I had before drying. I imagine that this would also be a great way to share....

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell
Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell
schnitzel's picture

(post #64282, reply #32 of 87)

Wow, that's lively stuff!


I put a very small amount of starter in the jars, less than a 1/4 full. That's also how I received it from KAF years ago. It was in one of those glass French canning jars. I think they ship it in plastic containers now. I'm not too crazy about plastic.


Jean's picture

(post #64282, reply #33 of 87)

Oh--that's exciting. Thank you. This is going to be fun!



Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
schnitzel's picture

(post #64282, reply #34 of 87)

That's the attitude!  Yes, it is fun and easy.


Here are some simple instructions.

When you receive your starter, you can either:
a) place it in the fridge until you want to use it, or...
b) feed it, if you want to make bread.


The first time you feed it, remove from the bottle and place in a glass or ss bowl.
Add 1 cup of lukewarm water and stir to incorporate the starter.
Add enough flour to make a thick batter consistency, at least 1 cup flour.
Cover with plastic wrap.
Leave on countertop or place in cold oven to grow slowly, overnight.


Once your starter is ready to use, try a recipe like the one in the link Jean posted. That recipe uses a cup of starter and there will be enough leftover to:
a) Put a few ounces back in the jar it came in, label, and tuck it away in the freezer. This is your backup.
b) Put the remaining starter in the fridge until its next use. You really only need to keep a few ounces going.


I've kept this starter going for about 20 years. It can remain dormant in the fridge for some time. I'm sure I let it go a year when my kids were very young. If it goes unused for too long, you can give it a couple of feedings to get it up to snuff again.

Ideally, using it once a week keeps it pretty happy. I normally feed my starter the night before making bread, using 1/2 cup water and a bit more than 1/2 cup flour. This will yield 1 cup of active starter for a bread recipe and a few ounces to go back in the fridge until next time.  If I'm in a big hurry and need to use it in a few hours, it goes into a warm place (cold oven with just the oven light on). It grows much faster in a warm environment, but no more than 85°F.


Please DO NOT just feed it and put back in the fridge.
It's really unnecessary to have copious amounts of starter.


Is this clear?


MadMom's picture

(post #64282, reply #35 of 87)

Thanks so much...I have printed that out and am just waiting for the baby to arrive!  Your instructions sound so much better than the ones I've tried before, where you fed copious amounts of flour and water to the starter, then threw away so much of it.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

schnitzel's picture

(post #64282, reply #37 of 87)

Some people make this so much harder than it has to be. And making lots of starter only to throw most of it away is insane. It's no wonder why these folks give up after a while.