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SOS - Tacky Royal...

chiffonade's picture

SOS - Tacky Royal... (post #64933)

in

No, not a badly dressed queen - I made white royal icing and iced my gingerbreads.  Then the rains came.  We've had steady rain for two days and my royal icing is still tacky.  I'm kind of #&#@^@ because it's been gloriously DRY here in ATL for quite a while.


Any suggestions on how to dry the icing?  Anyone think it would be OK to powder the cookies with some confectioner's sugar?


I'm giving it one more day and will give out the cookies tomorrow to BF's office mates.  Thanks for any suggestions.


"Sandra Lee is the Culinary Anti-Christ and I am the Anti-Sandra Lee.  The precious moments you may take to measure a level cup of flour are NOT wasted time!"


Chiffonade

*You're a REAL person, eat REAL food."

Chiffonade

Canuck's picture

(post #64933, reply #1 of 7)

I don't think sprinkling sugar will add much in terms of looks.


I don't know if it's foodsafe, or if that matters, but those little sachets in running shoes are there to absorb moisture. If you're at the mall today, you could grab one, and enclose it and the cookies in a tin. I bet it would work overnight.


Otherwise, I'd set a fan over them. I'm doing these tomorrow with 13 kids.


Edited 12/11/2008 10:23 am ET by Canuck

Gretchen's picture

(post #64933, reply #2 of 7)

Pretty sure not food safe!! 


Put them in a bag and draw at least a partial vacuum with the FoodSaver?


Gretchen
Gretchen
Canuck's picture

(post #64933, reply #3 of 7)

Well, I know you're not supposed to eat them, but unless they are giving off toxic gas...


I wouldn't trust wet cookies in the Foodsaver. I know what would happen if I did it: they'd start tilting and then become one solid sticky chunk. I know my limitations :)

teebee's picture

(post #64933, reply #4 of 7)

Did you try asking Abby Dodge? She's taking questions in the Ask the Experts forum. She's been pretty quick with responses. She wrote the article about royal icing in the Cookies issue.

chiffonade's picture

(post #64933, reply #5 of 7)

I posted the question here and at baking911.com.  I got an answer from them but it didn't seem feasible.  She recommended I use a blow drier to help evaporate the water.  I tried it out on one cooky and it worked but I had too many to consider this option.


I figured "how could I administer heat to at least one tray at a time."  So I hatched up the following.  I took out the top oven rack.  I put the lower rack all the way on the bottom rung.  I turned on the broiler and let it get good and hot.  I turned OFF the broiler and placed a tray of cookies on the bottom rack and timed it for 12 minutes.  The icing dried pretty thoroughly! 


One of these days I'm going to give up royal icing altogether...


"Sandra Lee is the Culinary Anti-Christ and I am the Anti-Sandra Lee.  The precious moments you may take to measure a level cup of flour are NOT wasted time!"


Chiffonade

*You're a REAL person, eat REAL food."

Chiffonade

beejay's picture

(post #64933, reply #6 of 7)

Those little dessicator bag thingies are usually silica gel.  Sometimes put in salt to keep it free from clumping.  Chemically the same as sand.  So you are right.  Not edible.  But it wont hurtcha.


BJ


 


Gardening, cooking and woodworking in South'n Murlyn'


Edited 12/12/2008 10:25 pm ET by BeeJay

Gardening, cooking and woodworking in South'n Murlyn'
Gary's picture

(post #64933, reply #7 of 7)

Sand is silicon dioxide. Desiccant packets are usually sodium metasilicate. The pure stuff would not likely harm you in the quantities usually used, but the stuff in the packets also contains toxic additives, such as cobalt chloride (changes color dependent on moisture levels).


Edited 12/12/2008 10:33 pm ET by Gary

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.