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Shipping cookies?

dixie1's picture

Shipping cookies? (post #63280)

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What is the best way to package cookies for shipping, also what kind of cookies hold up better? Adele, I think you do this every year so I would be happy to hear your suggestions, as well as everyone else. TIA.

meow's picture

(post #63280, reply #1 of 24)

I have sent biscotti and shortbread. They work well--I wouldn't send chocolate chip or anything, because the chocolate might melt or the cookie might fall apart. But biscotti and shortbread are shaped well for packing and you can pack them tightly enough so that they won't move around much in your container.

Lots of bubble wrap!

 

Singing Die Zauberflöte in English is like eating at the Olive Garden.

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63280, reply #2 of 24)

Anything but a really delicate butter cookie should ship OK if you pack it well. I know some people who stack them up and slide them inside a mailing tube. I usually individually wrap them in saran and nestle them in a tin. As long as they are snug enough not to move around they'll be fine.

Biscuits's picture

(post #63280, reply #3 of 24)

I use a combination of materials.


First I put one layer of packing peanuts in the bottom of the box/tin.  Then a layer of bubble wrap.  Then put in the cookies, which have been placed in a ziplock bag, layered with tissue paper (the foodie kind) between layers.  Then on top another layer of bubble wrap.  This usally works for me, including shipping to places like Iraq and Kuwait.



Life is tough - but it's tougher when you're stupid - Major Jeffrey F. Richardson, USMC


Edited 10/19/2004 2:30 pm ET by Biscuit

Ancora Imparo -

Marcia's picture

(post #63280, reply #16 of 24)

How does "foodie" tissue paper differ from the regular old kind? I haven't a clue.

KyleW's picture

(post #63280, reply #17 of 24)

I think it's probably a production sanitation issue. I don't think the texture of the papers is all that different. I use 'deli' paper I buy at a restaurant supply store.

 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

Marcia's picture

(post #63280, reply #18 of 24)

Thanks, Kyle. When I've used tissue to mail or gift food items in the past, it did not come in direct contact with the food, so I suppose either could be used.

KyleW's picture

(post #63280, reply #19 of 24)

I agree. If it ain't touchin' food it don't matter. You can stuff the shippinig box with newspaper. But I use tissue to immobilize my cookies inside the bags.

 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

Adele's picture

(post #63280, reply #4 of 24)

I do a combo.  I don't put peanut things or bubble wrap IN the tin, but I wrap the tin in bubble wrap and then do a layer of peanuts on the bottom of the shipping box, put the tims in, then fill any little areas with more peanut things.  (the white things). For the tins themselves, I stack 4 or 5 or 6 cookies,  wrap in christmasy plastic wrap, nestle the stacks as close as I can, and cut manilla folders up to make dividers.  The only cookies I had break were pepper cookies that I knew were too delicate but did it anyway.  I even shipped CM's chocolate cookies w/the cherry and not one broke.  I think the key is packing as tight as possible, you want no movement at all when you shake it. (the box) LOL 

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

ebarlow1's picture

(post #63280, reply #6 of 24)

Could you refer me to "CM's chocolate cookies w/the cherry" recipe?  Last night I ate a dark chocolate bar with cherries, pecans, and praline, which was heaven, and then I made cookies, which were also yummy but they weren't chocolate, and they all went to the boy scouts anyhow.  So chocolate and cherry cookies would be something to look forward to tonight.

Adele's picture

(post #63280, reply #8 of 24)

Libby- the recipe is here somewhere, I'll try to find it tonight.  They are excellent.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

ebarlow1's picture

(post #63280, reply #9 of 24)

"here somewhere" is all I needed.  I found 'em - thanks!

helena's picture

(post #63280, reply #5 of 24)

Packing them tight is what i try to do as well, and I have always used bubble wrap as a filler for the box as well.


I shipped decorated cookies, and must say that some did break, but that isn't as abig a problem if you just want to send them because they're tasty I think ;o)

KyleW's picture

(post #63280, reply #7 of 24)

I ship cookies as often as possible. Through trial and error I have come to the conclusion that you have to do 2 things. First you have to immobilize the cookies inside a container and second you have to immobilize the container insode the shipping box. I ship my cookies in tin-tie bags, the kind of bags used for coffee beans. The bags fit two paper baking cups side by side and each baking cup holds 3 or 4 cookies. I can stack the baking cups 2 or 3 levels high depending on the cookies in question. I seperate the layers with a thin piece of cardboard. I fill the void in the bag, between the last layer and the top of the bag, with deli paper (waxed paper works well too). Filling the void keeps the cookies from moving inside the bag. I use newsprint to pack the cookies inside the shipping box. I get the newsprint at the local moving supply store.


This may sound involved but it works. I have been shipping cookies for two years and have only had a 3-4 complaints about broken cookies. I ship all kinds of cookies; biscotti, chocolate chip, oreo type sandwich, shortbread, sugar cookies etc.


Hope this helps :-)


 



 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry


Edited 10/21/2004 6:06 am ET by KyleW

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

Sandi_Beach's picture

(post #63280, reply #10 of 24)

Hi Kyle - where do you get the bags from?  Sounds like they'd keep the cookies a whole lot fresher too.....

KyleW's picture

(post #63280, reply #11 of 24)

I get the bags from PaperMart.

 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

dixie1's picture

(post #63280, reply #12 of 24)

Kyle, thank you so much for this info (also everyone else) and especially for the site to order the bags. Neat stuff there. Now if I can just make some good cookies, I am set.

RheaS's picture

(post #63280, reply #13 of 24)

What's your best-selling items? Those chocolate sandwich cookies look amazing. I'll put in an order next week. My cousin and her new husband will be returning from their honeymoon this weekend and I'd like to send them something for the extra effort they made to include my family in their wedding. They live near Princeton, NJ, so not too far to ship.

KyleW's picture

(post #63280, reply #15 of 24)

I think that the Killer Kitchen Sink Cookies are probably my #1 Seller. They have a bit of everything in them; chocolate and white chocolate chips, raisins, oats, coconut, pecans... The chcolate sandwich cookies are pretty high on the list as well.


Shipping to Princeton is easy. I have discovered a little secret about FedEx Home Delivery. Home delivery is the residential equivalent of FedEx Ground. It's the cheapest service they offer and seems to be cheaper than UPS Ground. The secret is that addresses in the northeast (I'm in NYC) get next day delivery! I've had things show up next day as far away as New Hampshire. And it's not a fluke. It happens like clock work!


 



 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry


Edited 10/21/2004 2:12 pm ET by KyleW

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

cookie1's picture

(post #63280, reply #20 of 24)

You may or may not have the answer, but if I ship from the southeast to the northeast would that theory still stand?


Thanks for the info.

Cheryl

It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

KyleW's picture

(post #63280, reply #21 of 24)

I couldn't swear to it, but there is a way to check. If you go to the fed ex site you can get rate quotes. Choose FedEx Ground and it should give you the cost and the expected delivery time.


 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry


Edited 10/22/2004 12:09 pm ET by KyleW

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

cookie1's picture

(post #63280, reply #22 of 24)

That's a grand idea. I sure hope the rates are that great so that I can send cookies to my little cookie monsters in RI. The request have started coming in. Thanks!

Cheryl

It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

KyleW's picture

(post #63280, reply #24 of 24)

They will tell you how many days it will take. If it's more than 3 I use Priority Mail from the Post Office. The rates are the same as ground and they "guarantee" 2-3 day deliver to most areas in the country.


 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

BorisYeltsin's picture

(post #63280, reply #14 of 24)

We send baked goods over to Iraq every week. This is what we do.We get an 8x8x8 box from the US Post Office. Line it in 4-5 layers of wax paper which hang over the top, and long enough to tuck over a full box by at least the full width of the box, e.g., 8 inches on each side. So each piece is 24 inches wide, OK, 8 for the bottom, and 2 8's for each side, OK?Pack the coookies really tight in a single layer. If there is extra space at the sides, then use plenty of wadded up wax paper to take up that space, not newspaper. Add a sheet or two of wax paper over the cookies on top, then start a second layer. Again, use wadded up sheets of wax paper to take up space. Continue stacking the cookies until you reach the top.

You really want to pack them very very tight. At the top of the box, fold over the sheets of wax paper ya'all put there at first, and use more wax paper wadding to take up top space. I pack the cookies right to the brim and then fold over the wax paper. You want it so tight that if you shake it, nothing moves and the box is dificult to close. Otherwise, it is crumb city, OK?

Close the box and tape the living daylights out of it. I don't seal the cookies with bags or seal a meals, OK, I use tape on the box. So really use a ton of tape, going all three directions, including the sides. 2 layers each direction. The 3 directions are length, width, and the sides. 2 full layers, about a half a roll of tape. Smooth out the wrinkles and check to make sure it is fully sealed.

Take the next size box which is a 10x10x10, and line it in crumbled newspapers and place the cookie box in the center, and stuff the sides with lots of wadded up newspaper. You really want the box tight, and dificult to close, and buldging. Again, the concept is that there is no movement.

Mail as usual.I have tried the seal a mean and baggy thing, and at least for Iraq does not work. The packages are really manhandled by machines and humans, and your package will be dropped from a height of 5 feet or so dozens of times. The problem with the baggies is that while the cookies arrive fresh, they are a pile of crumbs when they arrrive.

The tight pack thing has been recommended by the Internet Service we use to identify needy soldiers as working really well, and over the past 2 years, we have tried many methods, and this works best for me.

Regards, Boris"Sir, I may be drunk, but you're crazy, and I'll be sober tomorrow" -- WC Fields, "Its a Gift" 1934


Edited 10/21/2004 12:58 pm ET by BORISYELTSIN

Regards, Boris "Sir, I may be drunk, but you're crazy, and I'll be sober tomorrow" -- WC Fields, "Its a Gift" 1934
MadMom's picture

(post #63280, reply #23 of 24)

My DD and I packed up "halloween baskets" to send to each member of my DSIL's unit in Iraq.  We put the candy, etc., which wasn't chocolate directly into the baskets, which were nylon around springy coil forms, shaped like pumpkins and some were ghosts, etc., then added all sorts of stickers, Pez dispensers, various snacks (Pringles, goldfish, doritos, cheetos, etc., all in Halloween bags) then topped each basket with a vacuum packed bag which contained frozen chocolate candy (we froze it solid, then vacuum packed it, then put it back into the freezer.)  Everything made it intact, and the chocolate wasn't even melted.  DSIL thought we were crazy, but the guys and gals in his unit really seemed to enjoy it.  After all, as my DD says, especially if the children are young, daddy eats all the candy they collect anyway!

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin