NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Red currant cake

Eisje's picture

Red currant cake (post #65152)

in

I have lots of red currants in my garden and would like to make a cake with them, something along the line of a pound cake or a coffee cake, the berries mixed in the batter and baked. The batter would have to be pretty thick to keep the berries suspended, wouldn't it? Does anybody have a recipe or ideas?


Olena

Gary's picture

(post #65152, reply #1 of 32)

I would think that they would behave the same as blueberries, so any recipe designed to hold blueberries ought to work for you. Red currants are usually used to reinforce the flavor of other fruits, such as almonds, cherries, pears, and raspberries.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

Eisje's picture

(post #65152, reply #2 of 32)

You are right, red currants do not have an outspoken flavour of their own, I was thinking adding some orange zest to the batter. Or almond extract? Thanks for the ideas!


Olena

mireillec's picture

(post #65152, reply #4 of 32)

I would also use a little more sugar and vanilla.

mireillec's picture

(post #65152, reply #3 of 32)

To avoid your berries to sink at the bottom. keep 2 TBS of your dried ingredients once it's mixed, and mix with the berries.

Eisje's picture

(post #65152, reply #7 of 32)

Thanks for the advice, I will keep it in mind.


Olena

assibams's picture

(post #65152, reply #5 of 32)

If you can wait until tomorrow, I'll type out a wonderful cake that is just like you described what you wanted. Baked, light, airy, the red currants are in a meringue type topping on top of a moist cake, very yummy.


Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Eisje's picture

(post #65152, reply #6 of 32)

I can wait, actually I was planning on baking it tomorrow evening. So if it's not too much trouble, I would love your recipe! It sounds wonderful.


Olena

assibams's picture

(post #65152, reply #8 of 32)

Will do, 'see' you tomorrow (off to downstairs for a last sip of Chilean red wine)


Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Eisje's picture

(post #65152, reply #9 of 32)

Enjoy your wine and thanks in advance!


Olena

assibams's picture

(post #65152, reply #10 of 32)

So, finally, here's the recipe for you, taken from Rudi and Karl Obauer's 'Unsere Österreichische Küche'. I hope you'll enjoy it as much as I do. You could add some vanilla to the dough, but I do not think it is necessary at all. The cake part is only the base for the very flavorful red currants.


Ribiselkuchen Ribisel is the Austrian word for currants


6 eggs (you need to weigh one of the eggs for its weight)
6 'eggweights' sugar
4 'eggweights' soft butter
salt
4 'eggweights' flour (the cookbook recommends using equal parts regular flour and 'griffiges Mehl', the latter is labelled as Instant Mehl in Germany, a little finer than semolina perhaps; this helps give the cake more structure)
1 tsp baking powder
butter and flour for the baking sheet


4 egg whites
150g sugar
salt
1 Tbs finely ground almonds
1 tsp corn starch
500g red currants (off the stems)


 


Preheat the oven to 180°C. Grease and flour a baking sheet.


Cream the sugar and butter with a pinch of salt until fluffy and light in color.
Beat the eggs lightly and add to the buttermass, stir until smooth.
Mix the flour and the baking powder and carefully fold into the egg batter.


Spread the dough/batter onto the prepared baking sheet and bake approx. 20 minutes.


For the topping whip the egg whites with the sugar and a pinch of salt to stiff peaks. Fold the almonds, corn starch, and red currants into the meringue mass.


Spread the topping onto the prebaked dough, and bake at 200°C (upper heating element only) for another 5 minutes.



Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Eisje's picture

(post #65152, reply #11 of 32)

Looks wonderful, thank you so much! Only one detail missing: how large should the baking sheet be? Or how thick the batter layer?


Olena

assibams's picture

(post #65152, reply #12 of 32)

Since all of my sheets are too shallow or have rounded edges I used a frame that is 30x40cm. IIRC the finished cake layer was around 3-4cm high, the topping being about the same height.


Dang, now I've made myself really hungry for cake ;-)



Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Eisje's picture

(post #65152, reply #13 of 32)

Wonderful, looks like I will have enough to treat my neighbours as well. =) I will report on how it goes.


Olena

assibams's picture

(post #65152, reply #14 of 32)

Definitely, the recipe says it makes enough for 12 servings :-)


Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Eisje's picture

(post #65152, reply #15 of 32)

O my, it is very pretty and delicious! And easy! Thank you so much for the recipe, it is a keeper. I hope more people try it, it deserves to be in the tried and true folder.


Now, where do I keep it till tomorrow? Fridge? Will the meringue start weeping?


Edited to add, I made 2 28cm cake rounds, that serves definitely more than 12! I am taking one of the cakes to work tomorrow.


Edited 7/6/2009 3:59 pm by Eisje

assibams's picture

(post #65152, reply #18 of 32)

I've kept leftovers in the fridge, but never longer than a day. Not because it wouldn't last, merely because it was gone before. IIRC the meringue did not weep.


It is a nice, easy recipe, isn't it! Great idea to make it in round pans.



Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Maedl's picture

(post #65152, reply #16 of 32)

Thanks for the recipe from me, too! I've been wondering what I could do with currants, other than making a jam. This has also made me wonder if I could make muffins with red currants--instead of blueberries. The currants here are always so beautiful, but in my kitchen underutilized.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
plantlust's picture

(post #65152, reply #17 of 32)

WooHoo!  Another recipe to try.  Red & black currants are ripening here.


Ah said Dooooctahhh, ain't there nothin' I can take. Ah said Dooooctaaaah, to relieve this belly ache.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

assibams's picture

(post #65152, reply #20 of 32)

Here, too. I have only black currants and Jostaberries (a cross between black currants and gooseberry), plus a puny little gooseberry bush in my garden. So far I have harvested at least 4 quarts of black currants, with another two bushes to go. Haven't touched the Jostas yet, they are even more prolific this year than the blacks. Enough gooseberries for some jam and some cakes.


BTW, the recipe does only work with red currants. I've tried it with black currants and didn't care for it, not enough acidity.



Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

assibams's picture

(post #65152, reply #19 of 32)

Go ahead and make the muffins, I'm sure they will be wonderful, yet absolutely different than with blueberries. I know I have more red currant cake recipes in another baking book from Austria, if you want I can have a look and post what I find.



Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Maedl's picture

(post #65152, reply #21 of 32)

I'll give it a try--I love the way the red Johannisbeeren look at the market--like a box full of jewels!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
assibams's picture

(post #65152, reply #22 of 32)

like a box full of jewels


You've nailed it! I am always amazed at how shiny those berries are, so beautiful. If only they didn't have those seeds that get stuck in my teeth....


Jelling my black currants as I type. I need to harvest those remaining bushes, plus the Jostaberries. I will be making lots of Creme de Cassis (and Creme de Josta) this year, too. Want a bottle?



Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Maedl's picture

(post #65152, reply #23 of 32)

I'd love a bottle! How do you make it?

If I am feeling very artsy, I will find a red Johannisbeeren bush and take a photo of the berries backlit by the sun. It's so lovely--you can see those troublesome seeds, but they look gorgeous!

Gotta run--I have a bunch of errands and then tonight a friend is coming for dinner, which will be fresh fava beans, mashed, topped with greens. For the greens I'm using Stielmus, which looks a whole lot like rapini if you ask me, dandelion greens, arugula, and beer-radish greens! It's hard to get big quantities of greens here--not the favorite Bavarian food!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
assibams's picture

(post #65152, reply #24 of 32)

How about you come on up and pick up a bottle personally? I have been procrastinating the straining from last year's batch, also because we discovered that we preferred our Cassis with a longer steeping time. Since I need the containers again soon, I will have to get going with them within the next few days. 


Basically I mash up some black currants, add some good quality Cognac and let it sit for at least 6 months. Strain, add sugar to taste, let stand for another 2 weeks until the sugar is completely dissolved. Bottle. That's it.


I grew Stielmus once in our veggie garden. Can't say I loved it, but it sure was easy to cultivate *g* I could send you a truckload of different wild greens, including arugula (grown from seeds my mom gathered in Italy some decades ago).



Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Maedl's picture

(post #65152, reply #28 of 32)

I've been playing around with the idea of a short trip to a monastery on the Altmuehl that is noted for its food (Plankstetten)--I'd like to check that out, so if I do, maybe I'll make it a slightly longer trip to your area!

I love the idea of making the cassis--it sounds so good. Any special recommendations on the brand of cognac?

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
assibams's picture

(post #65152, reply #30 of 32)

Most likely Spätzle Mehl is the same as Instant. Does it say 'Doppelt-Griffig' anywhere on the bag? If so, that's what you want.

As for the Cassis, I use good quality cognac, but try to avoid big names/brands because of their prices. Any 3 or more star or VO (or better) will do. If it's good enough to drink straight, it'll be fine for Cassis. Also I try to get the highest alcohol percentage, some cheaper brands only have 37% or even less. Last year's was from Aldi, this year I bought a VO from Kaufland.


Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

plantlust's picture

(post #65152, reply #25 of 32)

Griffiges Mehl.  Do you use all-purpose flour instead?  Do we(that the US) even have something that can be used?


You put de lime in de coconut & drink it all up.

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

assibams's picture

(post #65152, reply #26 of 32)

You can use semolina (the finer variety). Or use all all-purpose flour in the recipe. I like the Griffiges Mehl in it, gives the cake more structure and 'bite'.

In Austra griffiges Mehl is a staple, every household has both types of flour, griffiges is perfect for dusting as it won't clump, the flour of choice for 'Nockerl' or Spätzle... In Germany it is called Instant Mehl, I have no idea why and what the instant part of that flour is *g*


Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Maedl's picture

(post #65152, reply #27 of 32)

I'll have to look the next time I go to the grocery store to see if they have Instant Mehl--I know they sell Spaetzle Mehl, but since this is Bavaria, we're different!! I was amazed at how good spaetzle are when I used the Spaetzle flour.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
sanderson's picture

(post #65152, reply #29 of 32)

Do you think Wondra would do the trick?