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recipe for applesauce

wendy1's picture

recipe for applesauce (post #63467)

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Hi,


Does anybody have a really good applesauce recipe. A friend of mine was wondering if I had a recipe. Unfortunately I don't. So I thought I'd try finecooking.com forum. 


What apples make the best applesauce. Granny Smith? an apple that will not turn to mush. From what I can remember all you have to do is add sugar and water to the unpeeled apples.


Wendy


 


 

Gretchen's picture

(post #63467, reply #1 of 38)

I kind of think of applesauce as mush. I don't think Grannies would make good sauce. Golden delicious, cortland, McIntosh.  Cook, run through a food mill.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #63467, reply #2 of 38)

Right on.  Get a variety of really ripe apples, wash and quarter, no peeling or coring necessary, cook to mush in the microwave, run through the mill and add some vanilla.  If the apples are ripe, you won't even need sugar.

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AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63467, reply #4 of 38)

I peel mine, b/c the food mill I have access to is old and a true PITA. When I lived alone, I didn't have a food mill, and I found a potato masher and once around in the FP makes a dern good chunky style with nice large chunks.

I find food milled applesauce waaay too much work and waaay too smooth. But it does impart a creaminess you can get no other way. AND, you don't have to peel.

Kind of 6 in one hand, half dozen in the other when it comes to food processor versus food mill for applesauce.

But just incase she doesn't have a food mill, food processor applesauce is great, too.


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

ashleyd's picture

(post #63467, reply #10 of 38)

Seems like American applesauce is a whole different creature to British apple sauce which tends to be chunkier, you certainly couldn't (even if you wanted to!) make our apple sauce by your method. For my apple sauce peel, core and cut up roughly, different size chunks give the best result. Barely cover the base of a pan with water, add the apples, sprinkle of lemon juice to stop discolouration, sprinkle of sugar if the apples are tart. Cook over low heat until the apples start to break down, stirring occasionally. Taste, add more water, lemon juice or sugar as needed.


“In victory you deserve Champagne, in defeat you need it.”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63467, reply #16 of 38)

That's about what I do! I LOVE basically plain cooked apples. The wee child needs to have smooth, though, so out pops the FP. I did try the vanilla in hers last time, and she loved it. But vanilla is so expensive right now, I'm not using in applesauce, which is delicious without it.

When I was a kid, I loathed my mother's homemade - I thought the peels made it bitter. And pink. Oh, she loved to make sure there was enough peel in there to make it pink. Blech. And she put it through the food mill (same one we still have), and it was like baby food. Double blech.

But apparently, I like British style applesauce! You learn something new about yourself everyday...


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63467, reply #3 of 38)

I make my homemade applesauce thusly:

1 5 pound bag of Ida Red, Jonagolds, Fuji or other sweet-tart/firm apple. Avoid Macintoshes (personal preference in flavor), red or golden delicious (get mushy) and Granny smiths (too tart).

Peel and core apples, and cut into quarters.
Put into a large stockpot.
Add enough water or apple juice to come halfway up the mass of apples. If you are unsure, use less water. You can always add some more later, but it's hard to unadd water.
Cover, and cook over medium low heat until they are the desired firmness. They will still be in recognizable shape as apples.
Drain them, but save the liquid.
I usually cook mine about 20 minutes, but I'm serving a toddler, so those are a tad soft for me. On my own, I cook about 15 minutes for firm and chunky.

For smooth style, just whiz the cooked apples and some of the cooking liquid up in a food processor. I like mine more like little chunks of cooked apples, so I actually just mash with a potato masher and only a bit of the cooking liquid. You only want to use enough liquid to get a good texture. You can whiz up the apples first, then add liquid.

No sugar, no Splenda is needed when you use a sweet-tart apple.

Now, I have to go peel my apples that have been sitting around for a week waiting for me to make applesauce for the wee one. She HATES store bought now. Smart child.


DON'T PANIC

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- Douglas Adams


Edited 3/16/2005 12:38 pm ET by Amy, Ellie's Mommie

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

Lexi's picture

(post #63467, reply #5 of 38)

The one from The New Basics is our hands down favorite.  My SIL made it to accompany pork chops one night, and we all but licked the bowl.  No matter what I serve it with -- perfectly roasted pork loin, meltingly tender braised brisket, picture perfect baked ham -- the applesauce gets the raves!  If you like a sweeter applesauce, use larger Macs (or an extra Mac) and smaller Granny Smiths, or vice versa for a tarter version.  We've doubled the recipe, but it's almost as quick and easy to do one batch while preparing the apples for another batch.


Chunky Applesauce (Serves 4)


2 McIntosh apples


2 Granny Smith apples


1 cup water


Juice of 1/2 lemon


1/2 cup sugar


1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon


Halve, core and peel the apples.  Cut the Macs into 6 wedges each.  Cut the Granny Smiths into 1-inch chunks.  Combine the apples, water, and lemon juice in a deep microwavable-safe 2 1/2 quart casserole (I use Corning).  Toss the cinnamon and sugar together in a small bowl and add to the apples.  Cook, uncovered, at full power (650 to 700 watts) for 5 minutes.  Stir, pressing the apples into the liquid, and return to the microwave.  Cook for an additional 5 minutes.  Using a potato masher, coarsely mash the apples, stirring them into the liquid (or mash to a smoother consistency, if desired).  Cool to room temperature, cover and refrigerate. 



I forgot to add that the Macs fall apart, while the Granny's stay firm enough to add texture.  The sweet-tart flavor of the applesauce as well as the texture is great.


Edited 3/16/2005 2:39 pm ET by lee

 

Sbonch's picture

(post #63467, reply #6 of 38)

BH


i just made delicious apple sauce last week with very ripe golden melinda apples, i put in about one quarter cup of water for about 8 cups of cut apples and let it cook away. I then dumped into the food processor et voila' it was delicious! no sugar no nothing added only plain apples.

Lexi's picture

(post #63467, reply #7 of 38)

I've never heard of melinda apples, but I don't think you'd want to omit sugar when using Granny Smiths.

 

 

sommersu's picture

(post #63467, reply #8 of 38)

Have you ever put a hit of vanilla in your applesauce..give it a try.

Jean's picture

(post #63467, reply #9 of 38)

Not paying attention, suz.  http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=22145.3  and it's only back 6 posts. :)

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
tachris's picture

(post #63467, reply #11 of 38)

i use a variety of apples, usually whatever is on-hand.  i make applesauce in a variety of ways, but now like to cook whole organic apples quartered, couple of cinnamon sticks, and cranberries (about 1:3 ratio).  i cook just until soft then put through food mill.  the color is wonderfully rosy because of the cranberries and apple peels, plus slightly tart.  i then add vanilla, additional cinnamon if desired, and a touch of butter if i'm using it right then and hot.  the butter hardens on outside edges/top so doesn't look appealing when chilled.  you can add sugar or other sweetner to suit your particular taste. 


 


i do like mine chunky, too, but haven't figured out how to do that and still cook with peels on.  i love cranberries so i try to put them in everything i can.

ashleyd's picture

(post #63467, reply #12 of 38)

I do like mine chunky, too, but haven't figured out how to do that and still cook with peels on


That is fairly simple, but takes a little more work, just take one or two apples from your bag, peel, core and cut into chunks, cook separately and then add back to the milled applesauce. Adjust taste of the overall mixture.



“In victory you deserve Champagne, in defeat you need it.”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Lword's picture

(post #63467, reply #13 of 38)

>i do like mine chunky, too, but haven't figured out how to do that and still cook with peels on.


Next time try quartering lengthwise those you want to ultimately peel but remain in chunks. After cooking they should come off easily.


I like it best hot with butter or cheese and definitely chunky. Plums add nice color too - I added a few peeled and mashed toward the end once and the kids loved it but it could have been the honey butter they added like gravy. Thanks also for the vanilla idea!


>i love cranberries so i try to put them in everything i can.


Thanks for the cranberry hint - I love them too. They look so beautiful in pear halves. I heat them until they begin to pop then turn down the heat and add butter and saute and usually just eat on the side. What other foods do you especially like them with? I don't care for them in grain dishes, don't know why. 


L.
L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
Heather's picture

(post #63467, reply #14 of 38)

I like mine chunky and I do it in the oven. It's hard to give you a recipe because there is a vast difference with types of apples cooked this way. I use a mixture of whatever looks good in the market or someone has given me, peel and cut in chunks. Put in a heavy covered braising pan with just a few tablespoons of water and whatever spices/vanilla/etc you like and cook in a very low oven (300 maybe) until it is done the way you like it. You have to check it fairly often until you get the feel of how the apples are going to behave. Beware--it is slow to start but goes from chunky to gloppy very quickly. The apples have a really rich concentrated flavor this way.
Sorry this is so vague, but I do it at various temps depending on how much time I have, how much attention I can give the pot, etc. Next time I should write down what I do.

zendo's picture

(post #63467, reply #15 of 38)

My momma often put the red cinnamon hearts from valentines day in while it was cooking. 


-zen


 

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63467, reply #17 of 38)

Could this be done in a crockpot, too, you think? Or does the oven roasting add some carmelization to the apples?


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

Heather's picture

(post #63467, reply #18 of 38)

I think the oven roasting adds a lot of richness of flavor, but I've seen crockpot applesauce recipes so it must work too. That wouldn't take as much watching, that's for sure. I should have added to my post that one time I got busy in the garden and forgot about the applesauce in the oven and it got so thick that it burbled out of the pot and all over the place--thank heaven for self cleaning ovens.

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63467, reply #19 of 38)

Oh goodness, that must have been a mess!

I'll try your oven method next time I make applesauce. I love oven roasted veggies, so I'll probably love this! I'll save a crockpot version for the time after!


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

sommersu's picture

(post #63467, reply #20 of 38)

Martha Stewart does a oven roasted applesauce....but you need to Cuisinart or stick blend it as the apples stay whole.

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63467, reply #21 of 38)

No prob for me, I usually pulse it in my FP once or twice anyway.


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

wendy1's picture

(post #63467, reply #22 of 38)

Hi,


Thanks everyone for the suggestions. All I have in my fridge right now are McIntosh apples. So I'll have to pick up a few other varieties at the grocery store later on.


Seems I'm the exception. I prefer mine  Smooth and creamy.


Can't wait to get in the kitchen and experiment.


 


Wendy

Gretchen's picture

(post #63467, reply #23 of 38)

I happen to love MacIntoshes. Make your sauce from them.

Gretchen

Gretchen
AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63467, reply #24 of 38)

If you like Macs, by all means, use them to make applesauce! Especially if you like it smooth and creamy. They do that very well.

I just have a personal loathing for them. I think they are mealy. They aren't, but I think they are. It's totally me. I'd venture to say I have a Macintosh prejudice, lol!

But they are perfectly fine apples for those who like them, and I'm well aware my dislike of them is just silly, but there you go.


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

KarenP's picture

(post #63467, reply #25 of 38)

I just have a personal loathing for them. I think they are mealy. They aren't, but I think they are. It's totally me. I'd venture to say I have a Macintosh prejudice, lol!


If they're old or there isnt' enough rain in the growing season, they're mealy. 

TracyK's picture

(post #63467, reply #26 of 38)

I don't care for the texture of Macs when raw, but I love the flavor... and they're great in cooked things.

GeezeLouise's picture

(post #63467, reply #32 of 38)

I think you have to eat Macs right from the tree because the texture and flavor changes SO rapidly after they are picked. I eat my fill the day we pick them but the rest are used for sauces, etc. because of the texture change.

Lexi's picture

(post #63467, reply #33 of 38)

I find that apples get mealy if they aren't refrigerated.  Have any of you found that to be true?

 

 

KarenP's picture

(post #63467, reply #36 of 38)

I find that apples get mealy if they aren't refrigerated.  Have any of you found that to be true?


Apples need humidity and cooler than room temperature is better.  If you don't refrigerate you should at least have a damp cloth around them.  I refrigerate with damp towels or papertowels.

Lexi's picture

(post #63467, reply #37 of 38)

Really!  I've never heard about damp towels before.  I refrigerate them in the plastic bag I bring them home in, which probably acts in a similar way to keep moisture from evaporating.  I'll have to try the damp towel and see if it makes a difference.