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Pumpkin Bread

anneelsberry's picture

Pumpkin Bread (post #63279)

in

Made this yesterday afternoon and had to make a second loaf in the evening because the kids had devoured it.  Very easy, from Fanny Farmer, though I add dried cranberries.


Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a loaf pan.


Sift together 1 1/2 cup flour, 1 cup sugar, 1/2 tsp salt, 1 tsp baking soda, 1/2 tsp cinnamon, 1/2 tsp nutmeg, 1/2 tsp ground cloves. Toss 1/2 cup dried cranberries in flour mixture.


Mix together in a separate bowl 1 cup pumpkin puree, 1/2 cup vegetable oil, 1/4 cup water, 2 large eggs.


Combine wet and dry ingredients gently.  Fold in 1/2 cup roughly chopped walnuts.  Scrape into buttered loaf pan and bake for 1 hour.


Somebody put a stop payment on my reality check!

Somebody put a stop payment on my reality check!

APonKP's picture

(post #63279, reply #1 of 46)

Thanks Pomona, I love Pumpkin quickbreads and cookies.  I think I have a recipe for Pumpkin pancakes, too.  Not that you would even need a recipe for pancakes.

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
AnnL's picture

(post #63279, reply #3 of 46)

Uhm, well, as someone who couldn't make pancakes on Sunday because we didn't have Bisquik (hanging head in shame) I would love a recipe for pumpkin pancakes!  We did have pumpkin in the cabinets. 


 


AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

APonKP's picture

(post #63279, reply #18 of 46)

Ann, I know I have a recipe that I have used before, but can't find it at the moment.  Here is a pumpkin one from Margaret Fox, breakfast chef extraordinaire, whose Cafe Beaujolais in Mendocino is now closed.  I doubt that few breakfast recipes from her could be bad, so here goes.

PUMPKIN AND GINGER PANCAKES            makes 10 to 12 pancakes

1 cup All Purpose flour
1/4 t salt (I'd use a little more if Kosher)
2 Tbsp. brown sugar
1 t baking powder
1/2 t baking soda
1/2 t cinnamon *          
1/2 t nutmeg *              
1/2 t powdered ginger *
1 egg, beaten
1/2 cup plain yogurt + 3/4 cup milk  (or you could use 1 1/4 cups buttermilk if you have that instead)
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
2 Tbsp. melted butter       ( I might use canola oil if I am in a rush.  Oil makes a moist pancake.)

If doubling this recipe, which I would probably do, I think I'd prefer NOT to double the amount of spices.  Actually, I might prefer to just use ground ginger here, but you might like all the spices together better.)

Serve with GINGERED BUTTER  (and warm maple syrup)

2 Tbsp. finely chopped candied ginger
1/4 cup softened butter


If I find the one I have used, I will post it.  I think you can safely substitute
pumpkin puree for some of the liquid in most buttermilk pancake recipes and add spices to taste.



Here is one of my favorite pancake recipes from Marion Cunningham.

LEMON PANCAKES      (12 3" pancakes)  ( These are extemely light.  I double this recipe for the two of us!)

3 eggs, separated
1/4 cup AP flour      (Yes, only 1/4 cup)
3/4 cup cottage cheese
1/4 cup butter, melted   (Here I never sub oil for the butter.  You need the butter for flavor and texture.)
2 Tbsp. sugar
1/4 t salt
1 Tbsp. grated lemon zest

In a bowl, stir ( I use a whisk) together the egg yolks, flour, cottage cheese, butter, salt and lemon zest until well mixed. 

Preheat griddle over medium heat.

Beat the egg whites to stiff peaks ( careful, not too stiff or dry).
Fold beaten whites into the yolk, cottage cheese mixture. 
Spoon out about 3 large tablespoons of batter for each pancake onto greased griddle.  I take a cold stick of butter and smear it just where the pancake will be, just before I spoon it on.  Cook slowly for about 1 1/2 minute, then turn and cook about 30 seconds.  Keep pancakes warm in a 250 degree oven untill all are finished and ready to serve.

These just melt in your mouth, and they are healthy , too!  Don't let the idea of having to beat the egg whites separately keep you from making these.  I keep a copper bowl handy on the potrack. Grab it, wipe it out with vinegar and salt, grab a whisk, and whisk away.  They are done in seconds.  Or, hand it to your DH, and tell him to whisk away.  When he tastes these pancakes, he will gladly do it every time.

These are wonderful topped with powdered sugar and a squeeze of lime juice, or fresh berries or other fruits like peaches that have been warmed in maple syrup, or quince poached in a sugar syrup with a little lemon juice added. 










One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
RheaS's picture

(post #63279, reply #19 of 46)

Thanks AP! I love those lemon pancakes and the pumpkin ones sound terrific. I have Evening Food: Cafe Beaujolais and the recipes all look scrumptious. All I've tried so far is one of the bread recipes.

APonKP's picture

(post #63279, reply #20 of 46)

You're most welcome, Rhea.  I don't know about Evening Food!  We have many fond memories about gorgeous days in Mendocino, and luscious food at Cafe Beaujolais.  The pumpkin pancakes are from Morning Food, 

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #63279, reply #21 of 46)

I just ordered Evening Food from Half.com.  Thanks!  How did I miss that one?

APonKP's picture

(post #63279, reply #24 of 46)

Ann, it looks like you never saw my reply to your request for pumpkin pancakes.  I wouldn't want you to think I ignored you.  It's earlier in this thread.


One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
AnnL's picture

(post #63279, reply #25 of 46)

Thanks, no I hadn't seen it.  I was away and this thread slipped off the radar screen.  Those pancakes sound sooo good!  Can't wait to try them, although I think we'll be trying the lemon ones this weekend!

AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

KyleW's picture

(post #63279, reply #27 of 46)

Where are you in Central Mass? I was an inmate at NMH for a year :-)

 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

AnnL's picture

(post #63279, reply #28 of 46)

In Hubbardston, north and west of Worcester.


NMH??


AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Jean's picture

(post #63279, reply #29 of 46)

Northfield Mount Hermon?

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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KyleW's picture

(post #63279, reply #30 of 46)

Northfield Mount Hermon?


BINGO! Although we used to refer to it as Northfield Mental Hospital, or Not My Home, or Never Much Happiness...  :-)


 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

AnnL's picture

(post #63279, reply #31 of 46)

Never heard of it, but I googled and it looks like a nice place to be incarcerated.  Western Mass is really pretty.


 


AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

KyleW's picture

(post #63279, reply #32 of 46)

Western Mass is really pretty.


I agree. My fondness for it is much greater now than it was then :-)


 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

APonKP's picture

(post #63279, reply #34 of 46)

You will love the lemon ones, I'm sure.  Just be sure to beat the egg whites just to a "soft peak".  They are like little moist clouds.  : )

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
Syb's picture

(post #63279, reply #36 of 46)

What happened to Cafe B.?  I always hoped to go there some day, but never made it.  Do Margaret Fox and DH have plans for another restaurant?  I have enjoyed her first cookbook.

APonKP's picture

(post #63279, reply #41 of 46)

Sad to say, Margaret and her husband divorced.  I think his name was Christopher Kump.  He is Peter Kump's son. They had a child, too, I think.  The restaurant closed, and I don't know if she has done anything else in the food world.  It used to be a great destination.  : (

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
RheaS's picture

(post #63279, reply #46 of 46)

That is sad. They write so lovingly about each other in the Cafe Beaujolais Evening cookbook and they look very happy in the pictures. It won't be the same flipping through that cookbook now.

Wolvie's picture

(post #63279, reply #38 of 46)

AP - I just now caught this thread - fab recipes from you per normal.


My family will probably love the pumpkin pancakes -
I'm sure I will prefer the lemon! :-)


 


"Through pride we are ever deceiving ourselves. But deep down below the surface of the average conscience a still, small voice says to us, 'Something is out of tune."  Carl Jung

 

APonKP's picture

(post #63279, reply #42 of 46)

I will treasure that nice compliment!  Coming form you, especially.  : )

The lemon ones are sooo good.

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
Wolvie's picture

(post #63279, reply #39 of 46)

beating the egg whites is a great trick for pancakes.


I beat them for regular pancakes, a bit beyond soft peaks, I'd say medium, and then fold it in - superb results.


"Through pride we are ever deceiving ourselves. But deep down below the surface of the average conscience a still, small voice says to us, 'Something is out of tune."  Carl Jung

 

APonKP's picture

(post #63279, reply #44 of 46)

Here's another good pancake recipe that calls for beaten egg whites.  I make these sometimes too.  They are from Don Chappellet here in Napa Valley.  Marion Cunningham calls them Zeppelin Pancakes because they are so light.

2 eggs, separated
1 1/2 cups buttermilk
1/2 cup sour cream
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, melted
! cup flour
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt

Mix yolks, buttermilk, sour cream in bowl 'til well blended.  Add butter and stir just until mixed.  Sift dry ingredients together and add to the liquid mixture, beating until smooth.   Beat egg whites until stiff but still moist.  Gently stir into batter.

Note: This batter keeps well in the refrigerator for several days.  It will lose a little of its airiness, so just stir in another beaten egg white.

My note to myself:  If increasing his recipe x 1/2, don't double the salt.

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
Wolvie's picture

(post #63279, reply #45 of 46)

this sounds very similar to the recipe I use - except no sour cream.


Zeppelin's eh? too funny!


"Through pride we are ever deceiving ourselves. But deep down below the surface of the average conscience a still, small voice says to us, 'Something is out of tune."  Carl Jung

 

DeannaS's picture

(post #63279, reply #35 of 46)

I tried those pancakes. They pretty much failed. Of course, I did do some substitutions, so I should try it again with all the right ingredients. But, the consistency was all wrong. They were so thick that they wouldn't cook through, and then I thinned them and there were too thin. Grrr.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

AnnL's picture

(post #63279, reply #37 of 46)

I didn't get to try them this past weekend, so I'm hoping for this coming Sunday.  I'll make them without substitutions, so I'll let you know how they turn out.


 


AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

APonKP's picture

(post #63279, reply #40 of 46)

I just looked at this recipe again and right off the bat, I would add more salt than 1/4 teaspoon, even if she wrote it for plain old Morton's.  No, wait, there's only a cup of flour.  I would probably add 1/2 teaspoon of Kosher salt for us.  How about making them with all buttermilk?  Yogurt seems to make pancake batter thicker for me, even though I like it.  I sometimes thin it with orange juice.  Other than that, I cant' figure out why the batter was too thick.  Did you use only one cup of flour?  This is the type of batter that you want to barely mix with the liquid, but you probably already know that.

If I have time this weekend, I'll try them.  Sorry they didn't work for you.


One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne


Edited 11/18/2004 4:21 pm ET by AP on KP

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.  A.A. Milne
DeannaS's picture

(post #63279, reply #43 of 46)

Tis okay. One of the changes that I made was to use all buttermilk (because I had it). So, I wasn't sure if that caused it to be too thick or not.

And, yes, I did "barely mix" it. I'm not sure why it didn't turn out, either. Of course, my toddler was helping by being the official "dumper" which sometimes results in things getting a little chaotic. So, perhaps I royally screwed it up and just didn't notice.

(They also seemed too "eggy" in flavor to me. Toddler had no problem with them, though.)

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

RHart18's picture

(post #63279, reply #2 of 46)

That's funny!  I just made this about a month ago because I needed something to take to a blood drive and pumpkin was the only thing in the cabinet!  Every one loved it.

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #63279, reply #4 of 46)

Pumpkin bread!  Wow . . . fantastic, outstanding, delicious!  I had planned on trying your recipe, but today, while dashing through Whole Foods, I sampled a piece of their pumpkin bread.  It was very good, but no nuts.  Sheesh!  I love nuts.  I went right home and made your recipe.  The  only thing I added was 1/2 tsp. of vanilla, which I think I will add to the original recipe. 


I happened to have all the ingredients, even the dried cranberries.  Raisins would work well, but the cranberries add a little zing.  I'll be making another loaf in a few days.


This recipe needs to be in the T&T.  If no one else tries it, I'll vote twice!  Thanks for posting.

RHart18's picture

(post #63279, reply #6 of 46)

I would second it for tried and true.  Can you belive it?  Little old Fanny Farmer comes out with a winner!  That was the first cookbook I bought when I got married, and I still use it (17 years later).