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Pierre Hermé Desserts

Meryl's picture

Pierre Hermé Desserts (post #63442)

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Has anyone tried any of Pierre Hermé's recipes? I just got two of his books, "Chocolate Desserts" and "Desserts." There's an extensive thread on his desserts at egullet.com, and I was just wondering if anyone here has made any of them. (It looks like I'd better learn how to use a pastry bag - many of the recipes call for one, and I'm pastry bag-impaired). 


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Jean's picture

(post #63442, reply #1 of 68)

Me too.  I was just about to add them to my birthday want list.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


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RheaS's picture

(post #63442, reply #21 of 68)

Both Herme/Greenspan books are less than $15 from Jessica's Biscuit (ecookbooks.com). The szechuan peppercorn truffles in the chocolate book are excellent. All the truffles and candies are very good. I made the simple chocolate mousse last week and it really was simple yet delicious. I can't remember all the ones I've tried from the dessert book, but one that stands out is the Mozart Cake with the 24-hour apples. Also, the blueberry-mascarpone cheesecake.


(I haven't read all the threads, but I saw one with my name on the MIA list. I've been sick since Christmas and recovering slowly.)

Adele's picture

(post #63442, reply #22 of 68)

That's a long time to be sick, hope all  is okay now?

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

RheaS's picture

(post #63442, reply #27 of 68)

Winter is always terrible for me (SAD, every cold and flu that comes around, etc.), but going home to Vancouver for Christmas then having to come back to Illinois made things worse. I have decided that it's possible to become physically ill from severe homesickness. Of course, the slow recovery could have been from all the crap food that I ate for most of the last two months: instant ramen, fast food burgers and fries, fish sticks, frozen convenience foods, etc. I'm fairly certain that my dogs ate better. I've only started cooking again the last couple of weeks. I also went on a food shopping splurge: several new cookbooks (All About Braising, Olives Dessert Table, Babbo cookbook and a couple of others), a $50 order of chocolates and other baking supplies from lepicerie.com, vanilla beans, pots/pans and other goodies from TJ Maxx and Tuesday Morning. The end of being in bed 80% or more of the time was not good for the pocketbook. Despite the spending spree, I finally gave my resignation notice at work about a month ago and moving back home at the end of May.  I have to stay until then to pay off some American bills and to train all the people who will be taking over my various responsibilities. I didn't realize how much work I actually do until having to document every single thing. I've been lucky that winter is usually a slow time for me at work.

MadMom's picture

(post #63442, reply #28 of 68)

Glad you're feeling much better.  When you say you're going home, is that back to Vancouver?  There's a good sized CT contingent there, and it is my "second home" so perhaps we shall yet get to meet.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

RheaS's picture

(post #63442, reply #29 of 68)

Yes, back to Vancouver and I'm not the least bit ashamed of moving back in with my parents. They now live in Coquitlam and the house is fairly close to the Homesense where ShoeChick and Glenys bought those marvelous dish towels.

FitnessNut's picture

(post #63442, reply #30 of 68)

Welcome back to CT. Glad to hear that you are feeling better. When are you planning to move home? I can certainly appreciate homesickness.....I haven't been able to get home for almost three years now. Hopefully we can squeeze in a visit before we move overseas this summer.

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell
KathiM's picture

(post #63442, reply #31 of 68)

 what a beautiful area!  What do you think about the book All about braising?

RheaS's picture

(post #63442, reply #49 of 68)

I haven't tried anything yet, but I have a long list of recipes to try and I bought it on the recommendation of several people here. THere's a  post somewhere.

SallyBR's picture

(post #63442, reply #34 of 68)

Well, glad to know you are feeling better - May is just around the corner, not too long to wait


I remember feeling totally miserable when I moved to Paris in Dec 1993 - never want to feel like that again, life is too short


 


 


 

 

jillsi's picture

(post #63442, reply #37 of 68)

You shouldn't be ashamed or embarrassed or ANYTHING. I lived at home off and on for many years and listened to a LOT of other people snarking about how I should live MY life. The fact is, different degrees of involvement and interdependence work better or worse for different families. And the idea that grown "kids" and their parents can't or shouldn't rely on each other is, to me, utterly wrong (to say nothing of coldhearted and sometimes just plain MEAN).


Now I live next door to my Mom, probably forever, but we have an agreement that if one of us ever can't make it on her own, we sell one house and add on to the other and do whatever we can to cooperate.


Enjoy your family and do whatever's right for YOU.



 


 


Edited 3/3/2005 5:04 pm ET by jillsifer

 

 

FitnessNut's picture

(post #63442, reply #38 of 68)

Good advice there, Jillie. Wish more people thought like that....the world would be a much better place ;-)

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell
KathiM's picture

(post #63442, reply #39 of 68)

I'm with you.  Other cultures dont find any addvantage in generations living separately.  What is our problem?  i've had both my parents and  Jims with us at one time or other.  Mom lives with us now.  If she hadnt moved in she probably wouldnt be among the living now.  She eats better, gets her meds, alll the loving nagging she can stand.  In return she is companionship, helps with the house, and I dont have to worry about maintaining her house and mine.  If she needs help Im  there.  It takes a lot of worry off me and her.

UncleDunc's picture

(post #63442, reply #40 of 68)

>> Other cultures dont find any addvantage in generations living separately.

I would say instead that they don't find enough advantages to outweigh the disadvantages. I suspect that if you look carefully, you'll find that cost is the main disadvantage of generations living separately. As soon as a society accumulates enough wealth that separate households are economically feasible, grown children start moving out.

>> What is our problem?

Our problem is the same as it has been throughout recorded history and in every known society and culture, selfishness.

A big one for me is climate. My parents and most of my siblings live in Maryland and Virginia. Been there, done that, ain't going back. One sister lives in Buffalo. I've never been there, but I suspect it's not a big improvement. My dad smokes. That's a problem for me. I'm an indifferent housekeeper, at best. (Let's be honest; I'm a slovenly housekeeper. At best.) That's a problem for most of my extended family. Little kids are a problem for me, except in very limited doses. My youngest nieces and nephews are still little kids, and the older ones have already started having little kids.

Power and control issues are a problem. "While you live in our house you'll live by our rules" grates no matter which generation is making the rules.

MadMom's picture

(post #63442, reply #41 of 68)

You've made some very good points, and I agree with all of them.  I think Jillsifer's solution is a great one - two separate houses, but next to each other.  For quite a while, I lived four doors from my Mom, and I could walk over for morning coffee or an evening chat.  It was great, and it didn't involve either of us trying to live with the other's rules or peculiarities. 



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

KathiM's picture

(post #63442, reply #52 of 68)

We actually looked for a place in Oregon like that- a carriage house set up.  I agree it woulod be ideal to be close but seperate.  It affords the most options for everyone.  Unfortunately she couldnt wait that long.

KathiM's picture

(post #63442, reply #51 of 68)

I hear you about the rules.  My parents always told me that when i ived in their house I had to follow their rules.  If I didin't like them I could get my own house and make my own rules and when they were there they would have to follow them.  Be careful  what you tell your children becuase it may come back to haunt you one day.  Mom smokes.  I dont alow it in the house.  She respects that.  My daughter is older so no small kids driving her nuts.  Just older kids and me to drive her nuts.  Living with other people is always a compromise.  I am fortunate to be able to work out thaose compromises necessary for us.  I dont say we never have our differences.  But we have been able to work them out so far.  If she isnt happy she knows she can go back to living independently any time she wants.

RheaS's picture

(post #63442, reply #47 of 68)

Being neighbours would actually be the ideal situation for me, and I hope to eventually do that if I can get some money saved for a down payment in their neighbourhood. The move back home was also precipitated by seeing how much my parents needed me there. They're both in their mid-60s, my mom's health isn't great, my dad is having problems working full-time and learning how to take care of himself and my mom, and they're getting on each other's nerves :D We all annoy each other to some extent, but we work well as a team. Plus, I really miss the Sunday family dinners.

Glenys's picture

(post #63442, reply #55 of 68)

Yahoo, I live in Port Coquitlam. Amazing what love will do to a dedicated downtown dweller. I lived in West Van the first ten years on the coast but once I moved to Mount Pleasant, there was no going back. Then along came the sailor and his Port was Coquitlam. This is very exciting for our little fests.

RheaS's picture

(post #63442, reply #56 of 68)

Did you have any problems with the recentish mudslides and flooding in PoCo?  My dad got stuck for hours and hours trying to get home from downtown. I think it was something to do with Dewdney Trunk Rd. and bus drivers not going to work, but I'm not all that familiar with Coq/PoCo area. We drove through Port Moody a couple of times on the way to the North Shore where we still have many ties. Port Moody has changed lots since the last time I was there (10-12 years ago?). It's cute but maybe getting too yuppiefied. I'm hoping to find a decent job in the Coq/PoCo/Port Moody area. I don't want the long commute. I think my dad leaves home at 5:45AM. I hope to still be in bed at that time or at a gym.

Glenys's picture

(post #63442, reply #57 of 68)

The flooding was just past us at the Pitt River bridge, although the bridge wasn't the problem, it was the grade of the intersection that gathered rain forming a car-deep lake. No way to cross the river and let all those people home.
The drive isn't great but I set my own schedule and drive at odd times compared to the normal traffic, and I always listen to the traffic report. If there's a problem on the Port Mann bridge, it can back up to Burnaby. I used to live five minutes from everything and now I live fifty minutes to anything.

Wolvie's picture

(post #63442, reply #32 of 68)

good for you! Sounds like just what you need to do. Plus, as you know, Vancouver is not tough to take. :-)

Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 

 

Adele's picture

(post #63442, reply #35 of 68)

Rhea-  Good for you for taking control and making changes in your life.  Depression is no fun at all and anything that can help can only be good. 


(You have no idea how much I want to visit the Canadian side of CT, now I have yet another reason to visit)


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

RheaS's picture

(post #63442, reply #48 of 68)

You and everyone else is welcome to come visit. We have one extra room plus a queen-size sofa bed, a futon and a large L-shaped sofa.  Plus another extra bedroom if my parents do decide to go on an extended Pacific Rim vacation later this year. We don't have the amazing kitchen of the Three Crotch Dog Inn, but we do have 2.5 dogs (my two plus a Westie who comes and visits often). There's also a hot tub that's waiting for me to clean it before it can be used by anyone.

deejeh's picture

(post #63442, reply #36 of 68)

Sorry to hear that you've had such a bad time this winter.  Although it's hard to tell, I'm sure spring is almost here, and that'll make you feel better for sure.  Anticipating the move back to the Wet Coast is probably lifting your spirits as well.


deej

butterscotch's picture

(post #63442, reply #67 of 68)

It can be very hard to return to Illinois from anywhere on the west coast in the middle of winter. I used to have that problem when I lived in Chicago and would spend the December holidays at home in southern California. I can remember landing at O'Hare in early January and taking a taxi back to the near North side. Most years, the part of Lake Michigan that was visible from the taxi was frozen over, stark white, and had thick vapors rising from it. It was like landing on another planet . . .maybe Jupiter. It was always depressing and got harder as time passed. I solved the problem by moving back home to LA and have always been glad about my decision. Hang in there! 

Adele's picture

(post #63442, reply #23 of 68)

Patisserie of Pierre Hermé (English/French Edition)
by Pierre Herme, Pierre Hermé,
ISBN: 8472120759
Publisher: Montagud Editores
Publish Date: 1997
Binding: Hardcover
List Price: USD 179.95   !!!!


Edit:  Not that I would know, HaHa, but free shipping for over $25.00, which happens to be what Chocolate Desserts and Desserts come to- $27.96.  Two more for 'the pile'.  (re- Jessica's)



But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!


Edited 3/2/2005 3:44 pm ET by Adele

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Jean's picture

(post #63442, reply #24 of 68)

Welcome back. Hope you're much better now. Cyber hugs.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Wolvie's picture

(post #63442, reply #26 of 68)

glad you are getting better - and welcome back! :-)

Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 

 

RuthWells's picture

(post #63442, reply #2 of 68)

<Covering ears with hands........ I do not need any more cookbooks, I do not need any more cookbooks, I do not need any more cookbooks........>


If they're marvelous, take pity and please don't tell me, 'kay?  ; )


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

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