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NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookie

Gary's picture

There is an interesting article in today's NY Times on making the perfect chocolate chip cookie. One of the keys is resting the dough 24 hours before baking off. Another is the size (no corner-worthy jokes please).

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/09/dining/09chip.html

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

Marcia's picture

(post #64767, reply #1 of 57)

You'll notice that the article considers 36 hours the optimal resting time for the cookie dough. I wonder what happens after that?

Did you see that bread flour was used in the recipe? It seems to me that this should have been addressed, too.

Gary's picture

(post #64767, reply #2 of 57)

The bread flour might explain why the prolonged dough rest. You would think it made the texture tougher.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

Marcia's picture

(post #64767, reply #3 of 57)

That was my thought, and I do wonder if there would be less need for waiting time with AP flour - seems strange.

deejeh's picture

(post #64767, reply #4 of 57)

Alton Brown has a recipe for chewy chocolate chip cookies that uses bread flour and melted butter.  IIRC, the dough only rests for an hour or so in the fridge.  The cookies are really good.


deej

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #64767, reply #5 of 57)

I usually let my cookie dough rest for 24-48 hours. It's a tip I originally got from Alice Medrich. I use AP flour, and it still makes a big difference. You get chewier, more toothsome cookies.

Gary's picture

(post #64767, reply #7 of 57)

I looked through my Jacque Torres' books. At one point he was using pastry flour and later AP. He did mention bread flour if you wanted a cookie that would have a high rise and yet still be chewy. I'm beginning to wonder if I like baking so much is because I can control everything.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

Marcia's picture

(post #64767, reply #10 of 57)

Chewy cookies are all very well, but it's a matter of fashion. Toll House cookies long ago, were always small and crisp, but chocolate chip cookies seem now to be huge and chewy.

It's good to know that I don't have control issues, since I prefer cooking to baking. You, sir, may have a problem. <G>

Gary's picture

(post #64767, reply #11 of 57)

We'll just have to ask KW if she prefers small and hard versus large and soft : )

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

Marcia's picture

(post #64767, reply #12 of 57)

There must be a worse place than the corner for the likes of you. ;-)

Gary's picture

(post #64767, reply #20 of 57)

What??? I was talking about cookies. What were you thinking about? ;)

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

Marcia's picture

(post #64767, reply #21 of 57)

I thought we were discussing religion; I'm a Millerite, and proud of it. ;-0

Gary's picture

(post #64767, reply #22 of 57)

Millerite is a nickel sulfide mineral, NiS. It is brassy in colour and has an acicular habit, often forming radiating masses and furry aggregates.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millerite

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

MadMom's picture

(post #64767, reply #27 of 57)

I thought a Millerite was someone who only drank Miller beer.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Marcia's picture

(post #64767, reply #28 of 57)

It's also an offshoot of several protestant religions founded in the 1830s or thereabout, wherein a fellow named William Miller predicted the end of the world by using an odd mathematical formula of his own devising, tied to the book of Daniel. He had quite a few followers and the first time the world didn't end was called the Great Disappointment. The second date came and went - the Second Great Disappointment.

Some of the members of the sect decided that there was a Second Coming but it was invisible. I just find the whole thing fascinating.

Miller and his disappointments seem to be the reason that preachers of the apocalypse who came after him leave the date of said happening vague instead of set in stone, so to speak.

Edited to see if I can add a link. Here it is: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millerites


Edited 7/11/2008 10:20 am ET by Marcia

Sondra's picture

(post #64767, reply #13 of 57)

How fast can you make it to the corner??? lol

Marcia's picture

(post #64767, reply #14 of 57)

The corner is far too good for Gary! <G>

MadMom's picture

(post #64767, reply #15 of 57)

Well, I'm glad you think we're too good for somebody!  Actually, Gary is always welcome.  He has a spot right next to Sally.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Marcia's picture

(post #64767, reply #17 of 57)

LOL. All that chocolate and bubbly - you in the corner have it made!

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #64767, reply #19 of 57)

neither of those is my preferred combo. Horny

~RuthAnn
foom!


~RuthAnn

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #64767, reply #6 of 57)

See? Size does matter.

~RuthAnn
foom!


~RuthAnn

Gary's picture

(post #64767, reply #8 of 57)

Why am I not surprised that it is you that breaks the ban on corner-worthy comments? : )

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #64767, reply #18 of 57)

because that's my job here. and I take my job quite seriously.

~RuthAnn
foom!


~RuthAnn

MadMom's picture

(post #64767, reply #9 of 57)

We've missed you in the corner.  Please come over and have some bubbly and chocolates.  You haven't been there in...oh...several minutes.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

BoofyQ's picture

(post #64767, reply #16 of 57)

/enable ON

Did you notice this?

"Corriher ... new book, “BakeWise” (Scribner, $40), due out in October."

Lee's picture

(post #64767, reply #23 of 57)

I heard Shirley Corriher discussing this earlier today on NPR.  She explained it as the result of the liquid in the dough (nothing more than egg and the water content in the butter) having time to moisten the dry ingredients through and through which allows the flavor to develop completely.  She says there is a marked difference in cookies baked immediately upon mixing, 12 hours later, 24 hours later, and 36 hours later.  The flavor is best after 36 hours, but she also said the color of the cookie is darker, the texture is chewier, and if you portion them out with a cookie scoop, they all come out exactly the same size.  I've never heard any of this before and must give it a try. 

butterscotch's picture

(post #64767, reply #24 of 57)

It is absolutely true--and I haven't read the NYT article yet.  Last winter I made a batch of cookie dough (Dorie Greenspan's kurova/world peace cookies).  I baked half the dough right away and put the other half in the refrigerator. The cookies baked in this first batch were ok but not particularly flavorful. I was undecided about whether I'd ever want to make the recipe again.  About 36 hours later, I used some of the refrigerated dough to bake a few more.  Much better flavor! I began to see why the recipe was so popular.  There was still some dough left, so I put it back in the fridge and waited a few more days before baking it.  The final batch of cookies was shockingly better than the first two.  I concluded that, if possible, cookie dough should be aged a few days before baking.

Lee's picture

(post #64767, reply #25 of 57)

Well, you learn something new every day.  I made those World Peace cookies last winter and thought they were good, but not great.  I'll have to try the "aged" version.  I don't know how I'd hide chocolate chip cookie dough from DH for an hour, much less 3 days!

suz's picture

(post #64767, reply #26 of 57)

I've copied the Times recipe as we are fans of Jacques Torres...his store is just a block away!  Can't wait to buy the chocolate disks.


  If I'm understanding this correctly we are putting 'cold' dough in the oven vs 'room temp' hence a difference in baking time....and this method should work on all cookies?

butterscotch's picture

(post #64767, reply #29 of 57)

The freezer is the best hiding place I can think of.  No one ever looks in there except me.


About the world peace cookies--even after all that aging, I share your opinion: good but not great. But much better after a few days of resting the dough.

avak123's picture

(post #64767, reply #45 of 57)

It is so nice to see you back. You have been sorely missed!