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Norwegian crispbreads

AmyElliesMom's picture

I've loved Kavli brand onion crispbread for years, but my supermarket recently stopped carrying it (supposedly the company isn't making it anymore).

So, today I tried my own from the following recipe I ganked from a lovely little British message board:

8oz rye flour
2oz marg or butter
1 teaspoon dried mixed herbs ( don't see why you couldn't vary this)
half a teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons milk or water.

Rub the marg in to the flour and stir in the herbs and salt.
Stir in the water and mix to a firm dough.
Divide the dough in to two halves.
Knead each half lightly on a floured surface.
Roll each half out thinly in to about a 9" square. Thinly is the operative word, or they're rather chewy
Cut in to 3" squares and put on to a lightly greased baking sheet.
Prick each square well to prevent it from rising and bubbling during baking.

Bake at Gas mark 6 (200°c) for 10 to 15 minutes or until the edges just begin to colour, but do not let them brown.
Cool slightly on the baking sheet then transfer to wire racks.

They got really nice and crisp, but they aren't quite like the Kavli. Has anyone made these before? I used almost 3 tablespoons of onion powder, but they were still a bit bland. Any suggestions on how to get more intense flavor? I used onion powder, celery salt and some chili powder.

On a happy note, I made a semi-pastry like recipe and didn't ruin it! This dough is lovely to work with, and I rolled it out on some Press n Seal and that made for easy transferring.


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

TracyK's picture

(post #63458, reply #1 of 17)

Perhaps some diced fresh onion, cooked in a saute pan until a bit browned and most of the liquid has come out? Or minced dehydrated onions (isn't that what they use on onion bagels, etc)?

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63458, reply #2 of 17)

Or, I could use some onion juice as part the liquid and some grated raw sweet onions. And some very minced fresh chives.

Fresh would taste alot better and alot stronger, you are right.

Thank you for the inspiration! Sometimes my head get stuck in gear.


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

KarenP's picture

(post #63458, reply #3 of 17)

 Have you ever tried the oatmeal hardtack in Baking with Julia?  Beatrice Ojakangas, who also is the bwj danish pastry contributor, has done a lot with scandinavian breads and crackers.  I've got her whole grain bread book and will look through that.  In fact, I think I posted some of her cracker recipes at some point..I'll take a look.

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63458, reply #4 of 17)

No, I haven't. I don't (gasp) have Baking with Juila, although it's been on my amazon wishlist for almost two years. No one buys me cookbooks anymore. They think, because they like my cooking, there is nothing more for me to learn.

HA! Double HA! even!!

I've got sooo much I could learn, especially in baking, which is my first love and the bane of my existence.

I'll do a search for the crackers, but my search skills are lacking. Off to the archives!


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #63458, reply #5 of 17)

I'm sure your local library has Baking with Julia.

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63458, reply #8 of 17)

I'm making a trip tomorrow!

(I stopped checking out cookbooks, b/c they kept not getting returned. I felt like such a heel. I didn't MEAN to keep them, but I just "wasn't done" with them yet. Perhaps I'll just photocopy the best recipes?)


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #63458, reply #12 of 17)

Sign up for an Internet pin number with your library.  They'll notify you when your books are due.  You can renew them online, usually twice.  Also, you can place holds on books.  They'll notify you when they come in.  Right now, I have 10 cookbooks checked out and a few more on hold.  I end up buying the ones that I really like.

BTW, a used copy of Baking with Julia can be found for $12.73, which includes shipping) on Amazon.  Addall.com will tell you all the booksellers that sell a particular book and their prices.  It's very convenient.

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63458, reply #13 of 17)

I found the Baking with Julia at Amazon, so I'll be getting that next month, for sure.

And yeah, I do the online renew thing, too. The last cookbook I checked out was a wonderful Greek cookbook and I renewed it twice, and then I wound up with it overdue anyway.

This was before I had internet access at home, so I couldn't just look up stuff like I can now.

But you are right. With amazon, I can get books so cheap, so I really should expand my cookbook collection beyond Joy of Cooking, the American Woman's Cookbook, Craig Clairborne and my mom's old bread cookbook. Well, I do have a few more (including an AWESOME Pennsylvania Dutch cookbook that I've only ever made one recipe from), but I need some more that have good explanations of technique.


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #63458, reply #14 of 17)

I end up buying most of my books from half.com.  Overstock.com also has some very good buys.

Adele's picture

(post #63458, reply #15 of 17)

I've not been too happy with half.com.   Took me three times to get All About Braising.  Also not happy with the China Moon I ordered- claimed to be hardback, but it was the same paperback that I already have.  Emailed the sender twice, no response. 


I like bookcloseouts.com but they don't always have what you want when you want, but they have great deals. (I just ordered 'Food to Die For'- Patricia Cornwell/Kay Scarpetta just for fun with the Martha Stewart one).   I'm liking Jessica's Biscuit. 


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #63458, reply #16 of 17)

I'll have to try bookcloseouts.com.  Sorry to hear you've had so much trouble with half.com.  I've been using them for at least three years and have had very few problems . . . three to be exact, and, on those I received a complete refund from half.com.  Since I can see my entire account history, I know I've ordered almost 100 books from them, I'm embarrased to say!  You take your chances with any of these sites, since you're always dealing with different booksellers.  I should start using my husband's ID, since I've used up my three . . . don't know what to call it . . . claims.

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63458, reply #17 of 17)

half.com is the ebay affiliated one, right?

And I TOTALLY didn't know overstock.com had books. I hate their commercials (ooohhhh...oooooaaaahhhhh), but they've got great deals. I got some 300 thread count sateen cotton sheets, queen size, for $40, once.

I love those sheets.

Anyway (my train of thought has a circular track), I'll have to see if they have some el cheapo cookbooks.


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

Adele's picture

(post #63458, reply #6 of 17)

IIRC, bookcloseouts has Baking with Julia right now, or maybe it was Julia and Jacque Cooking at Home.  One or the other.  Check their scratch & dent.  (Lot of help, eh?)

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63458, reply #10 of 17)

found it at booksagoogle via amazon for $10! Plus $4 shipping. I think we can squeeze that out of the budget. Last time I looked at it, it was a $50 cookbook! How can they cut the price like that? It's not like the techniques aren't valid after a few years or something. Sheesh. I guess they just mark the heck up out of them when the are first published and make their money off the front end.


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

sandermom's picture

(post #63458, reply #11 of 17)

A pasta machine is good for thin crackers.

Klaatu Barada Nikto

KarenP's picture

(post #63458, reply #7 of 17)

Swedish Oatmeal Hardtack
by Beatrice Ojakangas from Baking with Julia


1/4 C solid vegetable shortening
2 Tbsp unsalted butter at room temperature
1/4 cup sugar
1 1/2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
1 cup quick cooking oats
3/4 tsp salt
1/2 tsp baking soda
3/4 cup buttermilk


Mixing the dough:  Put shortening, butter, sugar in a large bowl and blend until smooth and creamy.  In a separate bowl mix the flour, oats, salt and baking soda together.  Add the buttermilk and the dry ingredients into the creamed butter mixture.  It should be somewhat like cookie dough, firm but malleable.

Cover the bowl and let chill for 30 minutes

Center a rack in the oven.  Preheat oven to 325F.  Lightly grease the back of a sheet pan or baking pan.

Shaping the dough:  Divide dough into thirds. Work with one at time, keep remaining in refrigerator covered.  Place the dough in the center of the lightly greased sheet, press down with the heel of your hand to soften it.  Using a rolling pin covered with a pastry sock or rubbed with flour roll the dough into a rectangle as large and thin as possible (to within an inch of the pan edges is ideal).  Dough can be patched if it tears
If you have a hardtack rolling pin use this, if you don't, use the tines of a fork or a docker to prick the dough all over making the holes about 1/4 inch apart for a nice texture.
  Using a pizza wheel, ravioli cutter, or a knife cut the dough in about 2 by 4 inch rectangles but don't move them from the pan, they will separate during baking on their own. 

Baking the crackers:  bake the crackers for 10 - 12 minutes until crisp and golden.  Check them at 7 minutes to make sure they're not baking too fast.  Better to remove them too soon than too late.  Transfer the baking sheet to a cooling rack and within minutes the crackers will shrink and separate.  Remove the
crackers to the rack.  continue on with the rest of the dough.

Once cooled store the crackers in an airtight container at room temperature.  they will keep at least  a week.


Edited 3/13/2005 12:08 am ET by KarenP

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63458, reply #9 of 17)

Thank you for the recipe! Baking soda, huh? So these will rise up a bit? I bet these are more like the thick ones that are soooo good with jam on them. These are on the schedule for next Wednesday, for sure. I'll probably be done with my oniony ones by then.


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.