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No Yeast White Bread

cycler1729's picture

No Yeast White Bread (post #64872)

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I came across this recipe online for a No Yeast White Bread.   Since I am gluten-free I used rice flour mix and added 1 tsp. baking powder for each cup of flour.


It came out looking just like a white bread except that it didn't brown.  It had the right texture and consistency when I cut it and even the next day it wasn't dried out like most yeast/gluten-free breads that I've baked.


It wasn't bad - the only thing is that it had NO flavor - none. 


I'm wondering if that is because there was no sugar in the recipe or if it needed extra salt or something.


I liked that it used water instead of milk because I wanted to keep it parve.


I know that I'd probably be able to add different flavors to it to create a cinnamon-raisin bread but I need the bread itself to be flavorful before I add anything else.


Any thoughts on what this recipe needs?  And what if I used Orange Juice instead of the water?  This really has potential to be the first gluten-free bread that I've ever had that doesn't need to be toasted to be edible!


No Yeast White Bread


2 cups self raising flour


2 eggs


3/4 cup water


1/4 teaspoon salt


2 tablespoons oil


 


Directions


 


1 Beat eggs in oil and add with water to flour and salt


2 Bake at 375F for 40 min in a greased loaf



 


Thanks!


Susan

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

TracyK's picture

(post #64872, reply #1 of 22)

It needs more salt. I'd say at least a full teaspoon.

"Obviously, William Ayers is the most dangerous thing that we as a nation face. He is like a COILED COBRA, wrapped in a WEREWOLF, smothered in AL QAEDA, strapped to the DIRTIEST and most NOO-COO-LARIEST BOMB in the world, poised to kill America and Freedom and Jesus and Apple Pies and the Boston Red Sox."                --Jason Linkins, via Huffington Post

Jean's picture

(post #64872, reply #3 of 22)

I'd add some sugar too. Start with a TBs, or honey.  That might help the browing problem too.



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cycler1729's picture

(post #64872, reply #5 of 22)

Thanks - I thought that, too, about the sugar and the browning but I thought that I'd ask to be sure.

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

TracyK's picture

(post #64872, reply #6 of 22)

Butter instead of oil might also help... the milk proteins will aid browning.

"Obviously, William Ayers is the most dangerous thing that we as a nation face. He is like a COILED COBRA, wrapped in a WEREWOLF, smothered in AL QAEDA, strapped to the DIRTIEST and most NOO-COO-LARIEST BOMB in the world, poised to kill America and Freedom and Jesus and Apple Pies and the Boston Red Sox."                --Jason Linkins, via Huffington Post

beejay's picture

(post #64872, reply #7 of 22)

If you need to avoid gluten you might like the taste of teff flour rather than rice flour.


BJ


Gardening, cooking and woodworking in South'n Murlyn'
Gardening, cooking and woodworking in South'n Murlyn'
cycler1729's picture

(post #64872, reply #8 of 22)

What is teff?  I also heard that sorghum flour tastes a lot closer to wheat but I've been unable to get it where I live.

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

beejay's picture

(post #64872, reply #11 of 22)

Teff is the Ethiopean grain that is used to bake injura.  That's the thin velvety pancake like bread that is served in (actually under) Ethiopean quisine.  I bought some recently in the health food store and have tried to make injura.  NOT successflly.  I need to talk to my Ethiopean neighbor.  I started to say "Google for it" but that sounds too curt.  But Google will tell you lots more about teff than I can.


BJ


Gardening, cooking and woodworking in South'n Murlyn'
Gardening, cooking and woodworking in South'n Murlyn'
Gretchen's picture

(post #64872, reply #12 of 22)

So that is what that is. Thanks.

Gretchen

Gretchen
cycler1729's picture

(post #64872, reply #13 of 22)

So I added the salt and sugar - it looked great but it was inedible - still no flavor but salty. 


I did Google batter breads and most of them use yeast although I came across one for Coconut Bread that looks interesting - no yeast but it does require milk.


This has now become a quest for better than just edible GF no yeast/no milk bread! 


Susan

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

Gretchen's picture

(post #64872, reply #14 of 22)

Well, first you are changing it because of making it gluten free. So maybe this won't be easy.  Look for beer bread and try that, except, I fear that beer has gluten.

Gretchen

Gretchen
cycler1729's picture

(post #64872, reply #15 of 22)

Yes, because of the malt.  There is GF beer but it costs a lot just to use it in a bread.


I've had some success in adapting recipes - especially quick breads and muffins that use fruit - but an ordinary bread is really hard.


 

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

Gretchen's picture

(post #64872, reply #16 of 22)

Why don't you google for gluten free batter bread--or go to a celiac site and look at the breads there. Easier, because, chances are, there is a bread there that someone has already "done'.

Gretchen

Gretchen
cycler1729's picture

(post #64872, reply #17 of 22)

I've used Gluten-Free recipes and they didn't work for me - not the right taste or texture and they all need to be toasted.  I want a bread that I'd be able to eat as is to take along for lunch.


The recipes breads for Gluten-Free bakers use literally about 20 different ingredients, some in tiny amounts to re-create the texture and taste that they are looking for and even then they don't work. 


I realize that what I want is somewhat unrealistic since even the Gluten-Free brand bakeries aren't able to reproduce the real thing but i did manage to work out a recipe for Gluten-Free corn muffins that are unbelievable - the only thing is that they need to be re-heated to get the best flavor but I don't mind that for breakfast.  I'm also stubborn enough to think that if I did that I will be able to create something or just be resigned to eating cake!


I just hope that you don't mind my asking what I'm missing when something is a little "off".


 


 

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

Gretchen's picture

(post #64872, reply #19 of 22)

No asking is great. Have you made yeast bread?  Batter breads are nice and easy but not as good as yeast breads, in my opinion. They aren't hard. Someone (did they do it on this thread) recommended spelt flour.

Gretchen

Gretchen
cycler1729's picture

(post #64872, reply #20 of 22)

I used to bake yeast breads all of the time before my diagnosis - especially my grandmother's challah and coffee cake recipes so I know how much better they are.


I did bake a Gluten-Free (yeast) french bread from a Gluten-Free recipe on another site (possibly I saw it mentioned on this site and linked there) - it did come out ok but it was very yeasty and the next day it was dry and clumpy.  The dough was also closer to a very thick batter than a kneaded dough.


Spelt does contain gluten unfortunately.


I appreciate all of your ideas, though!


 


 


Edited 10/27/2008 11:30 am ET by cycler1729

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

Gretchen's picture

(post #64872, reply #22 of 22)

Then don't bake French bread. It is really only good on the day it is baked whether it is gluten free or not. Just because one wasn't good, doesn't mean they all aren't.  Look for a gluten free bread that has shortening in it. A potato bread is delicious.

Gretchen


Edited 10/27/2008 1:36 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
Syrah's picture

(post #64872, reply #18 of 22)

You could try searching for Damper recipes. You'll still need to work out how to substitute for the flour, but I think you'll find something that works.

Maybe this

http://members.optusnet.com.au/~failsafe/bread01.html#Gluten%20Free%20Damper

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"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

cycler1729's picture

(post #64872, reply #21 of 22)

Thanks - I'll check those out.

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

cycler1729's picture

(post #64872, reply #9 of 22)

Will that change the texture?

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

TracyK's picture

(post #64872, reply #10 of 22)

Probably not noticably. You could use half and half if you're concerned, though!

"Obviously, William Ayers is the most dangerous thing that we as a nation face. He is like a COILED COBRA, wrapped in a WEREWOLF, smothered in AL QAEDA, strapped to the DIRTIEST and most NOO-COO-LARIEST BOMB in the world, poised to kill America and Freedom and Jesus and Apple Pies and the Boston Red Sox."                --Jason Linkins, via Huffington Post

Gretchen's picture

(post #64872, reply #2 of 22)

This is a batter bread. Agree with Tracy--more salt. If you do a search for beer bread, you'll find a similar recipe to this that was always a lot of fun to whip up.


You can probably google for "batter bread" and find a lot of variations too.


Gretchen
Gretchen
cycler1729's picture

(post #64872, reply #4 of 22)

Thanks - I'll do that.  I didn't realize that was another way of searching - I was looking for Quick Breads.  It really is so easy.

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin