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New non-transfat shortening

whatscooking's picture

I used this product instead of regular crisco the other day with my standard recipe for pie crust .  The recipe uses 1/2 butter, 1/2 shortening.  The crust came out really soft.  It  browned, but it was just sort of mushy on the top.  Weird.


I used IQF cherries, so I wonder if it could have been just too much liquid from those.


Has anyone else tried this product yet?

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Syb's picture

(post #63471, reply #1 of 10)

I haven't tried a Crisco substitute, but I used some non-trans fat margerine to make one batch of cookies at Christmas time.  I would ordinarily have used butter.  The result was disappointing.  I was so hoping I wouldn't notice a difference, but both the taste and texture suffered.  I wouldn't use the margerine again for baking unless it was for someone like my DM, who ordinarily uses margerine anyway, and needs to avoid butter for health reasons.

Glenys's picture

(post #63471, reply #2 of 10)

I'm not a faux-food person but I don't believe in baking that any margarine substituted for butter is going to going to yield the same product, hydrogenated or not. Margarine is whipped; butter is "churned". Neither is based on the same type of fat so the melt will be completely different. It may not change a sauté but baking is a completely different science.

Syb's picture

(post #63471, reply #3 of 10)

ITA.

Lexi's picture

(post #63471, reply #4 of 10)

You're quite right.  I had a great aunt who always substituted margarine for butter and saccharine for sugar.  Poor dear; all that work and expense for naught.  I hated to throw out the cookies and breads she would bring (or send when we lived in other parts of the country), but they were simply awful.  I still feel guilty about it.

 

 

whatscooking's picture

(post #63471, reply #5 of 10)

I agree not to substitute marjarine for butter in cookies.  Cookies are all about butter.  But I do like my pie crust with both shortening and butter.  For me, it makes it a little easier to work with and gives a flaky result.


But I'll stick with regular crisco instead of the "with not transfats" variety.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Lexi's picture

(post #63471, reply #6 of 10)

Shortening in pie crust is another issue.  IMO, the flakiest crusts are made with leaf lard, although I don't know anyone who still uses it.  I think an all-butter crust has the best flavor, but adding shortening does make for a slightly flakier crust, and it's easier to work with.  I add shortening when I make a double crust fruit pie or a single-crust pie when I don't use crumbs.  It gives that All American flavor and texture that I grew up with.  I use all butter for tarts and galettes.

 

 

Glenys's picture

(post #63471, reply #7 of 10)

Me too, I'm vote lard for savoury crusts when desired and all butter the rest of the time. I thought there was a good article on the perfect pie crust (as in good old fashioned apple pies etc) in Saveur a while back. The combination of lard and butter did everything that keeps people holding on the wonder-of-science Crisco.

Debby's picture

(post #63471, reply #10 of 10)

As I started reading thru these posts I began to wonder about using the lard/butter combo--and here is your post mentioning the very same.  Guess it would be a one to one ratio...?


Debby

Glenys's picture

(post #63471, reply #8 of 10)

It's worth the time, a little observation and perhaps using the food processor if you like, but butter crusts are just as easy and ultimately more useful and satisfying. Don't be afraid, you're half way there anyway!

whatscooking's picture

(post #63471, reply #9 of 10)

You are right;  I should try it again.  I've made many, many pies since the last time I tried to use all butter.  Maybe now it won't seem as difficult to work with. 

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/