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A new method for baking cakes

CookiM0nster's picture

A while back I posted a recipe for an exceptionally moist chocolate butter cake that included an unusual baking method - very low heat, followed by wrapping the cake immediately out of the oven to let it steam itself cool.

Out of curiosity, I decided to try it on a regular butter cake to see what happened. It works really well. I used my favorite yellow cake (RLB's from the Cake Bible), and baked it in two 9-inch round pans at 300 for 40 minutes, then covered the pans with parchment and foil immediately afte taking them out of the oven and left them until they were completely cool. The result? An exceptionally moist, tender cake Not soggy, or wet, just nice and moist. The crumb is finer than when baking at a higher heat, and has a nice, velvety texture.

Next I think I'll try the method on the classic 1-2-3-4 cake.

Meryl's picture

(post #63438, reply #1 of 12)

Thanks, CM! Will have to try this method out. BTW, can you link me to the Chocolate Butter Cake recipe you posted? (You knew that one was coming, didn't you?  ;-) 



Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Jean's picture

(post #63438, reply #2 of 12)

Here you go Meryl. I'm pretty sure this is the one. It has the same method anyway.


http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=18737.1


Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Meryl's picture

(post #63438, reply #3 of 12)

Jean, you're amazing. I looked in Search and couldn't find it. Thanks!!!


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63438, reply #4 of 12)

Yup, that's it. Jean you're the best.

Jean's picture

(post #63438, reply #5 of 12)

It helps to know who posted it. :)

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
butterscotch's picture

(post #63438, reply #6 of 12)

CM--Is parchment essential?  Could wax paper be used instead?

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63438, reply #7 of 12)

Sure. You could even just use the foil alone.

Adele's picture

(post #63438, reply #8 of 12)

See, now I thought wax paper wasn't good for things that are hot.  I always thought it melted in some way.   Don't know why I think this, just always have. 

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63438, reply #9 of 12)

Well, I wouldn't put it in the oven, but I don't think a cake would be too hot for it.

DeannaS's picture

(post #63438, reply #12 of 12)

Hm...my wax paper box says, "for all your baking needs."

That being said, it's a pale substitute for parchment when it comes to baking. When I made bao and I realized that I was out of parchment (okay, there was a 2 inch scrap in the box), I resorted to wax paper....it did not please me.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

TracyK's picture

(post #63438, reply #10 of 12)

I nearly always use it atop racks when cooling cookies. Keeps delicate or still-melty cookies from falling through the cracks.


You say I'm a b---- like that's a bad thing.

Adele's picture

(post #63438, reply #11 of 12)

Hmmmm.  Could of used that last night for the Mocha cookies.  Good tip.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!