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Madeleines from Dessert University

Ballottine's picture

Here is the madeleines recipe I promised you, sorry it took me so long.  I bought a scanner, but can't get it to work, so I had to retype it. Bal


 


MADELEINES


From  DESSERT UNIVERSITY


By Roland Mesnier


 


 from his notes:


Perfect madeleines should have a nice hump on the top, indicating a good rise and a resulting lightness in texture.  The thinner edges should be golden brown, caramelized and crunchy.  Don’t overwhip the butter, or the air bubbles you whip in will deflate during baking and you will lose the rise.  I’ve found that letting the batter rest overnight in the refrigerator also contributes to a full rise.RM


FOR THE MADELEINE DOUGH 


1 1/2 cups plus 2 T AP flour


2 1/4 t baking powder


1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened


I cup granulated sugar


1 teaspoon grated lemon zest


Pinch salt


4 large eggs


1 large egg yolk


 FOR THE LEMON OR GRAPEFRUIT GLAZE opt.


For the lemon glaze (optional): ¾ cup confectioner’s sugar


2 T strained fresh lemon juice


1 t grated lemon zest


 


(or use  grapefruit juice and zest)


 



  1. Place the flour and baking powder into a medium bowl and whisk to combine.

 



  1. Combine the butter, sugar, lemon zest, and salt in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, and mix until smooth.  Be careful not to overbeat.  With the mixer on low speed, add the eggs and then yolk, one at a time, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary, and mix until well-combined.  Stir in the flour mixture and mix until the dough is smooth, 1 minute.  Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour or up to 3 days.  The dough will keep in an airtight container, or portioned out in zipperlock bags, in the freezer for up to 1 month.

 



  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.  Make the lemon glaze: combine the confectioners’ sugar, lemon juice, and lemon zest in a medium bowl and whisk to dissolve the sugar

 



  1. Butter the madeleine or muffin pans and flour them (if you are using nonstick pans, there is no need to butter or flour them). Spoon the batter into the pans until each cup is about ¾ full.  Bake until risen and golden, about 8 minutes.  Remove the pans from the oven, immediately turn the madeleines out of the pans, and brush them with lemon glaze if desired.  Madeleines are best eaten on the day they are baked.

  2. (or , on the third day dip them  in your milk or coffee ala Proust. Bal) 

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Ballottine's picture

(post #63408, reply #1 of 12)

Mean chef and all bakers, please help.


I've just posted my madeleine recipe, which by the way, according to RM, can be baked in muffin tins.


I decided to master the proverbial "perfect madeleines."    I want to learn to make something as simple as madeleines perfectly.


1.  I ordered on Amazon two sheets of black, but not nonstick,  regular size madeleine pans(12 to a sheet)  and two small (24 to a sheet) rubber ones.


This is what I discovered:  the rubber ones are easier to unmold and they don't need to be buttered and floured, but madeleines come out very pale.  If I bake them to a desired light golden color, they come out too dry.  Should have not  bothered to buy the small size pans, all I need to do is to  put less batter into the large sized madeleine pans and  results are much better. 


2.  I tried  several recipes and the Dessert University madeleines  had the best texture.  Making the batter the night before helps a lot, but when using the same batter after two nights in the refrigerator  - lemon or orange ( I tried that too) taste was gone.


3. Even though I used a scoop to put batter into the madeleine pans not all cookies came out looking alike.  I want them to be like a string of perfect pearls, all the same  size, color, shine and texture, but some of them seem to have holes, some holes are as large as 1/8 or 1/4 of a teaspoon.  I presume that's the butter pieces.  MR warns not to overbeat butter.  Any ADVICE on how to get rid of those holes will be appreciated. 


4.  I discovered that the best way to bake madeleines in my oven is to preheat it to 425, lower to 350 as soon as madeleines go in, bake for12-15 minutes on the middle rack.  Keep the oven door ajar with a wooden spon for the last 8-10 minutes.  


PS: My family is "on strike."     At first they were devouring the madeleines as they were coming out of the oven, even before the glaze went on.  Today I was very nicely asked to bake something else, and my madeleines still need perfecting.  Ouch.  Bal


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #63408, reply #2 of 12)

I am not an expert on madeleines.  they always stick to the pan.  They taste great, but for me are a ****** to make right.  You should not have chunks of butter ijn the batter , however.

Ballottine's picture

(post #63408, reply #3 of 12)

Thanks for your quick response.

they always stick to the pan.  They taste great, but for me are a ****** to make right. 


I agree, perhaps, that is why I want to master them.  Simple cakes should be made simply.


You should not have chunks of butter in the batter , however.


Agree  again. I was just following the instructions to the letter.  Now, Nancy Silverton uses melted butterin her madelein recipe.  I am going to try that next.  Her recipes come out perfect, but she has sooo many extra steps.  I am not making a wedding cake,  just little breakfast cakes. Bal

 

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #63408, reply #4 of 12)

I always use melted, cooled, unsalted butter. I am so NOT a baker, but I do make madeleines and financiers more frequently than any other baked goods, maybe twice a month. When they are done, it is very key to remove them from the molds immediately and allow them to cool on a rack.


My favorite recipe is from Patricia Wells and it is published in either Food Lovers Guide to France or Food Lovers Guide to Paris, not sure which. I don't have either book here nor do I have any baking recipes with me (since I don't have an oven in the Paris apt) so I cannot post it. The only variation from her recipe is that I refrigerate the batter overnight instead of just for an hour.


Perhaps someone who has those books could take a peek if you want the recipe.


Edited to say I use traditional metal madeleine plaques. Mine are very old, I bought them at a flea market here, years ago. I use the silpat molds for financiers, however.



I was 32 when I started cooking; up until then, I just ate
Julia Child


Edited 1/22/2005 7:34 pm ET by RISOTTOGIRL

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

schnitzel's picture

(post #63408, reply #5 of 12)

LEMON TEA CAKES (Madeleines)


Amy
Cooks Talk T&T Recipes
"The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude."  Julia Child

Ballottine's picture

(post #63408, reply #8 of 12)

Wow, you are fast!  Thank you.   I went to your T& T first.  I must explore them tomorrow.  Please forgive me,  it is past  my bed time, I will continue tomorrow. 


I did not know you were the Amy.  I printed a lot of early recipes including the Mean Chef ones posted in T&T by Amy.  Thank you for doing that.


 Bal


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

schnitzel's picture

(post #63408, reply #12 of 12)

Yup, I used to post as Amy W. ;·)


You may notice there are a few more recipes in my collection at RecipeCircus that aren't in the T&T recipe folder here, but all the recipes are ones that a few people tried and liked a lot. For instance, the Orange Butter Cake that Meryl posted. . .


Amy W
Cooks Talk T&T Recipes
"The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude."  Julia Child

Ballottine's picture

(post #63408, reply #6 of 12)

Thank you so much.  I love Patricia Well's recipes,  they always come out well.  I have both  of the books you mention.  I am going to take a look  at them  immediately.  Thank you again.  We are snowed in, not  much to do except bake. I shall report.  Bal

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

RuthWells's picture

(post #63408, reply #7 of 12)

Bal, I'm with RisottoGirl -- the recipe should call for melted butter (actually clarified, or even beurre noisette), not creamed.  If I remember correctly, a proper madeleine recipe is very close to traditional French biscuit (imagine this with a French accent). 


I have had some success with Madeleines in the past, using a traditional (shiny) metal plaque for the molds, and using Bakers' Joy (a combination shortening/flour spray) to liberally coat the interiors of the molds.  I have found that it helps to fill the molds only to about 1/4 inch from the top, not all the way to the top, and to place the plaques on cookie sheets or baking sheets for ease of handling.


If you are interested in trying a variety of recipes, let me know -- I can probably scrounge up 6 or 7!


 



Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw


Edited 1/22/2005 8:44 pm ET by RUTHWELLS

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Ballottine's picture

(post #63408, reply #9 of 12)

Oh yes, I am.  Thank you.  I especially would like to know how you rate each recipe. I tried  quite a few of them already, but the DU ones came better than others.  I will definitely use melted butter in my next attempt.  Bal

 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

RuthWells's picture

(post #63408, reply #10 of 12)

LOL, I can't claim to have TRIED all 6-7 recipes, hee hee!  But I'll dig a few out to post in the morning.  Almost bedtime, here.


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

sandermom's picture

(post #63408, reply #11 of 12)

Thanks for posting the maddening recipe.  School starts monday so I'll give it a whirl. 

Klaatu Barada Nikto