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A Layer of Gumminess

cycler1729's picture

A Layer of Gumminess (post #64885)

in

What causes there to be a layer of gumminess in the bottom of a cake?  Too much liquid or beating? 


It's been a ling time since I had this happen but it happened in an otherwise yummy marble cake last week.

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #64885, reply #1 of 25)

Gumminess at the bottom is something I associate with a cake that has fallen - either it was taken out of the oven too soon, or had the oven door open too long part way through baking, or was bumped while baking.

cycler1729's picture

(post #64885, reply #4 of 25)

Probably all of those!  It was a lot higher at one end of the pan so I turned that end back into the oven so that might be what happened.


 

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

JillElise's picture

(post #64885, reply #2 of 25)

Could it be that you don't take it out of the pan soon enough? It needs to breath, and maybe if you take it out of the pan as soon as you can handle it - maybe five minutes - and put it on a cooling rack, it might help. Unless of course you already do that, in which case, I have no idea!

cycler1729's picture

(post #64885, reply #3 of 25)

I didn't take it out of the pan because I thought that it was going to come apart.  I will take it out next time.

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #64885, reply #5 of 25)

I don't think leaving it in the pan is the problem. I've done that many times without any gumminess.

Gretchen's picture

(post #64885, reply #6 of 25)

Maybe just not being done enough.


Gretchen
Gretchen
JillElise's picture

(post #64885, reply #11 of 25)

Because I am so often doing a zillion things at once, I have on more than one occasion left a cake in a pan, and have it gummy on the bottom, but it does sound like it could be so many things. One thing not lacking here at CT is opinions!

ashleyd's picture

(post #64885, reply #7 of 25)

Just goes to prove gumminess is next to yumminess.


Exit (rapidly) stage left.



Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

cycler1729's picture

(post #64885, reply #8 of 25)

Get thee to a punnery!

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

Astrid's picture

(post #64885, reply #9 of 25)

It seems to me that gumminess on the bottom could indicate not enough heat to get the mixture to rise completely. Was the pan in the middle of the oven? Was the oven temp. hot enough? Was your leavening fresh?

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
cycler1729's picture

(post #64885, reply #10 of 25)

Yes, everything was the way it was supposed to be but I think that the recipe needed a little higher temperature.  I baked another today in a different pan and it wasn't baked through after the time they gave.

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

Astrid's picture

(post #64885, reply #12 of 25)

So, did you bake it longer? I like to use the little thin metal skewers found in the baking dept. to test the done-ness of cakes, to see if it is baked at the bottom and middle. If the skewer comes out clean then I know for sure the cake is baked enough.
I wonder about your oven temp. too, do you use an oven thermometer, one that sits in the oven? The temp registering in your oven may not be accurate.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
cycler1729's picture

(post #64885, reply #13 of 25)

I did but the inside still wasn't done.  I was thinking the same thing about my oven except that I baked muffins and they were perfect - the only thing that I seem to be able to bake. 

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

Astrid's picture

(post #64885, reply #14 of 25)

Muffins are smaller than a cake- and therefore will bake up more quickly. I'm almost totally positive you have a problem with heating your oven to the correct temperature for what you are baking, when it comes to cakes, bread, etc.
The temperature setting of your oven may be inaccurate, the mechanism can age after a while, but you can fix that by buying a small oven thermometer which you put in the oven, watch that and go by the temperature given in your recipes. You should get better results.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

Edited 11/3/2008 6:55 pm by Astrid


Edited 11/3/2008 6:56 pm by Astrid

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
JillElise's picture

(post #64885, reply #15 of 25)

Could it help if you preheated the oven longer?

Astrid's picture

(post #64885, reply #16 of 25)

I hope you have decided to take a break from baking and are having a nice day! Too much cake is not good all at once. :-)

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
cycler1729's picture

(post #64885, reply #18 of 25)

Yes, I only bake one day a week.  So much work but when it comes out right there's nothing better.


 

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

cycler1729's picture

(post #64885, reply #17 of 25)

It is preheated because I was also cooking something at the same time which was at the same temperature and I put that in a while before the cake was prepared.

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

JillElise's picture

(post #64885, reply #19 of 25)

Mystery! Good luck figuring it out.

delice's picture

(post #64885, reply #20 of 25)

I have had this problem and had seen it in cakes my grandmother made many years ago.  She called it "sad cake" but gave no explanation for it.  Her cakes were always good and this rarely happened when she baked.  It has occurred several times and I have researched it.  I found only one mention of it in a cooking mag several years ago that said it is the result of poor or faulty of uptake of flour by the butter.  The source did not state if it is a problem with the recipe or just the reaction of the products.


I have tried baking cakes long past when they are done(edges dry and pulled way away from pan, tested done with skewer, top very brown)and have still had this problem.   It seems like this has happened in Bundt or tube pans for me, can't remember--it has been too long.  Please post if you find an answer.

Gretchen's picture

(post #64885, reply #21 of 25)

Yup, sad pound cakes do "happen". It is the will of the gods!  They can be resurrected with boiled custard, etc.!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
Astrid's picture

(post #64885, reply #22 of 25)

I wonder if it is because of high pressure weather in the area, at times. Can't prove it though. There are good baking days, and bad baking days. Also the humidity.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
cycler1729's picture

(post #64885, reply #24 of 25)

I'll accept any excuse but it's probably just that I'm not a great baker!  LOL

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

Astrid's picture

(post #64885, reply #25 of 25)

:-)

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
Astrid's picture

(post #64885, reply #23 of 25)

I made up a lovely big batch of a pumpkin cake recipe, which I took out of the oven too soon. The 5 little breads fell deeply in the middle, so now I'm having pumpkin cake with hot milk, pumpkin cake with nuts and raisins, pumpkin cake with bananas, pumpkin cake with anything. The gooey parts I tossed.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson