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Lavash crackers.....

SallyBR1's picture

Lavash crackers..... (post #65188)

in

Just made these....

one word: SPECTACULAR

Reinhart hit the jackpot with this one for sure!

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

roz's picture

(post #65188, reply #1 of 10)

No, I think you hit the jackpot! Beautiful! BTW, Reinhart has a new book coming out at the end of October......

Peter Reinhart's Artisan Breads Every Day (Hardcover)

I tried to tinyurl the book, but could not for some reason. Should be a fun book! I am having a great time with Daniel Leader's book....not so much fun with Hammelman's.

Leader uses metric measures for the home use, Hammelman does not. I hate thinking in ounces and pounds. If I wanted to make 22 loaves, now Hammelman would be good!

I love the buckwheat bread from Leader...the smell is divine!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
SallyBR1's picture

(post #65188, reply #2 of 10)

Dear darling... I already pre-ordered the book, thanks to Gary twisting my arm so hard it is still bruised.

That man is dangerous.

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

SallyBR1's picture

(post #65188, reply #3 of 10)

Amazing! I LOVE LOVE LOVE Hammelman's book. Three of his breads are in my more or less permanent rotation, because they always turn out great

Leader's book, I made two breads from it, but it did not turn out as good as I expected. I remember that the buckwheat called my attention when I first read the recipe. Maybe I should give it a try

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

roz's picture

(post #65188, reply #4 of 10)

I was looking forward to Hammelman's book....I am lazy....I don't want to re-calculate the recipes into metric....plus I always change the recipe a bit as I use my own fresh ground whole wheat, which weighs in differently than commercial milled whole wheat flour or bread flour. And my levain is part rye and whole wheat....and very wet!

I will pre-order, too. Can't NOT order the book!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
courgette's picture

(post #65188, reply #5 of 10)

I picked up Leader's book at the library as I have been thinking about starting some "starter"and it jumped off the shelf into my arms! I also have Rose's book and Peter's, but haven't used them. I have made bread since I was a child but just the yeast type, none of this starter stuff except for a sponge sometimes.


Anyway, I made the Everyday Parisian Baguettes yesterday. They turned out pretty well, but they are not baguettes. They are larger than they should be and soft and nice, but def not baguettes.


I was looking at the last one (it makes 3) as I was making sand this am and wondered where the slashes were. They are on the bottom! I used the baking stone in my Gaggenau and it doesn't really pull out so when I went to put them in the oven they tumbled everywhere! I must say they are resiliant as I just picked them up and threw them in the oven...and the slashes ended up on the bottom!


I did buy rye flour, organic and stoneground. Which starter do you use and do you just keep one? Or several?


See, you are the bread expert around here now!


Mo

roz's picture

(post #65188, reply #6 of 10)

Not Sally but I like Leader's latest book Local Breads. Sally would probably faint, but I don't follow the recipes to the Tee...

I have a home grinder and grind my own wheat and rye. I keep a wet starter (125%) on my counter and feed it twice a day unless I am not going to make bread for a long time. Then it goes into the fridge to sleep. My starter is fed 175 g water, 30 g rye flour and 110 g whole wheat. Already my starter is not what is in the recipe. Works perfectly every time.

You do not need to keep a different starter for rye, wheat, spelt, etc. Just take out the tablespoon or two that is needed of the levain, add the correct amount of water for the hydration and the flour that you want the starter to become and keep feeding for a few days and you will have a rye starter or a buckwheat starter. Go to http://www.wildyeastblog.com/ and look around this site. I want to make bread like this as easily as Susan does it!

I made Pierre Nury's Rustic Light Rye this weekend. The dough is really wet and turned out great. I recommend that recipe as it is really easy.

I also made the Miche, the Buckwheat Batard (fabulous smell and taste) Genzano Country Bread and next up is Auverge Rye Baguette with Bacon.

Good luck and I know Sally will have better instructions.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
courgette's picture

(post #65188, reply #7 of 10)

This all sounds very complicated but I'm sure once you get onto it, it's no big deal! I started the poolish for the ganatard flute from Local Breads this am as it sounds very simple.


The last "baguette" from yesterday made great sandsiches this am so it may be one I will use often anyway. The dough was very nice and easy to shape and didn't really mind when I picked it up and threw it on the oven! LOL!


I have been thinking about this bread thing for a while and picked up several lames on sale at WS for almost nothing a while ago because Madmom was talking about them. I had never heard tell of them before and had just used a knife or scissors. Have this lovely oven so it seems a shame not to use it. It is a bit of a pain to put the stone in and out so I think I will just leave it in as it is the second oven. Wanted one all my adult life and only got it after 2 of the kids left and I don't cook nearly the amount I used to.


thanks for the info.


Mo

roz's picture

(post #65188, reply #8 of 10)

My biggest problem with bread is the slashing! I've started to use a very sharp Japanese knife and it seems to work in the cutting area. I either don't cut deep enough or too deep. Never perfect! I suppose one has to make hundreds of loaves to perfect any aspect of bread making, to get it all right. It's fun and satisfies my baking need and the need to share.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
SallyBR1's picture

(post #65188, reply #9 of 10)

Hello there... sorry for the delay in answering

I have two starters going on a regular basis, and if I need to "transform" one into a rye starter, I just start feeding it three days before with rye flour. I don't see myself keeping more than two, not for the work (which is nothing really), but space in the fridge... :-)

slashing is the trickiest part indeed, I got a baker's blade. For some breads, like hearty sourdoughs, sometimes a very shallow cut does the job. For baguettes, you need to go a little deeper. Not that I have consistent results, but I feel that you need to be assertive, plan your cut as you look at the bread, hold the blade and GO FOR IT. Once. No turning back, no moving the blade around, make it count :-)

Even though I feel that my shaping into "boules" is more or less optimized, I have a very long ways to go with baguettes. It is the toughest bread to master.

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

courgette's picture

(post #65188, reply #10 of 10)

I baked the ganatard flutes yesterday and they were also a very "light" bread. Good, but quite airy. Nothing else started yet, not even the started. Better get on that today.


Mo