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Kuchen

BillHartmann's picture

Kuchen (post #64901)

in

The problem with the name kuchen is that just means cake in German. But what I am talking about is a yeast based dough that is put in a cake pan and the filled with a custard filling.

I know that this was common in Louisville and I think Cincinnati, but when I have ask around other places I never found any one that heard of them.

I see that Heitzman's still makes them and sells them through the Louisville area Krogers.

http://www.heitzmanbakery.net/index.html

And in the past when I googled kuchen I kept coming up with other cakes.

But this time I did find several other versions.

But I also have my mothers recipes and one in BH&G cookbook.

Now you have understand my mothers recipes. I have one for sprinerglies that says to beat the eggs for 30 minutes or until thick. When asked about that she said that is the way that she got it and was for a hand mixer. And one for German potato salad that says to use 9 MEDIUM potatoes. But when you watch her count out the potatoes you realize that the "medium" potatoes are actually small new potatoes. A typical potato will count as about 3.

I tried this a number of years ago and don't remember how it came out, but I remember working with the yeast dough was a pain. One thing that I remember was when I tried rolling out the dough that it kept snapping back.

Ok here is mothers recipe for the dough.

2 3/4 - 3 1/4 C flour
2 Tbl sugar
1/2 t salt
1/2 t nutmeg
1 pk yeast
1 cup milk
1/3 C oil
1 egg

Combine 1 C flour, sugar, salt, nutmeg, and yeast.

Heat milk & oil until very warm. Add warm liquid and egg to flour. Blend at low speed until moistened then beat 2 min on medium.

By hand stir in 1 1/2 cup flour to form stiff dough. On floured surface knead in 1/4 to 3/4 C flour until smooth & elastic - 5 to 7 minutes.

Place dought in greased blowl and cover loosely with plastic and towle. Let rise until double about 1 hour. Divide into 4 parts. Roll into 10" circules and place in greased pans (8"). Dough to within 1/2" of the top. Prick generously with a fork. Cover & let rise 30 min.

Put in filling and bake at 350 for 35-45 minutes.

First question this just says to use "yeast", some of the similar recipes say to use active dry yeast. But most don't proof the yeast, which I though was needed with dry yeast. And from reading instant yeast is "relatively" new and this recipe is at least 30 years old and probably much more.

Most of the other recipes use more eggs and less milk.

Here is the BH&G

3 C flour
1 package actice dry yeast
3/4 C milk
6 Tbs butter
1/3 C sugar
1/2 t salt
2 eggs

Combine 1 1/2 c flour. Heat milk, butter, sugar and salt until warm (115-120) an butter almost melted.

Add to flour. add eggs and beat on low for 1/2 minute.

Beat on high for 3 minutes. Add in remaining flour.

Divide in 1/2 and pat into two 9" pans pressing up side to form rim. then cover and let stand 45 minutes to rise.

Now the main difference that I see this one does does not call for rising and rolling it out first. And then patting it out. I wonder if that would be a little easier than rolling out the dough after it rises. That is what I remember that I had problems with, rolling it.

Also This calls for 2 9" pans, while the first is 4 8" pans, but they should be about the same amount of dough. Does that sound right.

One of the other recipes called for letting the dough rise overnight. Then rolling it out and making the kucken without the 2nd rise. I would think that would end up very dense.

. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
CookiM0nster's picture

(post #64901, reply #1 of 44)

I'll try to help with a few of your questions.

You don' need to proof the yeast, and you can substitute instant if you want without any problem.

The double rising will improve the flavor of the cake. An overnight rise in the refrigerator should improve it even more. When it comes to yeast-doughs a long, slow rise is ideal for maximum flavor development.

If you're having trouble getting it to roll out without snapping back let it rest on the counter for 10 minutes to give the gluten in the dough a chance to relax. That should make it easier.

Maedl's picture

(post #64901, reply #2 of 44)

I'm not familiar with the cake you're talking about, but it sounds something like a Bienenstich--have a look at this link and see if it's similar.

http://www.dianasdesserts.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/recipes.recipeListingPrintOnly/filter/dianas/recipeID/474/Recipe.cfm

As for your recipes, I think I'd stick with the first recipe--it sounds more reasonable than the second. I would be suspicious about the absence of kneading in the second--that would severely affect the texture, I'd think. (I wonder if the directions were at some point mis-written.) When you are making a coffee cake, you want a tender, fine texture. In the first recipe, I would substitute butter for the oil though. Instant dry yeast should be fine, and it doesn't require proofing, although if you feel better about it, you can proof just to reassure yourself. The yeast that comes in small blocks contains the same amount as the dried yeast that comes in the packets--it just hasn't been dried and that's why the volume is greater. That's the yeast that needs to be proofed. I like the fresh yeast, but it doesn't have much of a shelf life and needs to be refrigerated.

When you turn the dough on to a board and add the flour as you knead, you should notice a change in stickiness and that's your signal that you've added enough flour. Just put the flour on your board, flour the area where you will knead the dough, and when the dough begins to stick, through more flour on the board and knead more. When the dough doesn't stick to the board and develops a smooth, elastic, satiny texture, you have kneaded enough.

Old recipes (and by this I mean 19th Century and earlier--30 years is not old!) are notoriously vague. Women generally had plenty of experience in the kitchen and knew what to look for as they prepared food. Measurements weren't standardized, so "a knob of butter the size of a walnut" was a practical way to describe the quantity needed. I come from a long line of springerle makers and I can tell you that the instructions to beat the eggs for 30 minutes, even if you are using a mixer, is absolutely correct. The eggs must be very, very thick and a light, delicate color. I remember my grandmother telling me about springerle baking and saying that she and my mother used to beat the eggs by hand almost the entire morning. The reason so many people turn their noses up at springerle is that there are so many bad versions of them floating around! In the first week or so after baking, springerle should have a chewy texture. Then they begin to crisp up--but they shouldn't be rock hard.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
CookiM0nster's picture

(post #64901, reply #3 of 44)

My first thought was Bienenstich too, but this one has the custard baked in.

Maedl's picture

(post #64901, reply #4 of 44)

I wonder what the texture of the custard is like--it must be pretty firm. Are you familiar with the deep butter cake as is baked in St. Louis? Perhaps it's a permutation of that?

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
gourmand's picture

(post #64901, reply #5 of 44)

A friend brought one of these down to the lake. Wonderful.


http://www.mcarthurs.com/christmas.asp


 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

Maedl's picture

(post #64901, reply #10 of 44)

My gosh, a St. Louis bakery that I don't remember! How did I miss that, particularly since we lived next to Kirkwood. Perhaps they didn't move there until after I had left. But yes, that's the deep butter cake--and they're delicious, one of those foods you only find in St. Louis. Do you remember Lake Forest Pastry shop? It was on Clayton Road. That was one of my favorites, along with the Missouri Bakery and Amighetti's on the Hill and another bakery, which I think was on Chippewa Street in South St. Louis. Missouri Bakery and Amighetti's were our weekday bakery, because my father worked near by; Lake Forest was the "anytime" bakery, whenever we had to go to Clayton, and the one on Chippewa was our Saturday bakery, the one we'd stop by on the way home from Soulard Market. No wonder I grew into such a food-oriented person!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
gourmand's picture

(post #64901, reply #11 of 44)

I live at Lake Of the Ozarks, 2 1/2 hours from St Louis. I have many full and part time friends here at the lake. I have never been to St. Louis but have heard many, many stories from friends. One of my best friends is Italian and was raised much like you, fresh bread every meal. We are going up there some time when they go back to St Louis. Can't wait to visit "the hill". He has talked about Lake Forest several times. Unfortunately it was sold in 2002 and closed a couple of years later.

 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

Maedl's picture

(post #64901, reply #12 of 44)

I think you will love the Hill! And if by some stroke of luck, St. Ambrose is holding some sort of Italian dinner to raise money, go to that--it won't be fancy, but it will be the Hill, with every politician plying the crowd looking for votes in the next election! Plus, there are so many other good restaurants in St. Louis--and if you get a chance to go to Soulard Market, you'd enjoy that as well. I think it's the oldest outdoor market west of the Mississippi. I remember the day Lake Forest Bakery closed--a sad day in the history of the city!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
CookiM0nster's picture

(post #64901, reply #6 of 44)

No, I don't know that one.

BillHartmann's picture

(post #64901, reply #13 of 44)

Margie

That Bienenstich cake seems to be fancy version of the kuchen that I am familiar with. Mine is probably more of a country farm version.

But I see this which CM also mentioned.

"Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled work surface, fold it over to expel any excess gas, then divide it in half. Roll each piece into a ball, then pat and stretch each ball into an 8-inch circle. Place the circles into two lightly greased 8-inch cake pans; don’t worry if the dough shrinks away from the edges of the pans. Allow it to rise/rest for 30 minutes-the gluten will relax, making the dough easier to work with-then gently stretch and pat it to reach the edge. Make the topping while the dough is rising."

So that is probably the "trick" that I need.

About springerlies I have had not any problems with just beating them about 3-5 minutes with the mixer.

But they are certainly something that I would never have figured out from just a recipe. My stepfather showed me how to make the first batch. Without that I would probably never have gotten enough flour in them and had a real sticky mess when trying to roll them out.

. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
Maedl's picture

(post #64901, reply #14 of 44)

I'm surprised that you get good results on the springerle with only 3-5 minutes of beating--that's interesting. What do you use for leavening? Baking powder or baking ammonia? The recipe I use is old and calls for baking ammonia, although I can't imagine that has anything to do with the eggs.

I don't have a standing mixer, so I rig up a sling for the hand-held mixer from a cabinet door. The sling holds the beater nicely while I do other things in the kitchen. My major problem is that my oven has a fan in it which I can't figure out how to turn off. The springerle are delicate enough that the fan blows them over and they don't look as nice as they should. Doesn't hurt the taste, though!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
BillHartmann's picture

(post #64901, reply #17 of 44)

Baking powder.

Never heard of baking ammonia before.

Found this.

"baker's ammonia = ammonium carbonate = carbonate of ammonia = baking ammonia = bicarbonate of ammonia = ammonium bicarbonate = powdered baking ammonia = triebsalz = hartshorn = salt of hartshorn = hirschhornsalz = hjorthornssalt = hartzhorn Originally made from the ground antlers of reindeer, this is an ancestor of modern baking powder. Northern Europeans still use it because it makes their springerle and gingerbread cookies very light and crisp. Unfortunately, it can impart an unpleasant ammonia flavor, so it's best used in cookies and pastries that are small enough to allow the ammonia odor to dissipate while baking.
Look for it in German or Scandinavian markets, drug stores, baking supply stores, or a mail order catalogue. Don't confuse this with ordinary household ammonia, which is poisonous. Varieties: It comes either as lumps or powder. If it isn't powdered, crush it into a very fine powder with a mortar and pestle or a rolling pin. Substitutes (for 1 teaspoon of baker’s ammonia): 1 teaspoon baking powder (This is very similar, but might not yield as light and crisp a product.) OR 1 teaspoon baking powder plus 1 teaspoon baking soda"

I would not think that BP plus BS would do any good as their is no acid for the BS.

I also use a hand mixer. I should have gotten by mother kitchen aide, but I don't use the mixer that much.

When I started making then I had a little dinky hand mixer and could get through adding about 1/2 the flour and the mixer would start smoking.

I now have a kitchen aid hand held. And I can use it for about 90% of the flour.

To often I make that at the last minute. If I have time I will try mixing one of the batches longer and see what happens.

. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
Maedl's picture

(post #64901, reply #19 of 44)

The old recipes for the Christmas cookies I bake call for baking ammonia. When I look for it in the US, I usually find it at a pharmacy. Here, you can get it at practically any grocery store--in the baking section. You definitely smell it when you crush it--it's the same thing as smelling salts and it really does wake you up. I've never had trouble with the smell or taste lingering in the cookies.

Another unusual leavening is potash--I think that's used for Spekulatus. I haven't used it yet, but it, too, is available at grocery stores and I'm hoping I get a chance this year.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
roz's picture

(post #64901, reply #22 of 44)

For both Bill and Maedl, look at this recipe for the springerle cookies.

http://fxcuisine.com/Default.asp?language=2&Display=168

FX is a very adventuresome cook!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
BillHartmann's picture

(post #64901, reply #23 of 44)

Clearly that web site is the work of satan!

"Vanillin or vanilla sugar or lemon oil or anise oil "

All REAL springerlies are made with anise.

Interesting about the mold. I have a an old molding roller pin. It has ducks, owl, fish, pineapple, wheat stalks, and the like.

It might be because they use weight, but that recipe seems to have a lot less flour than mine and most others that I have found.

4 large or extra large egss
1 lb powdered sugar
1 tsp banking powder
4 cups (more or less) or flour.
1/2 tsp anise oil.

I see that many of them say to beat the mixture after adding the sugar instead of before like mine.

And most of them also call for rolling them out and molding when the batter is made. Then let them set overnight and baking.

Not the day between making the batter and rolling them out that this one calls for.

. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
Maedl's picture

(post #64901, reply #30 of 44)

Roz and Bill,

Interesting article about the Springerle--thanks. The idea that the designs farmers carved for their molds may come from pagan traditions is in keeping with the roots of so many of our celebrations in this region--the Johannifeuer (St John's fires on Midsummer Eve), Assumption Day celebrations, and so many Church traditions were adopted from the pre-Christian people in the region. It provides a sense of enormous continuity--2000 years of Church tradition is impressive, but how much further back do some of these celebrations really go?

Vanilla in Springerle? No way. Springerle are anise flavored and that's that! (Hear the strains in the background of "Tradition" from Fiddler on the Roof?) Other than that, the recipe in the blog is just about the same as mine--and Bill's, except that it is for half the amount of our recipes and that mine (below) uses ammonia.

Springerle don't seem to be very well known in Bavaria--at least in this part of Bavaria. However, they are popular over toward the Black Forest, which leads me to think they are more a part of that region. The fact that Springerle is popular in Switzerland as well reinforces my suspicion because the Swiss German dialect came from the Schwaebisch dialect of German in the Black Forest.

I frequently mix the batch on day one and stash the bowl in the refrigerator. On day two, I roll them out, impress them with the molds, and set them in a cold room to dry until day three, when I bake them. I think this helps the dough dry, and enables it to hold the pattern when it's baked.

As for the molds, in DC I have my great-grandmother's Springerle rolling pin. I think those designs are fairly unsubversive. The molds I have here though were hand carved and have quite a few years on them--I'll have to look at them closely to see if I can find any interesting symbolism!

Springerle

4 large eggs, at room temperature
1 pound powdered sugar
20 drops (about ¼ t anise oil)
4 c. sifted all purpose flour
1 t. hartshorn (aka baking ammonia)
¼ c butter, melted

Before you start: You’ll need Springerle forms or a Springerle rolling pin to make these. Wait until you have several days of cool, dry weather so the cookies will be able to dry properly before they bake. Look for baking ammonia at a pharmacy. Anise oil may be available in a natural foods store—be sure you get an oil suitable for consumption. If you can’t find the oil, use anise extract, but the extract will dissipate during baking.

Directions: Beat eggs in a stand mixer until light. Slow mixer down and continute beating while adding powered sugar. Beat for 15 to 20 minutes, until the mixture is like a soft meringue. Slow the mixer down again and add the anise oil, measuring with a medicine dropper and the butter.

Combing THREE cups of the flour with the baking ammonia and gradually add to the beaten egg mixture. Add enough flour from the fourth cup to make the dough stiff enough to roll.

When the dough is stiff enough, stop mixer, cover with a dishtowel and let rest for 15 minutes. (I put the dough in a covered bowl into the refrigerator—you can leave it over night if you like.

On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough a little thicker than ¼ inch. Dust a Springerle rolling pin or forms with flour and press into dough firmly enough to make clear impressions. Use a pastry cutter to cut the cookies apart and place on creased air-bake cookie sheets. One recipe should fill two sheets.

Let stand uncovered on cookie sheets for 8 hours or overnight. The tops of the cookies must be dry so the designs remain in the cookie after baking.

Bake at 300 degrees for 20 minutes—until set, but not brown. The cookies should be a light straw color when done.

Let the cookies ripen in airtight containers or ziplock bags for several days before eating or freezing.

Makes 50 cookies.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
BillHartmann's picture

(post #64901, reply #31 of 44)

Years ago I found some anise oil in a drug store. But have not for years.

But anise oil is sold as a pharmacy product. IIRC I found some references to use folk medicine.

Last few years I have gotten it at cake decorating supply shop. But they only have it in 1/4 oz bottles.

But many pharmacist don't know that it exist, but they can order it. Right in their catalogs. So last year I order a bottle (1 oz) and that will last me a number of years.

I checked with the cake place and they used to have the baker's ammonia, but don't any more. But gave me a another place that might.

But I am not going to try and special order it.

BTW, the recipes that I have seen that call for anise extract call for 1-2 tsp. And other call for seeds. Some crushed and mixed into the batter. Others whole and sprinkled on the cookies.

I have had some made with the seeds and did not care for them.

. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
Maedl's picture

(post #64901, reply #32 of 44)

You might try a pharmacy for the baking ammonia. That's where my mother used to get hers. Another idea might be to visit a good bakery--maybe even a German bakery--to see if you could buy a bit from them. Ammonia is also used in cream puffs, and it's the season for using it in cookies now. It's too expensive to try to mail order it--I looked into that several years ago and gave up on it. You don't want to buy a large quantity of it, because it doesn't keep from year to year.

And yes, a lot of essential oils from herbs and spices had medicinal uses. In the Latin names for plants, many are denoted "officinalis" which meant that the plant was used for healing purposes.

A friend (who uses molds hand-carved by her husband's great grandfather) sprinkles anise seed on the cookie sheets before she puts the cookies on the sheets. I like the little bursts of flavor, but then I really like anise.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com


Edited 11/12/2008 4:42 pm ET by Maedl

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Jonagold's picture

(post #64901, reply #33 of 44)

After every college vacation  my  roommate from ND brought Kuchen that her German mother had made made.  The kuchen had always been baked in a round layer pan or a pie pan.  The bread part was a typical sweet roll dough but the filling was incredible.  Italian plums , raisins, cottage cheese and peach slices  were the usual toppings, more for decoration than flavor, I think.  Plum and peach were heavenly.


The custard recipe is:


3 cups 1/2 and 1/2 or cream!


2 eggs


1 c. sugar


1 T. flour


Pinch of salt.


Bring cream to boiling point.  Beat eggs.  Mix flour with sugar and salt.  Add to eggs.  Slowly add to cream.  Stir until a runny consistency.  Let cool.  Cover to prevent skin.  I think I may have used 1 1/2 cups for each cake.  She also sprinkled sugar and cinnamon on the top.  I remember storing the kuchen between the window and the screen when the weather was freezing so it would last longer.   The homemade German Dill Pickles were almost as tasty.   Great memories!

gourmand's picture

(post #64901, reply #34 of 44)

Ships free from Amazon.


http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gro?url=search-alias%3Dgrocery&field-keywords=anise+oil&x=2&y=16


 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

BillHartmann's picture

(post #64901, reply #35 of 44)

Thanks,

But I can get it local for about the same price. Just need to remember to get the pharmacy to order it before I need it. And I just got a new bottle last year.

The 3 bottles pack would probably last me 2 lifetimes.

. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
BillHartmann's picture

(post #64901, reply #36 of 44)

I just finished with 2 batches of springerlies.

The first batch I beat the eggs for about 20 minutes. They did seem to get a little thicker after about 14 minutes, but not much.

The 2nd batch I only beat for about 4 minutes.

I did not see any difference in them as I finished mixing in the other stuff. And I could not see any difference after I baked them.

I could not find any baking ammonia without ordering it so I used backing powder.

And my recipe does not use butter.

*IF* I remember I am going to try one batch with the butter next year.

I have not tried making the kuchen yet. Maybe this weekend.

.
William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
Maedl's picture

(post #64901, reply #37 of 44)

I'm in the midst of Springerle baking too. I made only one batch and mixed them for 20 minutes--maybe your mixer is more powerful than mine, because I don't think the eggs would have been thick enough to hold the shape after anything less than 20 minutes.

As I was beating the eggs, I thought of my mother and grandmother, in pre-mixer days, taking turns beating the eggs for almost the entire morning. I also thought of them baking cookies over the years, in the 1920s, then during the years of the Depression and the Second World War. So, I don't consider the 20 minutes that I stood there wasted.

I let the batter sit in the refrigerator overnight and yesterday afternoon I rolled the dough out and pressed it with the molds. I cut out the individual cookies and they are still drying on a cookie sheet in the living, which is the coolest room in the house. I baked one today as a test and it came out quite well, (a friend and I tasted it as part of on-going quality controls efforts) but I am letting the rest sit for another day. It's humid here, and I think they will benefit from an extra day of drying.

I made Lebkuchen batter yesterday and that is mellowing in the refrigerator. Tomorrow, when I have the Springerle baked, I will put the Lebkuchen batter on the Oblaten, and then they will rest in the living room for a day before their turn in the oven. The house is smelling a lot like Christmas right now!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
BillHartmann's picture

(post #64901, reply #38 of 44)

I hope you are not as messy as I am.

It seems that I leave a 1/4 cup of flour in the kitchen for every one that goes into the recipe.

.
William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
Maedl's picture

(post #64901, reply #39 of 44)

I'm notorious for making messes in the kitchen. I have one more batch of cookies to bake, then I will do a major clean-up. But I figured there was no point in doing that until I've finished baking.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
CookiM0nster's picture

(post #64901, reply #7 of 44)

Bill, can you post the custard recipe? This sounds so good I may just make it myself.

BillHartmann's picture

(post #64901, reply #8 of 44)

Will do later today.

. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
BillHartmann's picture

(post #64901, reply #15 of 44)

I used custard generically. I have 3 different fillings.

Now this one says custard, but is a raisin custard.

CUSTARD KUCHEN

4 eggs
1 1/2 C sugar
3 1/2 C milnot (not the skimmed or sweeten vesion)
2-3 C raisins

Plus
2 T cinnamon
1/4 C sugar, Mixed

Beat eggs 1 min at medium speed, add sugar and mix well.
Add milnot, do not beat.

Sprinkle 1/2 to 3/4 cups raisins in each kucken. Pour 1 1/2 C custard in each and sprinkle with cinnamon, sugar mixture.

Bake at 350 3 - 45 minutes. May cover with foil last 10 minutes.

Now this one says for the 4 8" kuchen that the dough is for.

BUTTER KUCHEN

1 stick butter or margarine melted.
1 C sugar
1 T floor
3 large eggs - add one at a time
1/2 tsp vanilla

Mix all together, beat well.

Makes 2 8" Kuchens.

Bake at 340 (no time is give. The 35-45 minutes give above was listed on the dough part of the receipe).

CHEESE KUCHEN

8 oz cream cheese
3 large eggs
1/2 C sugar
1/4 tsp cinnomon
1 small can pienapple, drained.

Mash chease with the sugar, add eggs one at a time. Stire in rest.

1 1/2 C of mixture per kuchen. Makes 2 8"

Bake at 340.

Now this is from the BH&G's

BH&G KUCHEN FILLING.

1 beaten egg
3 Tbl light cream or milk
1 C sugar
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon

2 cups sliced apple, sliced rhubarb, sliced italiam plums, or cottage cheese.

Combine the beaten egg adn milk. Stir in sugar and cinnamon. If using cottage cheese stir in now.

If using apples or rhubarb simmer in water until tender. Place fruit on dough. Then fill with mixture.

Bake 400 for 20-25 min.

Makes 2 9" kuchens.

I suspect that ricotta could be used instead of the cottage cheese.

. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
bunnycook's picture

(post #64901, reply #9 of 44)

I'm in Louisville--the butter kuchen is legendary here!
The Courier-Journal printed a recipe years ago, a copy of it is here:
http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/581/Butter_Kuchen52475.shtml
Hope it helps. --Bunny

BillHartmann's picture

(post #64901, reply #16 of 44)

I see that recipe is the same as mine for the "butter" filling. However, uses oil instead of the butter. I don't think that would be as near as good.

"In fact there is one review of someone that made it with the oil and said that it was bad."

Also I am confused as to the amount it makes.

Now the dough recipe says that it serves 10.

It uses 5 cups of flour and 2 eggs so that it is larger amount then those that say 2 9" or 4 8" which 3 cups of flour and 1 or 2 eggs.

Then it say to divide the dough into 5 parts. Roll out and place in 9" pan.

It IMPLIES that it would make 5 cakes. But 5 cakes would be much more than 10 servings.

And then the filling. The butter one is exactly the same amount as my recipe is for 2 8" ones.

. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe