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incredible pumpkin yeast bread

butterfingers's picture

I made this bread for the third time last weekend, and it just keeps getting better. I made it for my family for Christmas, and I had to hide it from my brothers to keep some for dinner. It's from the King Arthur flour website. If you go to the link, they have a bread pudding recipe to use if the bread goes stale. I've never had that problem, so I haven't tried the bread pudding. I use dried cranberries rather than raisins, and I added some pumpkin seeds once and it turned out okay, but I haven't done it again.

Ginger Pumpkin Braid
Maybe it's our lifelong familiarity with one of the holidays' cliché staples -- pumpkin pie -- but we can hardly imagine baking anything with pumpkin and not including ginger as one of the spices. Ginger and pumpkin are two flavors that just seem to go together, like apples and cinnamon. And they team beautifully in this bright-gold, moist, dense holiday bread. Serve it as the centerpiece of a bread basket at dinner, or with a creamy lunchtime soup.

4 1/2 cups King Arthur Unbleached Special Bread Flour
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves (optional)
1/3 cup sugar
1/3 cup diced candied ginger
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon instant yeast
1 3/4 cups pumpkin*
2 eggs
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, melted
1/2 cup raisins (optional)

*Just plain pumpkin, not pumpkin pie filling.

Manual/Mixer Method: In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, spices, sugar, ginger, salt and yeast, mixing till everything is well-distributed. In a separate bowl, stir together the pumpkin, eggs and melted butter till well-combined. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients, stirring until the dough begins to come away from the sides of the bowl. Knead the dough with an electric mixer for 2 minutes; allow it to rest for 15 minutes, then continue kneading it for an additional 5 to 7 minutes, or until it's smooth. Add the raisins, and continue kneading just until they're incorporated.

If you're kneading by hand, transfer the dough to a lightly oiled work surface; knead it for 3 minutes, allow it to rest for 15 minutes, then continue kneading till smooth, an additional 8 to 10 minutes. Add more flour sparingly, and only if the dough is absolutely impossible to work with by hand. Knead in the raisins right at the end.

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, cover the bowl with plastic wrap, and set it aside to rise for 1 to 1 1/2 hours; it should be just about doubled in bulk.

Bread Machine Method: Place all of the ingredients except the raisins into the pan of your bread machine, program the machine for Manual or Dough, and press Start. This dough may initially be a bit heavy for some machines; if necessary, use a spatula to help it get going. About 10 minutes before the end of the final kneading cycle, adjust the consistency of the dough with additional flour or water; it should be soft and smooth. About 4 to 5 minutes before the end of the kneading cycle, add the raisins. Allow the machine to complete its cycle.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly greased surface, divide it in half then divide each half into three pieces. Roll each piece into a 10-inch log.

Working with three logs at a time, place them on a lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheet. Braid them together; be sure to pinch the ends together well, and tuck them under. Repeat with the remaining logs. Set the braids aside, covered with lightly greased plastic wrap or an acrylic dough-rising cover, to rise for 1 hour; they should look puffy, though not necessarily doubled in bulk.

Bake the bread in a preheated 375°F oven for 20 to 25 minutes, until lightly browned and a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Remove the braids from oven, and allow them to cool on a wire rack. Serve them warm or at room temperature. If any is left over after a few days, use bread to make bread pudding (recipe follows).Yield: two 10-inch braids.

http://ww2.kingarthurflour.com/cgibin/htmlos.cgi/44238.9.1058827731399725823

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63393, reply #1 of 25)

That sounds fabulous. Thanks for posting!

knittermom's picture

(post #63393, reply #2 of 25)

Where it says plain pumpkin, the recipe means a _can_ of pure pumpkin, and not to go and buy a few sugar pumpkins, right? I still have my little bags of leftover cloves, allspice, cardamon and mace that I ground for Christmas cookies, and my 2 boys adore spicy cookies (they eat raw gingerbread house dough with glee as they're running away), so I was going to make it today (rainy and gloomy today in my part of California).

Kris

butterfingers's picture

(post #63393, reply #3 of 25)

I just use canned pumpkin. Plain old Libby's. But I'm sure that you could use fresh, pureed pumpkin if you have it.

knittermom's picture

(post #63393, reply #4 of 25)

Well, I could drive up to Berkeley and hit a farmer's market, but I think I'll stick with Safeway, it is such a "stay at home" day today. Thanks for the recipe!

Kris

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #63393, reply #5 of 25)

Stay-at-home day here, too. In fact Natalie has only been in school 2 days since December 18th.


So i'm trying this bread as well.


thank goodness I always keep a can of pumpkin in the pantry for the dog...


~RuthAnn

~RuthAnn

jillsi's picture

(post #63393, reply #6 of 25)

Dog? Seriously? It doesn't give her the grizzlin' sh*ts? Honest question--tell me more--is it for any specific purpose or just a doggie treat?

 


Humbug!

 

 

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #63393, reply #7 of 25)

weeelll...don't want to gross out a pleasant thread, but it's an all purpose remedy for dogs with tummy trouble.

if they are, well, loose, it firms things up. If they are stoppered up, it moves the mail.


If you want to get some odd looks, go into a grocery store at 2:30 am and buy a single can of pumpkin, nothing else. This was after a trip to the Emergency Vet after Cassie decided to eat the better part of a phone book and the paper clogged her up.


(deepest apologies to TakomaBaker for turning your thread into this)



~RuthAnn


Edited 1/7/2005 2:09 pm ET by Kitchen Witch

~RuthAnn

knittermom's picture

(post #63393, reply #8 of 25)

This makes me laugh, since I'm a pregnant lady who jealously guards her stash of orange and lemon flavored prunes from Sunkist, but now, I'm _really_ looking forward to this bread!

Double apologies if this is way too much information, I'm hoping you ladies know that pregnancy isn't just about looking glowy and floating on a cloud, <<smile>>.

Kris

jillsi's picture

(post #63393, reply #9 of 25)

Congratulations--when are you due? Feeling well, I hope.

 


Humbug!

 

 

knittermom's picture

(post #63393, reply #12 of 25)

I'm at the dead even halfway point (due end of May), and doing okay, with just a little bit of nausea left. More importantly, everything looks good with the baby, and we're going to end up with three boys (which is disappointing to some of the aunts and grandmas, but tickles me). Thanks for asking!

Kris

jillsi's picture

(post #63393, reply #13 of 25)

I have an unreasonably narrow-minded preference for baby boys! Enjoy him and take good care of yourself!

 


Humbug!

 

 

TracyK's picture

(post #63393, reply #10 of 25)

Pumpkin has lots and lots and lots of fiber. Pumpkin-bran muffins are yummy... and good for you, too!


You say I'm a b---- like that's a bad thing.

knittermom's picture

(post #63393, reply #14 of 25)

TracyK, we eat a lot of sweet potatoes, but pumpkin might become a staple if this bread is as yummy as it sounds. Pumpkin muffins too - good idea.

KW, I've often wondered why someone doesn't write a book called "The Dark Side of Pregnancy", it just isn't any fun sometimes!

Kris

Aberwacky's picture

(post #63393, reply #15 of 25)

Check out "The Girlfriends Guide to Pregnancy."  It covers the darks side with lots of humor.


(Thanks, KW!)


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
KitchenWitch's picture

(post #63393, reply #11 of 25)

yup. and as soon as the baby pops out, I started taking dulcolax.
There are some things scarier than holdign a newborn for the first time.  ;) 

~RuthAnn

~RuthAnn

Aberwacky's picture

(post #63393, reply #16 of 25)

Prunes, now why didn't I think of that!


I'm getting a little tired of shredded wheat.  And I might have to add a bit more pumpkin to my diet, too.


Leigh (another pregnant lady, due a couple weeks after you)


P.S. More apologies to Takomabaker!

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
knittermom's picture

(post #63393, reply #17 of 25)

I remember you're expecting too, Leigh, and aren't you having a boy, too?

The prunes are the _only_ thing that works (my sister even had me try powdered sea kelp), and I need to eat them every day, or I rue skipping them. The orange flavored ones from Sunkist are actually a little enjoyable as opposed to the plain ones, which are like taking your medicine.

Kris

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #63393, reply #18 of 25)

it's all the iron in the prenatal vitamins that does it. 

I didn't have too much trouble, since I couldn't take the prenatals. (I have enough trouble swallowing small pills - giant ones, when i'm nauseated? forget it! NFW.) I took a regular vitamin powder and ate a lot of meat and iron rich foods.


Get "The Girlfriend's Guide to Pregnancy." she addresses this particular problem, and it's hilarious.  


~RuthAnn

~RuthAnn

Aberwacky's picture

(post #63393, reply #19 of 25)

My OB said it also has to so with the natural muscle relaxants your body produces during pregnancy--apparently they contribute to the slowdown.


I just checked my prenatal (I'm on one of the bare-necessity ones, with just B vitamins and calcium) and it doesn't have added iron, so I can't blame them.  Darn.


More prunes for me!


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Jean's picture

(post #63393, reply #20 of 25)

And don't forget to drink lots of water... even when you're tempted not to b/c of all the BR trips.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Aberwacky's picture

(post #63393, reply #21 of 25)

Yes, ma'am, will do.  I drink lots of water anyway, but have noticed I've been extra thirsty the last several months.


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Doris1149's picture

(post #63393, reply #22 of 25)

"This makes me laugh, since I'm a pregnant lady who jealously guards her stash of orange and lemon flavored prunes from Sunkist, but now, I'm _really_ looking forward to this bread!"


Love those flavored prunes, too. But I tried the new cherry flavor OMG! I think they may use Robitussin cough syrup for the cherry flavor.


DJ-

DJ-

Aberwacky's picture

(post #63393, reply #23 of 25)

Love those flavored prunes, too. But I tried the new cherry flavor OMG! I think they may use Robitussin cough syrup for the cherry flavor.


Cough syrup ruined me on cherry-flavored candy.  Yuck.


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
UncleDunc's picture

(post #63393, reply #24 of 25)

>> I think they may use Robitussin cough syrup for the cherry flavor.

I think that was the flavor source for Diet Cherry 7-Up, too. <shudder>

knittermom's picture

(post #63393, reply #25 of 25)

I made this bread Friday - actually a double batch, since the store only had the big cans of pumpkin - and it is almost all gone. I didn't have the candied ginger on hand, but I did use extra ginger and cinnamon, plus some allspice, cardamon and cloves. My youngest son especially loves it to death, and when we were hosting Lego Club yesterday, one little boy shocked his mother by eating 3 pieces, one piece slathered with cream cheese (he's a very picky eater, normally). It is one of those rare breads that isn't at its best straight out of the oven and still warm, but needs to cool down, and is even better the next day. I also loved the dried cranberries in it. It is definitely going into my recipe notebook where I keep the ones I use often (I got tired of running to this site every time I wanted to make a T&T recipe).

Oh, and I'm happy to report that it is very friendly to us pregnant ladies, no more details needed! Off to look for some pumpkin muffin recipes now...

DJ, I will be sure to avoid the cherry ones, since I would have brought cherry flavored prunes in a second.

Kris