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The Hand Made Loaf

SallyBR1's picture

The Hand Made Loaf (post #64645)

in

got the book on Friday - I am in love.

http://www.amazon.com/Handmade-Loaf-Dan-Lepard/dp/1845333896/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1205067111&sr=8-1

this is the kind of book that makes you want to drop everything and go try the recipes.

75% of the recipes require that you create your own leaven - from a mixture of rye flour, regular flour, raisins and yogurt

call me nuts, but I started my leaven yesterday - should be good to go in 6 days!

as for how to make the bread, he uses very little kneading, 15 seconds max, allowing the dough to rest after each kneading cycle, anywhere from 10 minutes to 1 hour, depending on the recipe.

today I will try one simple loaf that does not require the leaven, and see how it goes.

The recipes in the book are divided by country - you won t find French baguettes, for instance. France is the last country he writes about, and the breads listed are: oatcakes, barley flatbread, and salt and sour berry crispbread.
Pretty unusual stuff.

I will report back.....

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #70 of 92)

Bringing this thread up again....

this weekend bread project was the "Rolled Oat and Apple Loaf" from page 82

I chose this one because I needed a reasonably "fast" bread - one I could start around noon and have it ready at dinner time.

it takes white leaven and commercial yeast - just three kneadings, form the loaf, allow it to rise 1.5 hours and bake it

I have a couple of pictures, will try to post later or tomorrow -

the loaf is delicious - contrary to all others I made from this book, this is not as much about the crust. The crust browns quite a bit, but does not get hard as in the white leaven or potato loaves.

Jean, for your hubby, who is anti-Swiss-bread, this would be a good one to make.

The grated apple gives it a slight hint of sweetness (I confess I added just a little more salt to the recipe because after baking a few loaves from the book, I realize he under-salts it for my taste).

in the book, it says that the oats and apple will result in a moist bread that will keep for a few days. We shall see... :-)

Stay tuned, pictures ASAP

Research is to see what everybody has seen and to think what nobody else has thought.

Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

(through MadMom, March 2008).
case4's picture

(post #64645, reply #71 of 92)

Hi Sally,


I meant to reply earlier, but work has been really busy ... it is spring, which means lots of new babies!!


Back to baking, I've made this loaf several times and enjoyed it each time. My kids like it too. The crust isn't too hard and the crumb is tight, but light and not chewy. I think I may have to make it this week. Looking forward to your report. cheers 

SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #72 of 92)

Thanks for reminding me - I totally forgot about posting the pictures

I did not make a full series of photos this time, only two - after the bread was baked and a cross section of it.

I think the pictures give a pretty good idea of the "chew" and texture of the bread. For those who never made it, keep in mind that the crust looks hard, but in fact it is not.

The bread is as tasty today as it was yesterday - we have very little left, tomorrow it should be finished. I am sure it will still be good and moist.

Research is to see what everybody has seen and to think what nobody else has thought.

Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

(through MadMom, March 2008).
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case4's picture

(post #64645, reply #73 of 92)

Sally, that is a  beautiful loaf you baked! A few months back, when I first made this loaf, I remember thinking, the kids will never like the thick crust. However, the crust just "looked" thick, but in fact it was easy to chew. Great "oaty" flavour, but I could not detect apple. I think the apple contributes to the moist crumb, but not flavour.


On another note, I've made the linseed (flax bread) three times over the last 2 weeks. My memory seems to be failing, so I thought all those omega-3 in the flax would be helpful (not detectable at this point). Anyhow, just a note, but the kids really liked the "hippie" bread. It tastes great with fresh goat cheese. I may make the Alsace loaf with Rye (page 49) tomorrow. I don't have a rye leaven, just the regular white leaven. So we'll see.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #74 of 92)

Hello there!

to change your white leaven into rye, all you have to do is to feed it with rye flour when you make the amount needed for the bread. That's what I did with mine when I made the breads that called for it.

if you want to be really strict about it, feed it twice, start making the batch 2 evenings before. I fed only once - the resulting levain will be about 75% rye, I think that's good enough

Research is to see what everybody has seen and to think what nobody else has thought.

Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

(through MadMom, March 2008).
SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #61 of 92)

One more recipe tried this weekend.

Flaxseed (linseed) and wheat bread - this one does not take the levain, just commercial yeast.

Hubby requested it, former hippie he is, wanted to have a rustic, full of seeds bread.

It is not my kind of bread, I should say - I did not have much fun making it, it did not behave like the other doughs, never got really smooth and nice to work with. DId not have much oven spring either

I am posting some photos just in case - the first shows the baked little loaf and the raw one, waiting to be baked.

Hubby loved the bread - says it's just what he wanted, so I am happy. But next week I get to pick a new bread, and it will definitely be a less hippie one. :-)

Research is to see what everybody has seen and to think what nobody else has thought.

Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

(through MadMom, March 2008).
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case4's picture

(post #64645, reply #62 of 92)

Wow, it looks beautiful. I can "almost" taste it! I think I'll have to make that one. Is that the one on page 94, linseed and wheat bread?

SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #65 of 92)

yeap, that's the one, page 94

if you look at his picture, the density of seeds seems lower. I think his bread rose more than mine. I think I used a different flour - I had stone ground organic whole wheat, maybe that affected the hydration. THe dough seemed too stiff by comparison to others. I added a little bit more water, but still did not seem to help

oh, well - hubby is happy, that's what matters...

Research is to see what everybody has seen and to think what nobody else has thought.

Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

(through MadMom, March 2008).
Plover's picture

(post #64645, reply #66 of 92)

My experience with stone-ground flours is that they are often more coarsely ground than ordinary flour - and this affects gluten development and rising.

I always used to include some white flour in bread when I used stone-ground. And I always used a sponge method.

Marcia's picture

(post #64645, reply #63 of 92)

Sally, your loaves are genuinely beautiful. I used to make hippie bread, but I was the only one who liked it - white bread for the rest of the family, though I kept trying.

schnitzel's picture

(post #64645, reply #64 of 92)

Cool hippie bread! Good work, Sally.

Lazio1954's picture

(post #64645, reply #67 of 92)

Sally, that looks gorgeous!! You are becoming quite an artist with bread. I look forward to next week's selection!

Silvana

We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.
Winston Churchill

Silvana We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill
SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #68 of 92)

This week I am repeating the "white leaven" bread - but started it yesterday, did the first three series of kneadings (spaced by 10 min and 30 min) - then put the dough in the fridge.

today at 5am I removed it and will do the final kneadings - should be able to bake right around 2pm.

we have a couple over for dinner, and I wanted to have a tried and true - I hope the overnight stretch in the fridge won t hurt..

Research is to see what everybody has seen and to think what nobody else has thought.

Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

(through MadMom, March 2008).
Lazio1954's picture

(post #64645, reply #69 of 92)

The overnight stretch should just improve the flavour. I usually let my doughs go vernight just because I like the depth it gives them. Good luck!

Silvana

We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.
Winston Churchill

Silvana We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill
SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #75 of 92)

Not a big project this weekend, but yesterday I made another loaf from this book: Light caraway rye bread, page 68

sorry, no pictures

this is a reasonably fast bread to make - a pre-ferment with rye flour and commercial yeast, wait 2 hours and use it for the final loaf, which is baked in a loaf tin after a `1.5 hour rise. NOt much kneading at all.

the bread does not rise that much, I guess rye flour is a lot denser.

it is very tasty, very good toasted. The kind of dense European loaf, dense, but not too heavy.

Research is to see what everybody has seen and to think what nobody else has thought.

Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

(through MadMom, March 2008).
SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #76 of 92)

Just bringing this thread to life, as I haven t posted much about it lately

however, I've been making the "white leaven bread" almost every weekend now.

It is amazing to me the difference from time to time - I posted pictures of my first bread, made right when the levain was ready. That gave me a very holey bread, with a darker crumb. I think it was my favorite of all.

after that, each time it was a little different - but always excellent.

Last night I made one round loaf, with about 60% of the dough, and the remaining 40% I turned into two "baguette" kind. The crumb had the uneven holes I hope for, but not the huge holes the first loaf had. Also, the crumb was lighter.

this is by far the best recipe I've tried - it does take a long time, but very little hands on time, as each kneading takes only 10-15 seconds. Still, from the beginning to placing it in the oven one needs about 8 hours. I started yesterday at 6am and the bread was out of the oven 4:45pm.
(or, as Willie Ray would put it, 4:45pm in the afternoon.... sorry, MadMom, could not resist :-)

I keep wanting to try other recipes in the book, but after making 5 different ones, I keep coming back to this.

Research is to see what everybody has seen and to think what nobody else has thought.

Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

(through MadMom, March 2008).
SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #77 of 92)

Just bringing this back to life

by now, I think I've made the levain bread at least 12 times - last weekend and this weekend I decided to incorporate a small change: added a little bit of commercial yeast to the dough

for the whole batch, I added 0.5 t yeast

essentially, what it did was speed up the last couple of risings - particularly the final rise, that normally would take 4.5 hours, I could now reduce to 3 hs. In part, I did that because it made my life easier - I can start the dough at 6:00am and have it ready to bake around 2:30pm

I am not sure the author of the book would approve my changes, but the bread is excellent - crumb is a little lighter, but the taste is the same as that from home made levain.

SInce other people here have the book, I thought I should mention my experiments...

"Her green thumb was so black, she couldn't even grow zucchini"



(Glenys, August 2008).
SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #78 of 92)

Bringing this thread back to life....

made another recipe from the book - I've been making the white levain often, but decided to try the "Mill Loaf", which uses a similar technique, but instead of white flour, a mixture of white, whole wheat and rye

the crumb was a lot tighter in this loaf, sorry I did not take pictures of the crumb, but it had the same impressive oven spring of the white levain, and nice crust, excellent taste. A very good bread, with delicate sourdough flavor, not at all pronounced.

I fed my starter for 2 days, three feedings - and made half the recipe (the full recipe makes two loaves, way too much for us)

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case4's picture

(post #64645, reply #79 of 92)

The Mill Loaf is my fav from the book (or at least the recipe I've made the most). I've refreshed my starter twice in the last 24hours and plan a third tonight. Monday is my day off, so I plan to make/bake the mill loaves tomorrow.


Your loaves look great. :)  I think the last time I made this bread, I shaped 3 loaves instead of 2. I usually freeze the extras. I generally find, 15 min in a warm oven okay to refresh after defrosting, works well.


I'm eager to try the Pear, Walnut, gorgonzola bruschetta recipe, but had to have the bread first ( http://fxcuisine.com/Default.asp?language=2&Display=228 ). Cheers

FitnessNut's picture

(post #64645, reply #80 of 92)

These look great! Who would guess that you used to say you were "yeast challenged"?

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell
SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #81 of 92)

(blushing.....)

well, I have to say I finally reached a goal I set for me more than 8 years ago: bake bread on a regular basis.

I am keeping a pretty serious bread journal - it helps a lot to understand the mistakes and avoid them (of course, I make different mistakes each time)

FitnessNut's picture

(post #64645, reply #82 of 92)

The journal is a good idea. I end up writing in my books, then can't remember later where the important notation is. ;-)

Bread baking can become obsessive. Unfortunately, so can eating the results. Since I'm here by myself, I haven't been baking much....I just keep feeding the starter!

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell
Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell
Jean's picture

(post #64645, reply #83 of 92)

I'm really impressed with what you're doing. The day to day messing around with it was a deal breaker for me when I started reading the book.  But I suppose as a trained lab scientist, the procedure is right up your alley. Congrats! Keep posting your results, you're an inspiration.



A merry heart does good like a medicine: Prov. 22:17



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #84 of 92)

Jean, this is actually a lot more intimidating before you start doing it regularly.

I don't even think about it that much anymore - it is mechanical.

The starter can sit in the fridge for two full weeks (and I'm sure even longer) without any attention. If I know I'll be making bread in the weekend (now that I have two starters going, sometimes one gets neglected) - I start by grabbing an empty yogurt container and adding 100 g (ml) water to it. I don't even check the temp, can be lukewarm, can be cold. To this I add about 1 T or 2 of starter. This is important because you want to avoid a pH too acidic to start with. Mix well, add 125 g flour.

leave it overnight.

next day and any other feeding goes: 55 + 100 + 125
(starter/water/flour)

that is about it. Ideally you want to use your starter when it puffs all the way up, before the collapse. But even a "collapsed" starter will work well. ONce you get the hang of it, you know that on the first feeding the starter will rise more slowly, as it gets more and more "alive", it will rise up quicker - so you can time your last feeding to have it JUST right. But again, this is all very forgiving.

all this rising up and down.... oh, well - I might as well shut up before I get myself in trouble.

Jean's picture

(post #64645, reply #85 of 92)

See--already you lost me after leave it overnight. LOL



A merry heart does good like a medicine: Prov. 22:17



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #86 of 92)

oops, my mistake

I forgot the grams

next day (and any day after the first "revival from cold" )

you mix 55g bubbly, fermented starter + 100g (ml) water + 125 g flour

Some folks do it all by volume, I prefer to stick to weight measurements

MadMom's picture

(post #64645, reply #87 of 92)

LOL - doesn't leave it overnight sort of assume that one knows what one will want to do the following day?  I'm lucky if I know what's for supper at 4 p.m., much less the day before!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jean's picture

(post #64645, reply #88 of 92)

I hear you.  I think that's when you look at the recipe. LOL



A merry heart does good like a medicine: Prov. 22:17



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #89 of 92)

You and Jean are both teasing me, right?????

naughty naughty you two!

MadMom's picture

(post #64645, reply #90 of 92)

Ohhh, come on back and join us in the corner.  Your regular seat will get cool if you aren't in it!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!