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The Hand Made Loaf

SallyBR1's picture

The Hand Made Loaf (post #64645)

in

got the book on Friday - I am in love.

http://www.amazon.com/Handmade-Loaf-Dan-Lepard/dp/1845333896/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1205067111&sr=8-1

this is the kind of book that makes you want to drop everything and go try the recipes.

75% of the recipes require that you create your own leaven - from a mixture of rye flour, regular flour, raisins and yogurt

call me nuts, but I started my leaven yesterday - should be good to go in 6 days!

as for how to make the bread, he uses very little kneading, 15 seconds max, allowing the dough to rest after each kneading cycle, anywhere from 10 minutes to 1 hour, depending on the recipe.

today I will try one simple loaf that does not require the leaven, and see how it goes.

The recipes in the book are divided by country - you won t find French baguettes, for instance. France is the last country he writes about, and the breads listed are: oatcakes, barley flatbread, and salt and sour berry crispbread.
Pretty unusual stuff.

I will report back.....

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #1 of 92)

Sorry, the subject should be HANDMADE loaf

what was I thinking??????

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

case4's picture

(post #64645, reply #2 of 92)

I've got the book too. Everything I've made from it has turned out well. Last week I made the crisp cornmeal sticks (like bread sticks) pg 74. They were a great accompaniment to the beef soup. Plus, they went over very well with the kids despite the small amount of onion. I've made with success, the simple mill loaf, the white leaven bread, the rolled oat and apple bread, and the crusty potato bread. I like the multiple knead-rest technique. The pics are very useful, especially what the leaven should look like each day. Cheers

SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #3 of 92)

I am making the simple milk loaf, page 46

will start as soon as I come back from my run.... seems quite straightforward, although I don t have fresh yeast as he recommends.

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

case4's picture

(post #64645, reply #4 of 92)

I didn't use the fresh yeast, I rather prefer the rapid rise, just smaller volume, 1 tsp. I hope it turns out well. cheers

SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #5 of 92)

I might indeed be in love - if the pictures turned out ok, I'll post

this was a fantastic loaf, looked just like the picture in the book, tasted great - I was unsure about the addition of maple syrup - it does not make it sweet at all.

as he says in the book, every time you go back to knead after the resting period, the dough feels a little different - I can see now that whenever I made bread with intense kneading, my dough never reached the consistency it did with this method

Well, my levain is now on the third day, this evening I'm supposed to give it 4 tsp rye + 4 tsp regular flour - by tomorrow maybe I can start to detect the fermentation -

I hope I'll be able to make my first loaf on Saturday

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

case4's picture

(post #64645, reply #6 of 92)

Good job!! I made the simple milk loaf last Fall, I think it is time to make it again -- thanks for the incentive. cheers

SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #7 of 92)

Ok, here are some photos

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

PreviewAttachmentSize
bread1.jpg
bread1.jpg321.56 KB
bread2.jpg
bread2.jpg350.2 KB
bread3.jpg
bread3.jpg362.51 KB
Amy's picture

(post #64645, reply #8 of 92)

This is the milk bread? NICE! Sally baked great looking bread!

case4's picture

(post #64645, reply #9 of 92)

Beautiful!!! That loaf looks perfect, I can almost smell it all the over here! How is the leaven coming along?

Jean's picture

(post #64645, reply #10 of 92)

Now that is beautiful.  I've ordered the book from the library. Can't wait to try it.



Youth is fleeting. Immaturity, however, can last forever.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Debby's picture

(post #64645, reply #11 of 92)

Sally, this is absolutely beautiful!!  How thrilled you must have been!


Debby

SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #15 of 92)

Leaven looks pretty disgusting as it should... :-)

actually yesterday you are supposed to discard 75% of the levain, add 100ml water to what is left, strain the raisins and feed with flour

now it looks more like a thick paste - and this morning I see clear bubbles of fermentation. Pretty nice!

today is my last feeding, again removing 75% of it and keeping the rest

looking good for a Saturday loaf

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

Jean's picture

(post #64645, reply #16 of 92)

What made me think there was no waste with these recipes?



Youth is fleeting. Immaturity, however, can last forever.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
knitpik's picture

(post #64645, reply #18 of 92)

I've read that you can save the discards in a jar and make pancakes when you have enough. Those with more experience in the sourdough dept. might be able to help you.

Jean's picture

(post #64645, reply #19 of 92)

I like that idea but---I've never seen DH eat a pancake and they're pretty much forbidden on my diabetic regimen.  Others here might welcome that option though.



Youth is fleeting. Immaturity, however, can last forever.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
knitpik's picture

(post #64645, reply #20 of 92)

I think you can also throw it with another bread dough then reduce the amount of flour and water by what's in the "discard".

Lazio1954's picture

(post #64645, reply #24 of 92)

That's exactly what I did with mine. I did find however that I had to decrease the yeast more and more as the Levain got stronger ad stronger. It makes for really interesting bread as you go.

Silvana

We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.
Winston Churchill

Silvana We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill
knitpik's picture

(post #64645, reply #25 of 92)

Makes sense. I'll have to give this whole sourdough thing another go once my kitchen renovation is done. Maybe next fall;-)

Lazio1954's picture

(post #64645, reply #26 of 92)

A kitchen reno??? Do tell......


 


Silvana

We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.
Winston Churchill

Silvana We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill
knitpik's picture

(post #64645, reply #27 of 92)

Nothing to talk about...just changed the ceiling tiles and now we are waiting for the floor guys to fix the floor before we put the new linoleum. So all the furniture and half of my kitchen stuff is in the basement waiting. Going on 3 months. <sigh>

SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #21 of 92)

I guess you can always discard less and make more levain

I have a small problem, though - anyone who has the book, please help

Unless I made a huge mistake somewhere in the recipe, my levain weighs a little less than 300g - the recipes call for 500g of levain

did I screw up royally again????????????????????????????????????

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

case4's picture

(post #64645, reply #22 of 92)

It is okay, don't worry, just add some water and flour (like a refreshment) to make up what you need, plus some more. You may have to wait 12-24h until it is bubbly and active to bake. Remember to save some leaven "mother" for your next baking.

Lazio1954's picture

(post #64645, reply #23 of 92)

Sally, when you feed your Levain, you can add up to twice it's weight in flour, and the appropriate amount of water to keep the hydration level you work with. For best results you should refresh your Levain within 48 hours of using it; 24 hours is best.


How much Levain you keep on hand is entirely a matter of preference as you can easily triple it in a matter of 6-8 hours. I find there is a difference in flavour (not as strong if you triple it) and strength (not as active if you double it) but that difference is minimal to my perception.


Silvana

We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.
Winston Churchill

Silvana We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill
SallyBR1's picture

(post #64645, reply #30 of 92)

To Silvana and case4

I went to the forum linked to Dan Lepard (did I mention he is very attractive? bald.... bald men are something.... Phil refuses to shave his head, how can he be so mean to me?)

ANYWAY.... I digress

here is what I got - pretty precise directions of what to do, so I decided to share with you both, and anyone interested. THat is pretty much what you do anyway, but just in case:

==========================================================
You need to do another refreshment cycle to take your total amount of leaven up to 500g plus some left over for storage (I'd suggest making it up to 600g)

As a rough rule of thumb for leaven that gets refreshed once in the 24 hours prior to baking, you want a quarter of the weight of the final amount of leaven to come from your old leaven, the rest coming from the flour and water you add during the refreshment. In this case we want 600g of leaven so we will use 150g of the old leaven and add a total of 450g of flour and water. In THML Dan uses a ratio of 4 parts water to 5 parts flour for refreshing the leaven so we will add about 200 g of water and 250g of flour to the 150g of leaven, give it a good stir, and leave at room temperature for 18-24 hours.

On baking day remove 500g of leaven and use as directed by the recipe. Take 75g of the remaining leaven and refresh with 100g of water and 125g of flour (to make it back up to 300g) and either store in the fridge if not baking again for a few days, or leave out and continue refreshing every 24 hours as per the book until the day before baking when you need to make it up to the particular quantity of leaven that the recipe calls for.

================================================================

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

Lazio1954's picture

(post #64645, reply #31 of 92)

Thanks for sharing. There seems to be as many ways of refreshing Levain as there are people using it!


It's always fun to see how another pro does it.


Silvana

We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.
Winston Churchill

Silvana We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill
Sondra's picture

(post #64645, reply #12 of 92)

Woohoo, go Sally!  Great bread, I have this book, and have not been home long enough to get the starter going lately.  So it's going to the top of my list of cookbooks to work with when I get home.

annieqst's picture

(post #64645, reply #14 of 92)

Ooee! Nice looking bread. Too bad you can't post the smell too! ;)

knitpik's picture

(post #64645, reply #13 of 92)

Nice looking loaf, Sally. Seems like the "trend" is less and less kneading. Hamelmann uses very little kneading too with a stretch and fold at the one hour mark. I've adapted it to some recipes where I don't have time to develop the dough fully. When I come back after one hour, I do a stretch and fold and let it rise another hour. Works fine.

Sheri's picture

(post #64645, reply #17 of 92)

Your bread looks great. I think it's another one I need to look at.

gourmand's picture

(post #64645, reply #28 of 92)

Free shipping...ships in 4 to 7 weeks?

 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.

 Growing old is inevitable, Growing up is optional.