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Grating Chocolate

deejeh's picture

Grating Chocolate (post #63414)

in

How does everybody grate chocolate so that you end up with fine crumbs, not half-melted bits?  In grating chocolate for the pecan bars from #70, I started with the small grater blade on the KA food processor, then moved to the larger blade, then to a box grater, then to the Zyliss hand grater, and finished with a vegetable peeler :(  The food processor melts as much chocolate as it grates, and any of the other methods that involve holding the block of chocolate are pretty messy too.  Not to mention that the grated chocolate is so full of static electricity all you have to do is look at it and it flies around the room.  Does anybody have a reasonably non-messy, non-wasteful way of doing this?


deej

Meryl's picture

(post #63414, reply #1 of 21)

deej, you can freeze the chocolate before grating to prevent melting.


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

deejeh's picture

(post #63414, reply #2 of 21)

I can't believe I never thought of that - truly a "duh" moment.


Thanks, Meryl


deej

Adele's picture

(post #63414, reply #3 of 21)

I do that with certain cheeses too.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Lword's picture

(post #63414, reply #4 of 21)

Chilling the grater also helps.

L.

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
Meryl's picture

(post #63414, reply #6 of 21)

Another good idea.


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Meryl's picture

(post #63414, reply #5 of 21)

Good idea - will have to try that.


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Glenys's picture

(post #63414, reply #7 of 21)

Grating chocolate doesn't mean a grater is the tool. The best grated chocolate is shaved with a serrated bread knife.

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #63414, reply #8 of 21)

What is the best way to chop chocolate without it flying all over the place? 

Aberwacky's picture

(post #63414, reply #9 of 21)

When I grated pounds and pounds of it for hot chocolate gifts this Christmas, I used my KA food processor, the large grating disk, chilled the chocolate and did it in smallish batches.


There was a little bit of static, but I just tapped the bowl VERY firmly before I took off the lid, which helped a lot.


I also put a sheet of parchment down underneath the food proccessor to catch the inevitable small bits that got everywhere.  That worked well--not only did it make cleanup easier, it allowed me to save all the chocolate!


One note:  if you grate a lot of it this way, some finely grated chocolate inevitably gets in between the spindle and the hole in the bowl, melts and then hardens up, making it hard to get the bowl off.  I recommend wiping down the spindle every time you remove the bowl between batches to get rid of the little chocolate bits.


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #63414, reply #10 of 21)

Learn to use a chef knife

Aberwacky's picture

(post #63414, reply #11 of 21)

I used a chef's knife for the first pound.  For the last 10, I used my food processor.


Leigh


 

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
KarenP's picture

(post #63414, reply #12 of 21)

Learn to use a chef knife

 I put a lot of drawers in this kitchen and I'm going to use them, dammit! ;-)

Gretchen's picture

(post #63414, reply #13 of 21)

When I grated pounds and pounds of it for hot chocolate gifts this Christmas, I used my KA food processor, the large grating disk, chilled the chocolate and did it in smallish batches.


I wonder if the slicing disc would work.


Gretchen
Gretchen
soccermom's picture

(post #63414, reply #14 of 21)

The slicing disk is a good idea, and I'll try it when I tackle my 10 pound block.

 


 

 

 

Aberwacky's picture

(post #63414, reply #15 of 21)

I did try the slicing disc (can't remember if it was the thick one or the thin one), and it worked pretty well, but it made larger chunks than I wanted for my hot chocolate. 


Leigh


 

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
deejeh's picture

(post #63414, reply #16 of 21)

Thanks for the valuable tips.  I'll be using them the next time.


deej

StevenHB's picture

(post #63414, reply #17 of 21)

When I grated pounds and pounds of it for hot chocolate gifts this Christmas, I used my KA food processor, the large grating disk, chilled the chocolate and did it in smallish batches.


You didn't get any condensation forming on the chocolate once you removed it from the fridge/freezer?  Which did you use?




Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible


Edited 2/2/2005 3:04 pm ET by StevenHB

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
Aberwacky's picture

(post #63414, reply #18 of 21)

No, I don't remember any condensation on the chocolate.  It grated pretty quickly, though, and since it was December, the air in the kitchen was very dry.


I used El Rey (73%, I think) and Callebaut (61%).


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Gretchen's picture

(post #63414, reply #19 of 21)

Well, tell me about the rest of the "hot chocolate gifts", please.

Gretchen

Gretchen
TracyK's picture

(post #63414, reply #20 of 21)

Leigh was the one with the hot chocolate gifts. :-)


You say I'm a b---- like that's a bad thing.

Aberwacky's picture

(post #63414, reply #21 of 21)

This year for Christmas, I gave hot chocolate mix--grated dark chocolate and homemade marshmallows.


I used three kinds of chocolate (I forgot about the white chocolate, Steven!): 73% bittersweet, 61% semisweet and El Rey White, grated them using my food processor, then packaged the chocolate and marshmallows separately in those little cellophane bags, along with instructions.  Some I put in oversized cocoa mugs, some in tins.


The proportions are 3 tablespoons of ground semi or bittersweet chocolate to one cup of milk, and 2 tablespoons white chocolate to one cup of milk.  I use the microwave to heat it, then top with the marshmallows.


Grating allows the chocolate to melt quickly and evenly, and also makes measuring much more accurate.


It's a rich, VERY chocolatey hot chocolate, and was a huge hit. 


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy