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Gingerbread

CookiM0nster's picture

Gingerbread (post #63416)

in

I woke up this morning with a terrific craving for gingerbread (cake, not cookies). I know we've discussed it before, but I was hoping everyone might humor the pregnant lady and discuss it again.

I've got Fledge's recipe on file. Does anyone else have a favorite?

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #63416, reply #1 of 25)

I think I got this recipe from you?


Damp Gingerbread

1. Cream one stick of sweet butter with 1/2 cup of light or dark brown sugar. Beat until fluffy and add 1/2 cup of molasses.
2. Beat in 2 eggs.
3. Add 1 1/2 cups of flour, 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and one very generous tablespoon of ground ginger (this can be adjusted to taste, but I like it very gingery). Add one teaspoon of cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon of ground cloves and 1/4 teaspoon of ground allspice.
4. Add two teaspoons of lemon brandy. If you don't have any, use plain vanilla extract.
Lemon extract will not do. Then add 1/2 cup of buttermilk (or milk with a little yogurt
beaten into it) and turn batter into a buttered tin.
5. Bake at 350 for between twenty and thirty minutes (check after twenty minutes have
passed). Test with a broom straw, and cool on a rack.
Makes one 9-inch cake.


~RuthAnn

~RuthAnn

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63416, reply #10 of 25)

"I think I got this recipe from you?"

LOL, you probably did. I forgot I psoted it. I went looking for it today and couldn't find it (I think this is about the 12th time I've lost it).

Thanks everyone for the recipes. I've printed them all off to try. This is going to keep my happily in gingerbread for a while.

macy's picture

(post #63416, reply #2 of 25)

Here's one I really like. Of the recipes I've tried, it has the best flavor, but always comes out sunken in the middle for me. I cut it into wedges and drizzle a sauce over the top and it looks like it was meant to be that way.   -Macy


This recipe was published in the R.S.V.P. section of the October, 1993 Bon Appetit. It came from the New London Inn in New Hampshire.


THREE GINGER GINGERBREAD


3 cups all purpose flour
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cloves
1 teaspoon ground ginger
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 cup vegetable oil
1 cup unsulphured (light) molasses
1/2 cup water
2 large eggs
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1/2 cup chopped crystallized ginger


Preheat oven to 350ºF. Butter and flour 10-inch-diameter springform pan. Sift first 6 ingredients into medium bowl. Combine sugar, oil, molasses, water, eggs and fresh ginger in large bowl; whisk to blend. Mix in crystallized ginger. Stir in dry ingredients. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake until tester inserted into center of cake comes out clean, about 1 hour. Cool cake in pan on rack 1 hour (cake may fall in center). Run small sharp knife around pan sides to loosen cake. Release pan sides from cake. Serve slightly warm or at room temperature. (Can be prepared I day ahead. Wrap in foil and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before serving.)


10 Servings


Note: I like to pulverize the chopped crystallized ginger with the sugar in the FP and  grate the fresh ginger. (I don't care for chunks.)


Edited 1/31/2005 12:15 pm ET by macy

assibams's picture

(post #63416, reply #3 of 25)

My favorite gingerbread is the Dutch version made with rye flour. Hope helena is reading this thread and can come to the rescue with an authentic recipe. Love it buttered with a good cup of tea.

"...never forget that the first syllable of convenience is con."
Bill Bryson

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Risottogirl's picture

(post #63416, reply #4 of 25)

You'll know the answer!


I was in Antwerpe over the weekend and I stopped in a bakery that had apparently been around for a long time. I bought two squares of a very dry cake that tasted like a gingerbread of sorts. It was not very sweet at all and I really liked it! I believe it was labeled "speculoos".


 I was also served little packets of cookies called the same thing (but looking and tasting quite different) with my coffee in a couple of places.


What is it? Any recipes (for the dry cake stuff)?


Of course the very sweet 90ish year old lady in this place was the ONLY person I encountered the whole time who apparently didn't speak anything but Dutch. Everyone else I encountered spoke French as well  as Dutch and many people spoke English and German too.


 


I was 32 when I started cooking; up until then, I just ate
Julia Child

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

doyenne's picture

(post #63416, reply #6 of 25)

Not Assibams but is this it?


http://www.coquinaria.nl/english/recipes/speculaas.htm


 

Where is Monica Lewinski when you need her?

Risottogirl's picture

(post #63416, reply #12 of 25)

The decription sounds similar as far as flavor goes, but it didn't look like that. Hmmm...Maybe I'll try it when I get back to the US (no oven here).


Thanks!!!


I was 32 when I started cooking; up until then, I just ate
Julia Child

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

assibams's picture

(post #63416, reply #8 of 25)

The cake you describe and name is more like a cookie, right? Spekulatius is pretty good, especially the artisan stuff. What I mean, however, is more like a bread, sort of a 'pain d'epice', but with rye flour. The taste is very similar to spekulatius, but the texture is different.

"...never forget that the first syllable of convenience is con."
Bill Bryson

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Risottogirl's picture

(post #63416, reply #11 of 25)

Well, what I bought in the bakery, was more like a very dry cake or bread. It was cut into squares (much like a brownie). There was no stamping or decoration on it (as in the link Charlotte provided), it was very plain.


The little packets that came with coffee contained little cookies, very crisp, but not dry.



I was 32 when I started cooking; up until then, I just ate
Julia Child


Edited 1/31/2005 5:39 pm ET by RISOTTOGIRL

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

assibams's picture

(post #63416, reply #13 of 25)

I shouldn't read threads like these in the morning, I am HUNGRY and now craving Dutch gingerbread. Your cake does indeed sound like the one I mean, just smaller servings. Love, love, love it with butter. Still hoping for helena to explain all those different terms :-)

"...never forget that the first syllable of convenience is con."
Bill Bryson

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

helena's picture

(post #63416, reply #14 of 25)

I am wondering if you're referring to soemthing we call 'peperkoek' here (it would translate into peppercake, it is softer than a cookie, airy, but fairly firm and a little on the dry side). did it have a sticky, dark brown top layer? That would be a characteristic of it. It tasted basically like speculaas or gingerbread, it has all the spices that go with it. Here it comes in many varieties, with pearl sugar on top, with raisins, nut, chocolate pieces, you name it, we got it.


If this is it, I will try to look up a recipe for you. I have never actually made this before myself, just buy, because the ones that are readily available are so good and tasty ;o). If I can't find the recipe, I will send you some store bought varieties, how's that for a deal?


Astrid, are you thinking about that 'cake' that you bought in that old tea shop in Maastricht? If so, that's definately peperkoek..

assibams's picture

(post #63416, reply #15 of 25)

that 'cake' that you bought in that old tea shop in Maastricht


Yep, that's the one. It did not last long - and I was the only one eating it. Something similar is available in stores here (even imported from the Netherlands), but nowhere near as good. So, unless you are up for frequent care packages (just kidding), I would love a recipe :-)


"...never forget that the first syllable of convenience is con."
Bill Bryson

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Risottogirl's picture

(post #63416, reply #17 of 25)

it is softer than a cookie, airy, but fairly firm and a little on the dry side). did it have a sticky, dark brown top layer?


It was not crisp at all so I guess that is softer than a cookie, but it was quite firm and quite dry. There was no top layer of any kind - it was just plain. Maybe 2.5 cm thick and the squares were 10cm x 10cm. It looked like it was made in a large sheet pan, perhaps. I wish I'd taken a photo!


It tasted like some sort of a spice or ginger cake/bread to me. I thought it was quite delicious because I do not like really sweet things and this was not very sweet. I was confused by the lsign that said "speculoos" because earlier that day, I was served a small very crisp cookie (in a packet) with my coffee and it was called "speculoos" as well. Both tasted of ginger but were quite different.


I love gingerbreads of all types, but I always cut back on sugar and I never "frost" with anything. 


I was 32 when I started cooking; up until then, I just ate
Julia Child

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Gretchen's picture

(post #63416, reply #18 of 25)

If Helena is talking about a pepper cake would this German cookie be a pfeffernusse?

Gretchen

Gretchen
helena's picture

(post #63416, reply #20 of 25)

well, sort of, but in Germany they'd probably speak of 'lebkuchen'. Lots of names for things that are siomilar in taste, yet all different in consistency.

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63416, reply #21 of 25)

Pfeffernuesse are cookies, not cake. Lebkuchen qould be the closest thing, I imagine.

Astrid's picture

(post #63416, reply #22 of 25)

My favorite gingerbread is made with whole wheat flour, which gives it a depth of flavor unbleached just doesn't attain. This is a moist gingerbread.

Old Fashioned Gingerbread

1/2 cup shortening
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 egg
1 cup dark molasses
1 1/2 cups unbl. flour
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. b. soda
1 1/2 tsp. powdered ginger
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 tsp. allspice
1 cup boiling water

Cream shortening. Add brown sugar and beat until fluffy. Add egg, beat well. Blend in molasses. Sift flours, salt, baking powder, and spices together. Add to creamed mixture gradually. Add boiling water and stir until smooth. Batter will be thin. Pour into greased and floured 8" square baking pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 40-45 min.

I have added freshly ground black pepper, lemon zest and chopped crystalized ginger, for extra zing. Also good as written.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63416, reply #23 of 25)

Thanks, Astrid.

helena's picture

(post #63416, reply #19 of 25)

Yup, this still sounds as 'peperkoek' to me. I don't frost anything either, so I understand about the not to sweet thing. And the fact that they use the same name for different type of things is probably because the speculoos refers more to the typical spices used, than to the type of baked product.


Anyway, I'd love to send you some samples, Just email me through my profile and I'd be delighted to let you taste some of the Netherlands' finest ;o)

doyenne's picture

(post #63416, reply #5 of 25)

This is my favorite.


Gingerbread


1/2 cup hot water


1/2 cup molasses


1 tablespoon fresh ginger


1 teaspoon orange zest


1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour


1 teaspoon baking soda


3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon


1/2 teaspoon ground ginger


1/4 teaspoon ground cloves


1/4 teaspoon salt


1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper


4 ounces unsalted butter, room temperature


2/3 cup packed dark brown sugar


1 large egg


Preheat oven to 350 degrees or 325 degrees if the pan you will use has a dark finish. Butter and flour an 8 x 4 inch loaf pan.


Put the hot water in a Pyrex measuring cup and stir in the molasses, fresh ginger and orange zest. Set aside and let the mixture steep.


Sift together the flour, soda, spices, salt and pepper and set aside. Cream the butter until soft and smooth. Add the brown sugar and beat in until the mixture is light and fluffy. Beat in the egg. Add the dry ingredients alternately with the molasses mixture, beginning and ending with the dry ingredients.


Spoon batter into the prepared loaf pan, spread it evenly and bake for about 50 to 55 minutes. Cool in pan for 10 minutes and then turn out cake onto a wire rack to cool. Serve warm or at room temperature.


 


This recipe is from Flo Braker and was printed in the San Francisco Chronicle in November, 2000.


 I usually top this with lemon icing ( confectioners' sugar, warm heavy cream, a small bit of melted, unsalted butter and lemon juice to taste. )


 


 


 

Where is Monica Lewinski when you need her?

RHart18's picture

(post #63416, reply #7 of 25)

I made Florence Tyler's Gingerbread with Cranberry Sauce.  The gingerbread was good, but the Cranberry Sauce was TDF.  I never would have thought of the two together, but the cranberries were spiced with allspice and nutmeg which went terrific with the gingerbread.  Oh and the sauce is served warm.  The leftover sauce we had on waffles and pancakes this weekend.  I can't pass on the recipe because I sent the book back to the library and the copy I made is in my DH's car at the airport.  If it's truly an emergency, I'll go to the library and get the book or to the airport and find his car :)  Maybe someone will be along who has the recipe.

Li's picture

(post #63416, reply #9 of 25)

I lurve this one:

http://www.taunton.com/finecooking/pages/c00125_rec01.asp

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evelyn's picture

(post #63416, reply #16 of 25)

This one's a bit different, but really terrific.

http://www.recipezaar.com/62125 Gingerbread Apple Flan with Apple Custard

 

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
iguana667's picture

(post #63416, reply #24 of 25)

Hey Pregnant Lady! How's it going? Great topic-- I've been having a gingerbread craving too. It must be the nursing! Clara is sleeping here next to my chair. I hope all is well with you!

Ig

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63416, reply #25 of 25)

I can highly recommend the FC recipe Li pointed me to. Dh just finished the last piece tonight. I haven't decided which recipe to try next.

Give Clara a snuggle for me.