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Gateau St Honore

baker69's picture

Gateau St Honore (post #63400)

in

Hello folks,


I'm from Montreal Canada.  I have a fair amount of baking experience from the ordinary (brownies, etc) to wedding cakes. I enjoy baking just for kicks and because of that I am unofficially responsible for all family birthday cakes!


My brother in law loves Gateau St honore and I plan to make one for his upcoming birthday.  Thing is, I am hosting a birthday gathering and since I work during the day, I need to prep things and refrigerated in advance. How far in advance can I make either the entire cake or just the pastry cream and keep them in the refrigerator?


 


Thanks!

soccermom's picture

(post #63400, reply #1 of 10)

Hello, I'm in Toronto. Welcome to CT. I won't offer any advice as I am completely useless in terms of buttercream and other icings. However, lots of people here will be able to give you good advice.

 


 

 

 

chiquiNO's picture

(post #63400, reply #2 of 10)

Since the "shell" of the cake is a cream puff pastry you can make it ahead and keep it in a cardboard box two days in advance and just "crisp" it up in the oven for a few minutes before assembling. 


 


Instead of making a bunch of cream puffs, I piped the puffs in a circle like a wreath so when they baked they stuck together.  When it was cooled, I cut it horizontally and took the top off like a big ring.  I did not make a pastry bottom...just the cream puff shell.  It is so easy this way.  Oh yes, I made a circle of large puffs and then topped with a circle of smaller puffs making it crown-like.  It is beautiful and easy.  Of course the classic filling is pastry cream.  I made mine different.


The last time I made this I filled it with a basic chocolate mousse, put the "lid" on and filled the center with Chantilly cream and fresh strawberries.  I surrounded it with Semi-sweet dipped whole strawberries and scattered a few blueberries.


 


I have also done this with Kiwi and Strawberries.  YUM!



Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans


Edited 1/13/2005 7:28 pm ET by chiqui

 

Biscuits's picture

(post #63400, reply #3 of 10)

Ah, Gateaux St. Honore!  That brings me back!  The memories of all that anxiety with Chef  Bandula.  (G)


Um.  Yes.  Well, to answer your question, (and I'm assuming you already know how to make the thing):


Pate brisee and pate chou:  you can make the ring of pate' brisee and the ring of pate choux and the profiteroles 2-3 days ahead - just keep dry and cool and tightly covered.  Don't refrigerate.


Pastry cream can be made 2 days ahead.  If you are going to fold whipped cream into the pastry cream to lighten, make the pastry cream 2 days ahead but fold the whipped cream into it just prior to assembly.


I'm afraid that everything else - the caramel, the spun sugar, the caramel dipped strawberries (if using) will need to be done that day, but you could do them several hours before serving.  The Gateaux should be assembled no more than a couple of hours before service.  The problem is that, once assembled, the pastry cream needs to stay cool, but the caramel and spun sugar needs to stay dry - so the refrigerator as a storage is out.  If you have a cool part of your house to store it that is dry, that would be ideal, and it could be done several hours ahead.


Ancora Imparo -

Ancora Imparo -

mslee's picture

(post #63400, reply #4 of 10)

Gateau St Hoonore doesn't have caramel or spun sugar - the recipe that you are thinking of in Croque-en-bouche where the cream puffs dipped in chocolate are piled in a pyramind with caramel holding them together then topped with a cage of spun sugar.  It is traditionally served on New Year's Eve.  It is very impressive and time consuming - especially with the time out to treat the burns!

venturedone's picture

(post #63400, reply #5 of 10)

 

Gateau St Hoonore doesn't have caramel or spun sugar

It might.  It might have just about anything.  In the past, I've ordered GSH's from many different specialist bakeries and not one has been the same.  There is probably an "official" recipe for the extravaganza, but there are many variations.

 

Harebrained lagomorph, prestidigitations exist for pre-adolescents.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #63400, reply #6 of 10)

Gateau St Hoonore doesn't have caramel or spun sugar


Here in France, it does!


the recipe that you are thinking of in Croque-en-bouche where the cream puffs dipped in chocolate are piled in a pyramind with caramel holding them together then topped with a cage of spun sugar. 


Here, a Croquembouche is usually made for a wedding and doesn't traditionally have any chocolate.


But, as they say...anything goes!



I was 32 when I started cooking; up until then, I just ate
Julia Child


Edited 1/14/2005 10:27 am ET by RISOTTOGIRL

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

MadMom's picture

(post #63400, reply #7 of 10)

I would tend to trust Biscuit, since she was trained as a pastry chef. 

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

doyenne's picture

(post #63400, reply #8 of 10)

GATEAU ST HONORE
It is a base of puff or short pastry surrounded by choux pastry balls which have been dipped in a caramelized sugar syrup and the middle is filled with a rich custard and garnished with whipped cream.

CROQUEMBOUCHE (means crunch between the teeth)
Puffs are filled with cream and piled on top of each other in a tower. Spun sugar is wrapped around the tower. It is also called a French wedding cake.



 

Where is Monica Lewinski when you need her?

Biscuits's picture

(post #63400, reply #9 of 10)

Yes, it does.  The caramel is what sticks the profiteroles to the top, and the spun sugar is just laid around the base.


Trust me - I took a full year, 5 days a week, 10 hours a day, of pastry classes with a crazy master chef from Belgium.   He drilled the classics into our head every single day. 



Ancora Imparo -


Edited 1/14/2005 10:55 am ET by Biscuit

Ancora Imparo -

chiquiNO's picture

(post #63400, reply #10 of 10)

Ditto what Biscuit said......I just do mine different and don't really call it a GSH!!

Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans