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French Pastry Dough Method

suz's picture

French Pastry Dough Method (post #65192)

in

Thought this unconventional way of making dough was interesting and easy for people like me who shy away from crusts.. Anyone ever try this method?




French Pastry Dough


One 9 (23 cm) tart shell



Adapted from a recipe by Paule Caillat of Promenades Gourmandes



In France, I used type 65 organic flour, which is similar to American all-purpose flour. Paule says that her students report back, saying that the dough works beautifully with American butter, too. Small cracks in the dough are normal so I wouldn't use this for a thin, custardy filling, although it works well filled with chocolate ganache and I would imagine it would be lovely filled with fresh berries resting on a base of pastry cream.



Do be careful with the hot bowl of butter. Not only will the butter spatter a bit when you add the flour, but it's uncommon to have a very hot bowl on the counter and easy to simply give in the urge to grab it with your bare hands.



90 g (3 ounces) unsalted butter, cut into pieces
1 tablespoon vegetable oil (I used canola)
3 tablespoons water
1 tablespoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
150 g (5oz, or 1 slightly-rounded cup) flour



Preheat the oven to 410º F (210º C).



1. In a medium-sized ovenproof bowl, such as a Pyrex bowl, combine the butter, oil, water, sugar, and salt.



2. Place the bowl in the oven for 15 minutes, until the butter is bubbling and starts to brown just around the edges.



3. When done, remove the bowl from oven (and be careful, since the bowl will be hot and the mixture might sputter a bit), dump in the flour and stir it in quickly, until it comes together and forms a ball which pulls away from the sides of the bowl.



4. Transfer the dough to a 9-inch (23 cm) tart mold with a removable bottom and spread it a bit with a spatula.



5. Once the dough is cool enough to handle, pat it into the shell with the heel of your and, and use your fingers to press it up the sides of the tart mold. Reserve a small piece of dough, about the size of a raspberry, for patching any cracks.



(Paule takes a fork and reinforces the dough to the sides, which I didn't find necessary.)



6. Prick the dough all over with the tines of a fork about ten times, then bake the tart shell in the oven for 15 minutes, or until the dough is golden brown.



7. Remove from the oven and if there are any sizable cracks, use the bits of reserved dough to fill in and patch them.



I find it best to pinch off a small amount of the reserved dough, roll it gently between your fingers to soften it, then wedge it into the cracks, smoothing it gently with your pinky.



8. Let the shell cool before filling.

roz's picture

(post #65192, reply #1 of 10)

Yes, I tried this earlier this summer and found it easy. The result is a very fragile crust. I didn't end up using a filling, we just nibbled away!

The important instruction is don't forget the bowl is really, really hot! Next time I'm going to use my LC pot, my mind will automatically think LC = HOT!

Tell us what you plan on filling the shell with....

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
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suz's picture

(post #65192, reply #5 of 10)

It's going to be apple season soon, so this is what I was considering.


 



Apple Frangipane Tart




Tart Crust


I used the tart recipe found on David Lebovitz's site. It is one of my new favorite standbys. :)



Frangipane Cream



1/3 cup white sugar


6 tablespoons unsalted butter


2 large eggs


1 teaspoon vanilla 


1 cup almond meal (flour)


2 tablespoons all purpose flour


1/4 tsp cinnamon


1/4 tsp salt




Cream the butter and sugar together. Then add the eggs and vanilla and blend well. Sift in the flour almond meal, cinnamon and salt and beat till fluffy. 




Apple Topping


3 large Granny Smith Apples (or Golden Delicious)


1 T. lemon juice


1 T. honey or apricot jelly


1 T. raw sugar (opt.)


1 T. melted butter




Instructions.


Peel apples and then slice into quarters, removing inner core. Slice each quarter into 6-8 slices and place inside a bowl of water that has the lemon juice added to it (to keep them from browning while waiting).


Then, prepare the frangipane filling and set aside.


Prepare the crust and layer the bottom with the frangipane filling. Layer the apple slices slightly overlapping in a circular pattern starting on the outermost edge until you have completely covered the frangipane. Brush the apple slices with the butter and bake the tart in a 400*F preheated oven for 45-50 minutes. Remove from oven and after cooling for 15-20 minutes brush the tart with the honey or apricot jelly and sprinkle the raw sugar over for decoration. Best warm, but delicious cold too. 


Edited 9/16/2009 8:17 am ET by suz

roz's picture

(post #65192, reply #7 of 10)

I must have missed when you moved from one end of the country to the other! Is Brookings the Northern CA-Southern OR part that is going become a separate state? Looks like a lovely place to live.

And the apple frangipane tart looks really good. I also recommend doubling the tart recipe, just to have enough to make the sides (or tall) substantial. This dough is fragile. Leftover dough can be baked with some sugar and cinnamon to eat on its own.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
suz's picture

(post #65192, reply #8 of 10)

OOps!  LOL.  I copied the blog, it's not me.  I live in NYC but do have a sister who lives outside of Eugene Oregon.

Amy's picture

(post #65192, reply #2 of 10)

From David Lebovitz's blog. Yes, I made the exact thing recently, with the quiche-y type filling. The crust was easy and good.

suz's picture

(post #65192, reply #6 of 10)

Exactly where it came from.  Glad for the positive review.

MadMom's picture

(post #65192, reply #3 of 10)

Interesting.  Totally opposite from the cold butter thingy we've always been taught.  Might have to try it.



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Gary's picture

(post #65192, reply #4 of 10)

They are trying to achieve a different result. The oil totally coats the flour's proteins so it cannot form gluten. You end up with a very short dough, which is why another post described it as very fragile. These types of crusts are good for fillings that are very liquid, such as custards so that the filling does not soak through the crust during baking. Cold butter cut in just a little give a flakey crust, but cannot tolerate a lot of moisture from the filling.

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The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

SarahJB's picture

(post #65192, reply #9 of 10)

Is this similar to a pate a choux dough? It looks a little like the same method. Looks interesting!

suz's picture

(post #65192, reply #10 of 10)

Not really the same but I do see why you think so.  It's on my very long list to try.