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Freezing hot cake? Weird recipe

nutcakes's picture

I have to make a casual cake for 20 or so for tomorrow and I decided to do a banana cake since I had a ripe bunch on hand. I picked this untried one from Zaar because of the 500+ great reviews and it is in the oven now. However take a look at the step where they say to remove from oven and freeze right away. So it will be hot? Does the hot pan go in too? Anyone made this?


http://www.recipezaar.com/Best-Ever-Banana-Cake-With-Cream-Cheese-Frosting-67256


I did 2 9x13 layers. Am debating if I should stack or just frost each separately. I was going to do a cream cheese frosting but maybe not the one here. I think a bit more butter? And if I stack, will it be nice to put some whipped chocolate ganache in the middle instead of the sweet frosting? It is only for a local bowling club and they aren't picky, anything homemade is raved over, but I'd like to make it fun for me.


OOh: just checked it after an hour and I should have smoothed the batter in the pan. It has eruptions and mountains and is quite liquidy in the center but browning unevenly elsewhere. wow.


 


Edited 8/20/2009 6:22 pm ET by nutcakes

ashleyd's picture

(post #65183, reply #1 of 26)

What can I say, I work in IT and when anything goes wrong we use the acronym RTFM, which roughly translated means look at the instructions. If you're going to try something new to critical timescales then my best advice is to read the recipe thoroughly in advance, work out where the problems might arise, use your knowledge and then follow the instructions, adjusted as necessary. If you don't then you're going to be here asking for last minute help for a cause that is probably already lost.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

nutcakes's picture

(post #65183, reply #2 of 26)

Nothing is going wrong and I have plenty of time. I was trying to decide whether to freeze the cake or not. I've not seen that done before. It won't be ruined if I don't, and I feel fine winging it with banana cake. It is settling down down and I'm about to pull it out of the oven.


Add: the cakes look incredibly fluffy and moist, I think I'm going to be happy. but freezing? akkk


and I know from RTFM


 


Edited 8/20/2009 6:57 pm ET by nutcakes

ashleyd's picture

(post #65183, reply #3 of 26)

In which case I can only commend your sense of adventure and wish you well, I'm sure the recipients will enjoy it.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

TracyK's picture

(post #65183, reply #14 of 26)

I'm almost certain the freezer step is to try to minimize carryover cooking, which often is the cause for cakes being too dry. People usually bake cakes until they're totally done, edges pulling away from the pan, at which point the cake will be overdone as then carryover cooking takes it beyond the ideal texture.


Sticking the cake in the freezer is about equivalent to putting blanched veggies in a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking.


Whether or not it actually makes much of a difference, particularly for more experienced bakers, is anyone's guess!



"Attend to the details. Teach your children manners. Write cogent paragraphs. Drive carefully. And make a good potato salad, one with some crunch, maybe accompanied by a fried drumstick with crackly skin -- the humble potato and the stupid chicken, ennobled by diligent cooking -- and is this not the meaning of our beautiful country, to take what is common and enable it to become beautiful?"

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor


Edited 8/21/2009 10:11 am ET by TracyK

Gretchen's picture

(post #65183, reply #15 of 26)

That's an interesting point.  And Nutcakes saying that the crumb was so good probably does make this step good.  It would really depend on the cake too--as this is described as having the crumb of carrot cake.

Gretchen

Gretchen
nutcakes's picture

(post #65183, reply #22 of 26)

Oh, sorry it doesn't look like I reported back. It was a wet cake (gummy, soggy to you perhaps) and much link any moist banana loaf. So not so interesting, but the flavor was very good. I got good comments, but not as many as usual.


I don't remember if I mentioned that I did 2 9x13 layers. That didn't align well. Do you cut the cake edges to align. Or do I need to get better baking pans? Is straight edge right or round edge?


I have been hired to bake one that size of the Dorrie Greenspan/Nick Maglieri Party Cake and am worried about success. Especially cause those layers are split. And more especially because I am a bad decorator.

courgette's picture

(post #65183, reply #23 of 26)

Good luck with that. People really like my cakes too, but I only make them for family or REALLY close friends who are like family. That way if there is an issue, well, they love me anyway!


Mo

nutcakes's picture

(post #65183, reply #24 of 26)

Yeah. She has had many cakes that I have made, so I figure she knows what she is getting. Homey and homely cakes that taste good. Most of the ones are something I made monthly for an event and they are simple because the budget is tight. This one is a little more fancy. I'd like to do it right. She said she did not care about what kind of cake at all, and might ask her family to pick, but when I describled some options, she said "that's the one!" when I described the Nick M/Dorrie G party cake. She got very excited and said she loves tons of coconut, so she wants it on top too, which will hide my bad frosting skill.


But she also has a family member who gets sick from eating coconut. She wants some part with no coconut, no matter how it looks. So I am thinking instead of making one giant cake, I can talk her into 2 cakes, one with or one without. OR, I can do a batch of cupcakes without coconut.


What do you think of that? Otherwise, I was going to put a swatch of waxed paper over a stripe of the 9x13 cake, coconut the rest, chill, and fix the buttercream after I pulled it off.


I really don't have any idea what I am doing, but I know it won't be a fail.


 

courgette's picture

(post #65183, reply #25 of 26)

Any of those options seem like they would work. There are lots of people who don't like coconut though. Maybe you could make alternating sections of coconut a design feature, thereby having the option for more than one person. Or just do some pretty cupcakes.


Mo

nutcakes's picture

(post #65183, reply #26 of 26)

Really she went nuts just over the lemon and raspberry aspect. When I said coconut, she said she wanted AS MUCH COCONUT and as much leftover CAKE AS AS POSSIBLE. Only the guy who ca'tn have it spoke up and said he would skip cake. We both said NOT.

unbaked's picture

(post #65183, reply #11 of 26)

RTFM....in Elements of Style? :P

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

Gretchen's picture

(post #65183, reply #4 of 26)

I don't think it will make any difference. That cake will be deliciously moist with tht amount of butter. I wouldn't freeze it for overnight, personally.

Gretchen

Gretchen
ashleyd's picture

(post #65183, reply #5 of 26)

There's the thing, referenced in another thread about ingredients, the instructions say to freeze it, it's an unusual step so why do it? Was it because the person who came up with the recipe got caught out without enough countertop space and stuck it in the freezer for 45 minutes and the result was OK, or was it because there is some kind of scientific information behind it. If you made two cakes, one with the freezing and one without would you be able to tell the difference? Would it be worth it? Enquiring minds want to know.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

nutcakes's picture

(post #65183, reply #6 of 26)

I considered leaving one in and one out, but decided not to. Maybe next time, if I like the cake. All indications show that this is a fab cake.


I would love to know the reasons too, that is why I posted here to see if anyone had any insight. It seems to me that this is an uncredited recipe that is poorly copied. They say that the freezing helps with moistness. I just see it as helping tighten the crumb. We will see tomorrow.

RheaS's picture

(post #65183, reply #7 of 26)

The only recipe I have ever seen and tried where you put a hot pan into the freezer is Steve's Ritual Brownies from Alice Medrich (Cookies and Brownies book). Alice Medrich changed the "ritual" a little by using an ice bath in a freezer. It's supposed to produce brownies with a creamy center, crisp outside and fudgy in-between. The method worked, but I've had similar results without an ice bath or putting the hot pan in the freezer.

nutcakes's picture

(post #65183, reply #10 of 26)

Thanks for the reference, I think it is supposed to do the same for this cake. Moist inside, crisp outside. Either way, I have wrapped the cakes and they are resting overnight now. I think this cake will be amazing, based on the crumbs I tasted. Very intense banana flavor, so you have to like banana. Now I am just left with the assembly.


I hate to just do a cream cheese frosting which is too sweet for me if you do it in the middle too. Oh yeah, I'm going to stack them, since the freezing tightened it up enough to handle without breaking. And it will slice nicely. The host wanted a single layer initially cause he didn't want to deal with plating problems of a round cake. But I think, after chilling, that it will slice nicely in the rectangle stacked form. Just have to decide what to put in the middle. If I can't decide it will be CC frosting. If I get motivated, I will put a chocolate glaze down the middle first, maybe with whipped cream.

Heather's picture

(post #65183, reply #8 of 26)

I have actually made this cake. A Canadian friend sent me the recipe. There is apparently a famous cake baker who uses this freezing technique all the time although I think he removes the cake from the pan after 5 minutes, wraps it well, freezes it overnight, then thaws it in its wrapping. The method is supposed to make a really moist cake.

This banana cake comes out with a texture somewhat like carrot cake. Closer to banana bread than a traditional banana cake. My friend raved about it, as did all the other people at the party where it was served. It wasn't my favorite cake, although my dinner guests loved it and my husband ate all that was left over in a couple of days.

TracyK's picture

(post #65183, reply #17 of 26)

There is apparently a famous cake baker who uses this freezing technique all the time although I think he removes the cake from the pan after 5 minutes, wraps it well, freezes it overnight, then thaws it in its wrapping.


That's a totally different technique than just chilling it in the freezer for 45 minutes. 45 minutes is not long enough to solidly freeze a cake that goes in the freezer hot out of the oven... it's probably barely long enough to cool it completely.



"Attend to the details. Teach your children manners. Write cogent paragraphs. Drive carefully. And make a good potato salad, one with some crunch, maybe accompanied by a fried drumstick with crackly skin -- the humble potato and the stupid chicken, ennobled by diligent cooking -- and is this not the meaning of our beautiful country, to take what is common and enable it to become beautiful?"

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

Heather's picture

(post #65183, reply #18 of 26)

I froze mine completely.

TracyK's picture

(post #65183, reply #19 of 26)

I understand that. :)  


But you were saying that the recipe posted in the beginning of this thread is the same technique as the one you mention, and I don't think sticking a hot cake in the freezer for 45 minutes and then taking it out equates to cooling a cake for 5 minutes, removing it from the pan, wrapping it, and freezing it solid overnight.



"Attend to the details. Teach your children manners. Write cogent paragraphs. Drive carefully. And make a good potato salad, one with some crunch, maybe accompanied by a fried drumstick with crackly skin -- the humble potato and the stupid chicken, ennobled by diligent cooking -- and is this not the meaning of our beautiful country, to take what is common and enable it to become beautiful?"

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

Heather's picture

(post #65183, reply #20 of 26)

Oh Damn! You mean I have to be lucid when I post here at night?

When I first read the cake recipe I thought the 45 minutes didn't make sense so, having read about the totally frozen method, I did that. I forgot that the recipe said 45 minutes.


Edited 8/21/2009 1:30 pm by Heather

Heather's picture

(post #65183, reply #21 of 26)

I think you read my reply before I totally redid it. I wrote the first one in a hurry and decided it probably wasn't clear.

TracyK's picture

(post #65183, reply #16 of 26)

45 minutes is not long enough to actually freeze the cake. It's the equivalent of putting the pan in a colder place to cool it down faster than room temp, like sticking it outside in the winter or something.


Like I mentioned, it may have the benefit of reducing carryover cooking, but the level of effectiveness would be highly subjective.


The recipe poster's description of storing this cake in the fridge and having it get better every day leads me to believe that her definition of "moist" would be my definition of "gooey and gummy," but obviously I wouldn't know until I tried it. :)



"Attend to the details. Teach your children manners. Write cogent paragraphs. Drive carefully. And make a good potato salad, one with some crunch, maybe accompanied by a fried drumstick with crackly skin -- the humble potato and the stupid chicken, ennobled by diligent cooking -- and is this not the meaning of our beautiful country, to take what is common and enable it to become beautiful?"

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

Heather's picture

(post #65183, reply #9 of 26)

PS--I frosted 1/2 the cake with cream cheese frosting and 1/2 with ganache and even the chocolate lovers preferred the cream cheese.

Also, it seems to take longer to bake than the recipe indicates. I baked mine in a pyrex 9x13 because that was all I had. I held my breath when I put it in the freezer but all was well.

nutcakes's picture

(post #65183, reply #12 of 26)

Ok, Thanks for the report. I think I will like this and I thought it seemed less like a banana bread which is all I have had. Have never had a 'traditional banana cake' and if you can point to one that would be great.


I baked mine 20 minutes longer than the hour it called for. I made sure it was set and made sure not to overbake.


The Canadian baker, is it


 

Heather's picture

(post #65183, reply #13 of 26)

I used to make a banana cake when the kids were small. I haven't made it for years, but it had a light cake texture. When this frozen cake was such a hit I thought I'd try the old recipe again, but it hasn't happened yet. I'll make it soon and report back to you if we still like it.

PS, did you finish your post?


Edited 8/20/2009 11:32 pm by Heather