NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Flour types

JohnMorgan's picture

Flour types (post #63391)

in

I am living in Europe and do not have the "luxury" of general
"all-purpose" flour (or any of the American kinds/brands which I am
familiar with). Could someone give me a primer on different flour types
(ie: 500, 550, 1050, 1250, etc...) which work well in bread machines
and if it is possible to mix different types for desired results? For
example, if a recipe calls for type 550 and I cannot find it, is it
possible to mix types 1250 & 500 for my needs?

Thanks

Jangomango's picture

(post #63391, reply #1 of 6)

See if this helps.  It's probably too much information, though.   You are just looking for a high gluten/high protein content flour for your bread machine.


http://www.theartisan.net/Flours_One.htm


http://www.theartisan.net/flour_classification_of.htm

Gretchen's picture

(post #63391, reply #2 of 6)

Perhaps RissottoGirl will come along and read this. She will know, as probably Glenys will also.

Gretchen

Gretchen
assibams's picture

(post #63391, reply #3 of 6)

With the numbers you give I assume you live in Germany, right? For all-purpose I usually use the 405 or 550. 550 is good for breadbaking, too. 1050 is a very dark wheat flour. The numbers give the amount of ash (in mg) left after burning 100g of flour. The higher the number the higher the amount of minerals in the flour.


If you need 550 flour and cannot find it (highly unlikely, though, I find it more available than 1050) you can substitute 405 or 1050 (or a mix thereof), but the result will not necessarily be identical. 1050 will give you a very dark bread, 405 is almost white. Difference in "chewiness", too.


For my white breads (wheat) I use 550 and 1050. But I do not use a bread machine, I think the results I get are better (compared to what a friend bakes in her machine) and not that more complicated to keep another appliance. Oh, another friend swears by the bread mixes she buys at Aldi.


"Things are more like they are now than they have ever been" President Gerald Ford

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

JohnMorgan's picture

(post #63391, reply #5 of 6)

Hi Assibams,

Thanks for your reply. I don't live in Germany, but Croatia. I used those type numbers because that's what's in the instructions for the
machine (bought in Austria). Unfortunately I don't speak or read
Croatian well and the only types of flour I've found here so far
are the 500 and 1250 types (hence my question about mixing). The first
time I've tried my (new) machine, the recipe called for 1050 and I used
1250. It didn't rise at all and wasn't very appetizing.

I guess it'll just be trial and error fo ra while :o)

Thanks again.

John

assibams's picture

(post #63391, reply #6 of 6)

Hmmm, Croatia... My German bread baking book doesn't even list the 1250 (would that be wheat?). The highest number there is 1700 for wheat, which is Weizenschrot in German, similar to cracked wheat. I don't think I would use that (the 1700) in a bread by itself. But there shouldn't be too much difference in the 1050 I use and the 1250 you can get. I normally mix 550 and 1050, equal parts, in my wheat bread. Since I bake only sourdough breads, I cannot help you with the amount of yeast needed. Most recipes for (non-machine) wheat breads call for approx. 30g of fresh yeast for 500g flour. I would think the percentages should be the same for machines, no?


What type of yeast do you use? My last 'experiment' with dry yeast went wrong, the dough did not rise at all. My guess is that the yeast was not right, although the expiration date was 12/05. Maybe your yeast was inactive, too?


"Things are more like they are now than they have ever been" President Gerald Ford

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

MadMom's picture

(post #63391, reply #4 of 6)

Hi, John, and welcome to CT.  We have quite a few Europeans here, and they can give you lots of info.  I'm afraid the numbers are all "Greek" to me, so can't help you here, but Assibam's post should be the info you need.  Stick around, and share some of your favorite recipes with us.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin