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Flat cookies

FL.Cook's picture

Flat cookies (post #65224)

in

A bit more flour?

Carole

Carole
MadMom's picture

(post #65224, reply #1 of 28)

Speaking of flour, I always keep mine in the freezer, taking it out a bag at a time and putting it into a container in the pantry.  Also keep yeast in the freezer, and generally use it straight from the freezer (it keeps forever).  Last night I was making Mean's polenta rolls and took the correct measurement of yeast out of the freezer and let it come to room temperature.  Really made a difference.  I post this just in case I'm not the very last one to know this!



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FL.Cook's picture

(post #65224, reply #7 of 28)

I also keep my flour in the freezer, at least to start with. I once found those tiny little bugs in mine, UGH!!! Freezing it seems to take care of it, no more buggies!! I'm sure someone has a reason for the freezing getting rid of any bugs, but i have no idea!

Carole

Carole
DJHinAZ's picture

(post #65224, reply #8 of 28)

Freezing should kill any insect eggs, or at least prevent them from hatching (at least while it's frozen).

I keep a bay leaf in my flour. That seems to work very well.


Edited 10/16/2009 8:55 pm by DJHinAZ

Gretchen's picture

(post #65224, reply #9 of 28)

The bay leaf works on some critters--witness the bay leaf in some curry powders. It doesn't work on weevils, I don't think.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Gretchen's picture

(post #65224, reply #2 of 28)

refrigerate them a bit. Make sure your baking sheet is cool. If you google you'll find a whole laundry list of possibilities that you can "plug in" to what you are doing.

Gretchen

Gretchen
TracyK's picture

(post #65224, reply #3 of 28)

Add 1/4 cup more flour. :)


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                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

TracyK's picture

(post #65224, reply #4 of 28)

I've had that same issue ever since I started measuring flour properly instead of overpacking the measuring cup, LOL. So for the basic Toll House recipe I use a very heavy hand with the flour and they turn out better.


We are all in the same boat, you and me and ex-Gov. Palin and Rep. Joe Wilson, and wealth and social status do not prevail against disease and injury. And now we must reform our health insurance system so that it reflects our common humanity. It is not decent that people avoid seeking help for want of insurance. It is not decent that people go broke trying to get well. You know it and I know it. Time to fix it.

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

DJHinAZ's picture

(post #65224, reply #5 of 28)

I agree about the suggestion for more flour... I always add extra flour when I make this recipe and they turn out great. I also use my Kitchenaid and cream the butter/sugar like crazy, so I don't think it's that. I cream the butter/sugar/vanilla a whole bunch, then add the eggs one at a time, then add the flour and mix it until it's barely incorporated. Then I add the chocolate chips and again mix until they're barely incorporated. They always turn out high and tender.

paretsky's picture

(post #65224, reply #6 of 28)

How funny that this should come up today. I was catching up on back episodes of The Splendid Table, and heard a segment on chocolate chip cookies. The guest identified several things that made for better cookies. Among them was a long rest (24-36 hours) before baking to allow the flour to hydrate.

The original article from the NY Times and the recipe are here:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/09/dining/09chip.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=Perfection?%20Hint:%20It%27s%20Warm%20and%20Has%20a%20Secret&st=cse

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Ozark's picture

(post #65224, reply #10 of 28)

Good article on cookies.


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Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

madnoodle's picture

(post #65224, reply #11 of 28)

My mother would tell you to go back to your wooden spoon.  Are you sure you've always used butter in your cookies?  I know shortening is frowned upon here, but if you use half butter and half shortening, your cookies wouldn't be so flat. (That bit of advice is courtesy of my mother as well.)

What if there were no hypothetical questions?


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Gary's picture

(post #65224, reply #12 of 28)

Shortening has a higher melting point (~130 F) than butter (94F). The flour proteins and starch will take less time to set at that higher temperature.

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madnoodle's picture

(post #65224, reply #13 of 28)

Gary knows the science behind it; all I know is that butter makes for flat, crisp cookies, and shortening makes for thicker, chewier ones.  If you want the best of both worlds, use half of each.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #65224, reply #14 of 28)

It makes a big difference, and not for the better. I always made them with the shortening and butter, but later in life, used all butter because of course, it would be better. Nope. Flat cookies as I recall. The same was true of an all butter pound cake that did better with some shortening as it was written.

Gretchen

Gretchen
TracyK's picture

(post #65224, reply #15 of 28)

I have no problem with shortening, but the recipe only calls for butter (or margarine). I've never made that particular recipe with shortening (though I do use it in pie crust and peanut butter cookies), and I don't think it really needs it if you use enough flour.


We are all in the same boat, you and me and ex-Gov. Palin and Rep. Joe Wilson, and wealth and social status do not prevail against disease and injury. And now we must reform our health insurance system so that it reflects our common humanity. It is not decent that people avoid seeking help for want of insurance. It is not decent that people go broke trying to get well. You know it and I know it. Time to fix it.

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

Gretchen's picture

(post #65224, reply #16 of 28)

It's probably been 20 years since I made it. I have NO idea. But I did notice that using all butter made a difference. Maybe just me. And maybe a different recipe. Who knows.


There are recipes for it I have made with shortening. I have made it with margarine. I have made it with all butter.


Gretchen


Edited 10/18/2009 8:49 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
SuB's picture

(post #65224, reply #17 of 28)

Have you checked the accuracy of your oven temperature?  If your oven isn't heating up as fast or as hot as it once did that could account for flat cookies.  If the oven isn't hot enough they spread before their protein structure is set by the oven heat.


Using an oven thermometer and experimanting with the temperature could help.



Cheers, Sue B.


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Cheers, Sue B.

The older I get, the better I was.

Lee's picture

(post #65224, reply #18 of 28)

The suggestions already given are good ones, but I think the recipe on the bag results in flat cookies more often than not.   DH loves Toll House cookies and makes them regularly, same recipe each time.  Sometimes they come out thicker, but mostly they're pretty flat (which he likes) and sometimes they spread so much he ends up with a big pan cookie.  Just the nature of the beast, I think.


These don't spread as much as Toll House cookies and they're chewier.  I cut back on the sugar.  The recipe is adapted from CI's version:


Chocolate Chip Cookies


Yield:  2 dozen cookies


2 cups plus 2 tablespoons flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/2 sticks (3/4 cup) unsalted butter, melted and cooled
1 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 large egg plus 1 egg yolk
2 teaspoons vanilla
12 ounces semi-sweet chocolate chips


Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.  Line 2 cookie sheets with parchment.


Combine the flour, salt and baking powder in a medium bowl.  Mix the butter, brown sugar and granulated sugar until well blended in the bowl of an electric mixer or by hand.  Mix in the egg, egg yolk and vanilla and mix.  Gradually add the flour until combined.  Stir in the chocolate chips.


Mound about 1 1/2 tablespoons of dough per cookie on the prepared sheets (I use a cookie scoop).  Bake until just golden brown around the edges, about 12 minutes.  Transfer the baking sheets to racks and let cool for for 3 minutes.  Remove the cookies and cool completely on the racks. 


I like this version which was given to me by a friend years ago.  She loved to bake and frequently gave these away to everyone she knew.  We've always called them "Marge's Cookies."  They are thicker than Toll House cookies. 


Chocolate Chip Pecan Cookies


Yield:  About 3 1/2 dozen cookies


2 3/4 cups flour
1 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups butter, softened
1/2 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
One 24 ounce package (4 cups) semi-sweet chocolate chips
1 cup chopped pecans


Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.  In a bowl, combine the flour, baking soda and salt.  In another bowl, beat the butter and sugars until creamy.  Add the eggs and vanilla.  Beat until light and fluffy.  Gradually blend in the flour mixture.  Stir in the chocolate chips and pecans.  Drop by well rounded tablespoons onto ungreased cookie sheets.  Bake for 10 to 12 minutes.  Remove the sheets from the oven and allow to stand, on racks, for 2 to 3 minutes.  Remove the cookies to racks and cool completely. 


 


 


 


 

knitpik's picture

(post #65224, reply #19 of 28)

I've had the same problem when I switched from a hand mixer to KA.
The latter will whip more air into the dough so you have to be really
careful not to overdo it which isn't too hard. To avoid this problem I
use the CI recipe which Lee posted above. I just use a big wooden
spoon.

Lee's picture

(post #65224, reply #20 of 28)

I meant to mention the difference mixing with the far more powerful KA can make.  DH has a tendency to overbeat, and the big pan cookie is usually the result.  My DD, the cookie queen, uses a wooden spoon and adds a little more flour when she makes cc cookies and they aren't flat.

knitpik's picture

(post #65224, reply #21 of 28)

Just shows that powerful KA is not always a good thing, hey?
I'll have to remember to add a little more flour next time and
see how it turns out.

DJHinAZ's picture

(post #65224, reply #22 of 28)

I'll repeat what I said earlier.
I use my KA all the time for making Toll-House cookies, and I beat the HECK out of my butter/sugar mixture (and also when I add the eggs).

I add extra flour.

I NEVER have flat cookies.

knitpik's picture

(post #65224, reply #23 of 28)

How much extra flour are we talking?

DJHinAZ's picture

(post #65224, reply #25 of 28)

I think TracyK mentioned an extra 1/4 cup. I just don't measure particularly carefully--I don't level off the cups very much. 1/4 cup sounds about right, maybe I add 1/3 cup.

knitpik's picture

(post #65224, reply #27 of 28)

Thanks. Sorry, I must have missed Tracy's post.

Gretchen's picture

(post #65224, reply #24 of 28)

I have to agree. I have seen NO difference using a mixer from when I didn't have one. Creaming is good!!  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Lee's picture

(post #65224, reply #26 of 28)

I would bet that the reason you can beat the heck out of the cookie dough and not have flat cookies is because you increase the flour.  Extra flour gives the dough more structure.  Try doing that with the original recipe and I'll bet you end up with one of DH's special pan-size cookies.  ;0)

Pati's picture

(post #65224, reply #28 of 28)

My son called me one day asking the same question. When he made cookies as a kid at home they were fine. Now they are flat and spread all over the pan.  "What is going on?"  After many questions it turned out he was using a product (by Land of Lakes, I think) called baking butter, which wasn't butter at all but a hybrid of butter and margarine. This may be obvious to you as a long time baker, but make sure you are using a good quality butter. Some cheap butters, especially here in the States, can have more moisture and less fat than "in the old days."


Let us know how your experimenting goes.