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Cutting a Lemon Tart

thedessertlady's picture

Cutting a Lemon Tart (post #65134)

in

I make a fabulous Lemon Tart.
It has lots of lemon zest in it.
I have the worst time cutting it so the pieces don't go a little jagged.
I like perfect looking pieces.
A sushi knife does a very good job but they are $180.00 and I don't feel like buying one to cut Lemon Tart.
It is baked in a spring from pan in tin foil so there is no issue with cutting the slices. Any ideas?

TracyK's picture

(post #65134, reply #1 of 25)

I may not understand the problem... your pieces look lovely to me. :)


Do you heat the knife by running it under hot tap water before cutting (then wiping dry)? That might help.



"One of the great strengths of the United States is … we do not consider ourselves a Christian nation or a Jewish nation or a Muslim nation. We consider ourselves a nation of citizens who are bound by ideals and a set of values."

                                                            --President Barack Obama

sally ryan's picture

(post #65134, reply #2 of 25)

Recipe please!  That looks great.

thedessertlady's picture

(post #65134, reply #6 of 25)

I have tried the hot knife and I wipe every cut but that does not help.
When you dust with icing sugar it helps the look a lot. I would still like the undusted pieces to look better.

unbaked's picture

(post #65134, reply #8 of 25)

Try those wide pizza cutters. Not the wheel type, but the ones with the rolled edge.

I should find a picture of it. I've had great luck cutting brownies and other sticky things with one since it's long enough to go through without sawing.

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

unbaked's picture

(post #65134, reply #9 of 25)

Here's a picture:

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine


Edited 6/17/2009 8:25 pm by unbaked

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

PreviewAttachmentSize
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thedessertlady's picture

(post #65134, reply #10 of 25)

Thanks for that tip. I will look for one and give it a try.
I still think that it might pull the edges but we will see.

thecooktoo's picture

(post #65134, reply #13 of 25)

I have always found that if I chill the pie completely (at least overnight in the bottom of the fridge) and use a hot, thin bladed knife (ala Gretchen) that I can get a good clean slice of even coconut cream pie.


I think part of your problem might be that if you are using a lot of lemon zest, no knife that I know of is going to be able to slice through the zest without pulling or dragging as it goes down.


ETA - How are you zesting the lemons...if you are using a traditional zester that might be part of the problem...if you are using a really fine Microplane, not sure how you could improve it.


Jim


Edited 6/18/2009 9:39 am ET by thecooktoo

Gretchen's picture

(post #65134, reply #14 of 25)

Good  point about the zest.

Gretchen

Gretchen
thedessertlady's picture

(post #65134, reply #15 of 25)

I am using a mircoplane zester and about 1 1/2 tbsp per tart.
Maybe I am asking for too much. But it just that the dull sushi knife
does just a great job but I don't want to spend $180.00.

Gretchen's picture

(post #65134, reply #16 of 25)

Since you keep returning to the sushi knife, maybe one of these, the longer of which looks like my meat slicer (definitely non-serated, and flat bladed).


http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=sushi+knife


Gretchen
Gretchen
thecooktoo's picture

(post #65134, reply #18 of 25)

If you want to talk about sharp knives, I think the Mac's that I use are sharper and maintain their edge better than any knife I have ever used.  MAC claims that they are the sharpest knife in the world, and a lot of people seem to agree with that.


If you want a really sharp knife, get in touch with me.  I carry MAC's for the Knife Skills Classes and the Personal Chef Classes that I teach.  And I sell them at a discount.


Jim

Heather's picture

(post #65134, reply #20 of 25)

I've had MAC knives for years and really like them. Do you use the little sharpener that MAC sells?

thecooktoo's picture

(post #65134, reply #22 of 25)

Yea.  I have an 8" Chefs Knife with grantons that a friend gave me 9 years ago when I taught the first personal chef class for her.  It is the primary knife in my kitchen and in my "go bag".  It has never been sharpened on a stone or sent out.  The only thing I use on it the Fiskars Roll-Sharp and that knife will still take your fingernail off if given a chance after a couple of glasses of wine!  And I use it every day.


ETA - I have put all of my German knives except a 12" ultra thin carbon steel slicer from Wustoff that was made in the 30's (this thing is a razor!) into my traveling tool box that I take to inhome dinner parties and cooking classes.  The MACS are so much easier to maintain, stay sharp and just never cause a problem.


One of my santoku's developed a little chip right in the middle of the blade...I sent it back to the importer and they repaired it and returned it at no charge.


Jim


 


Jim


Edited 6/19/2009 10:22 am ET by thecooktoo

Heather's picture

(post #65134, reply #23 of 25)

Love mine too! I've had mine about 15 years and never had a problem with breakage.

courgette's picture

(post #65134, reply #21 of 25)

I had two Mac knives and they both broke. The shop replaced the first one for me but when the second one broke, he suggested another brand. I did love them though and am thinking abut getting another.


The first one, the tip broke off when I was slicing an onion. The second one got an unexplained chip in the blade near the handle. They were the most babied knives in history, I totally don't understand it. Never had a problem with any other knife.


Mo


Edited 6/20/2009 9:40 am ET by courgette

thedessertlady's picture

(post #65134, reply #24 of 25)

I have never heard of Mac Knives. I will do a little googling.

unbaked's picture

(post #65134, reply #25 of 25)

10.99 or so on Amazon. Just type in pizza cutter in the search. That's where I stole the picture :)

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

bwf17's picture

(post #65134, reply #3 of 25)

Have you tried unflavored dental floss or clear fishing line?  It works for me except the crust.

 

 
Gretchen's picture

(post #65134, reply #4 of 25)

Your cuts look fine. If I was choosing a knife from my rack it might be the long thin slicer, used by cutting straight down with no motion.

Gretchen

Gretchen
thedessertlady's picture

(post #65134, reply #7 of 25)

I bought a "slicing" knife and it made no better cuts than any other knife. I was hoping that might help as well.

Gretchen's picture

(post #65134, reply #12 of 25)

If you are talking about the "slicing knife" for cakes, NO!!!  I am talking about a meat slicer--it is a very long very skinny very sharp knife.  Mine is a "good" Sabatier (as opposed to the lesser brands of that brand).  ;o)


I am not suggesting you even buy that, but a skinny sharp knife, dipped as others have suggested, should do this job fairly well since you can remove the sides and cut straight down.


Gretchen
Gretchen
RuthWells's picture

(post #65134, reply #5 of 25)

For some reason I can't see your photos, but chilling the tart before slicing might help.

Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw


www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com



www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

evelyn's picture

(post #65134, reply #11 of 25)

no ideas...but man that tart looks good! We need the recipe, of course. :-)

Children are unpredictable. You never know what inconsistency they're going to catch you in next.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
Glenys's picture

(post #65134, reply #17 of 25)

Do you bake to set the filling or fill the crust and bake to set?

Do you use a think sharp knife sprayed with Pam?

thedessertlady's picture

(post #65134, reply #19 of 25)

I bake the crust and then pour in the filling and then bake again.
I will try the Pam tomorrow let you know how it goes.